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ANNUAL REPORT 2013 - 14

Table of contents

The following Annual Report for the formerly known Land Development Agency, presents information on statutory compliance, financial, non-financial and operational performance.

Section B

Section C

Section D

Section E

Section F

B.1. Organisational Overview

OUR VISION

The Land Development Agency contributes positively to the economic and social development of the ACT by building vibrant and sustainable communities through greenfield and urban renewal projects for the development of residential, commercial, industrial, community and non-urban land.

MISSION AND VALUES

The LDA strives to be an organisation of excellence that:

  • recognises it is a key instrument for the delivery of ACT Government policies;
  • acts commercially;
  • promotes and rewards innovation;
  • is adaptable;
  • behaves ethically and professionally in all that it does; and
  • appropriately values its people and its customers.

The LDA is committed to the core values of professionalism, honesty, integrity, innovation and cooperation, and pursues these values in all its business dealings.

The LDA is dedicated to achieving new standards of innovation, excellence and value in urban design and sustainable development. Its commitment has been recognised with multiple industry awards.

OUR ROLE

The LDA releases and develops government owned land for residential, commercial, industrial and community purposes. In doing so, the LDA seeks to balance potentially competing public sector and commercial priorities and provide opportunities for private sector development to optimise the community benefit from the ACT’s land assets.

ESTABLISHMENT

The LDA is a Territory authority established by section 31 of the Planning and Development Act 2007 (PDA). The LDA does not administer any enactments, but is bound by chapter 4 of the PDA. The PDA provides for planning (ACT Planning and Land Authority as custodian of the Territory Plan) and development (the LDA as land developer in compliance with the Territory Plan) in implementing a land system that contributes to the orderly and sustainable development of the ACT.

The LDA Governing Board is established by section 42 of the PDA and Board members are appointed under that section. The role of the Board is to govern the LDA in accordance with the Financial Management Act 1996 (FMA) and the PDA. The Board has appointed a LDA Board Audit and Risk Committee that meets at least quarterly.

As part of the annual budget process, the Government approves a Statement of Intent for the LDA that sets out the objectives and deliverables for the LDA, including land release and revenue targets. An explanation of the LDA’s performance against these Statement of Intent estimates is provided at Section B.2 of this report, Performance Analysis.

The LDA must also comply with any directions given to it by the relevant Minister under section 37 of the PDA, and is staffed under the Public Sector Management Act 1994 (PSMA).

The Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of the LDA holds all the powers of a CEO of a Territory instrumentality under the PSMA. The CEO is a statutory office holder appointed under the FMA and is a member of the LDA Board. The role of the CEO is combined with the role of the Director-General, Economic Development, to manage the LDA in accordance with governance arrangements determined by the LDA Board.

FUNCTIONS AND SERVICES

The key objectives of the LDA, as set out in its 2013-14 Statement of Intent (SOI), were to:

  • ensure that an adequate supply of greenfield and brownfield land will be maintained to meet market demand for residential, commercial, industrial and community use;
  • contribute to the delivery of the Government’s policies and priorities related to affordable housing, sustainability, climate change and urban intensification;
  • adopt a ‘One Government’ approach during the land development process through the cultivation and maintenance of productive relationships across the ACT Government;
  • operate efficiently in the markets in which it operates and provide agreed returns to the Territory on its investment in the Agency;
  • ensure that key commercial decisions on land in the ACT are made with due consideration to the sustainability of the Territory (that is, balancing economic, social and environmental factors); and
  • engage the community in a timely manner in the land development process and continue to improve community engagement processes for redevelopments.

In attaining these objectives, the LDA’s core deliverables for 2013-14 were to:

  • deliver the Government’s agreed Indicative Land Release Programs for residential, commercial, industrial and community land uses;
  • provide timely support for direct sales of land by the Government;
  • contribute to the delivery of the Capital Metro project;
  • deliver quality and sustainable developments, including public realm and community development;
  • provide a variety of land and housing options that set benchmarks for quality and timeliness in affordable housing, sustainable building and design;
  • contribute to diversity in the supply of new housing in the Territory, reflective of current and anticipated demographic change;
  • provide a safe working environment for LDA staff; and
  • promote a safe and healthy workplace by the appropriate monitoring of contractors engaged by the LDA to ensure their work is conducted safely.

CLIENTS AND STAKEHOLDERS

Our primary client is the ACT community. The LDA engages with the community in relation to all facets of land release and development. The LDA actively seeks out, considers and acts on the views of the community to deliver appropriate and high quality land development outcomes which provide a social and financial return on the land asset.

Our primary stakeholder is the ACT Government. Other stakeholders include (in no particular order):

  • the ACT community;
  • industry and business groups;
  • builders, suppliers and contractors;
  • Community Councils and groups;
  • National Capital Authority; and
  • ACT Government directorates.

ORGANISATIONAL STRUCTURE

The LDA is an agency within the Economic Development portfolio. Under a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) between LDA and Economic Development, the two organisations share the provision of a range of management and support functions in the interests of efficiency. For example the LDA provides financial management services to Economic Development, while Economic Development provides community engagement and workforce and governance services to LDA. In addition, the CEO of LDA is also the Director-General of Economic Development, while the Deputy Director-General Land Development and Corporate of Economic Development is also the Deputy CEO of LDA.

Office of the Chief Executive Officer

The LDA functional responsibilities of the Office of the Chief Executive Officer include:

  • preparation and monitoring implementation of the LDA SOI;
  • provision of policy, secretariat and administrative support to the LDA Board and Audit and Risk Committee;
  • facilitation of the LDA’s responses to issues raised by the community, industry and other Government agencies; and
  • leading community engagement activities associated with land development in the Territory.

Land Development

The LDA functional responsibilities of Land Development (Greenfield and Urban Renewal):

  • development of Government-owned land for release for residential, commercial, industrial, community and non-urban purposes as indicated in the ACT Government’s Indicative Land Release Programs (ILRP);
  • obtaining relevant approvals, including environmental, development and detail design;
  • providing due diligence to inform the ILRP and resolving strategic environmental and planning issues for projects that are to be released in the ILRP out years;
  • assessing sites for potential future release and development, including Master Plan delivery in line with the ACT Government’s ILRP;
  • procurement and project management of consultant, civil and landscape construction works;
  • working with the Economic Development Infrastructure and Capital Works branch to maximise the efficient and timely delivery of LDA estate works with interfacing capital works;
  • management of the Civil Engineering Services Panel;
  • supporting the Government’s direct sales by undertaking investigations and minor civil works;
  • undertaking the LDA’s Minor Works Program;
  • being at the forefront of sustainable design through the review of projects by the LDA Design Review Panel (DRP); and
  • supporting the delivery of environmentally and socially sustainable land developments and construction through the LDA estates projects.

Operational support:

  • maintaining the LDA Risk Register;
  • monitoring project master program and Key Performance Indicators;
  • management of legal and compliance matters for the LDA; and
  • development and maintenance of Work Health and Safety systems to meet obligations under the Work Health and Safety Act 2011.

Sales, Marketing and Land Management

The responsibilities of the Sales, Marketing and Land Management section include:

  • management of the marketing and sale of residential, commercial, industrial and community land;
  • management of all valuation services, requests, briefs and approval;
  • undertaking land management services, including land custodian and licence arrangements;
  • manage LDA corporate branding;
  • providing strategic advice to LDA executive on the land release program;
  • providing initial and ongoing advice to all project teams on new suburbs, precincts and development sites on product mix, type and affordable housing options;
  • management of the LDA Panel of Commercial and Residential Property Agents;
  • maintaining and building associations with external stakeholders; and
  • management of the Mingle Community Development Program.

Strategic Finance

The LDA’s Strategic Finance Branch is accountable for delivery of value-added tactical and strategic financial services, support, analysis and advice to the LDA Board and other key stakeholders.  The Branch is also responsible for a range financial compliance activities including, statutory financial reporting, taxation administration and financial framework development and implementation.

OUR STRUCTURE – AS AT 30 JUNE 2014

Minister for Economic Development Minister for Sport and Recreation Minister for Tourism and Events Minister BarrDirector-General, Economic Development DirectorateChief Executive Officer, Land Development AgencyCoordinator-GeneralDavid Dawes Land Development AgencyGoverning BoardMinister for Racing and GamingMinister BurchDirectorChange ManagementAnita HargreavesDirectorOffice of the Director-General/ Chief Executive OfficerChris Wilson Communications DirectorAlison Abernethy Deputy Director-General, Land Development and CorporateDeputy Chief Executive Officer, Land Development Agency Dan Stewart Deputy Director-GeneralBusiness, Tourism, Events and Sport Gary Rake Executive DirectorPolicy, Projects and Legislation Louise Gilding Executive DirectorLand Development Chris Reynolds Executive DirectorCorporate Vacant Director Strategic FinanceDermot Walsh A/g Director Workforce and GovernanceJoanne Rosewarne DirectorUrban Renewal Paul Lewis Sales, Marketing and Land ManagementDirector Clint Peters Executive DirectorInnovation, Trade and InvestmentIan Cox General ManagerVenue and Event Services Neale Guthrie DirectorVisitCanberra Ian Hill DirectorSport and Recreation Services Jenny Priest DirectorInfrastructure and Capital WorksGlenn Lacey ACT Gambling and Racing CommissionGoverning BoardChief Executive Officer ACT Gambling and Racing CommissionGreg Jones Exhibition Park CorporationGoverning BoardGeneral Manager Exhibition Park Corporation Liz Clarke Represents the areas of the Directorate covered in this report.			Represents other agencies within the Economic Development Portfolio (the Land Development Agency, Gambling and Racing Commission and Exhibition Park Corporation) that produce separate Annual Reports.

REPORT BY THE CHAIR

On behalf of the Land Development Agency Board, management and staff, I am pleased to present the Agency’s 2013-14 Annual Report.

Despite some challenging market conditions the Land Development Agency has been able to achieve substantial outcomes over the last year.

Land for 3,299 dwellings has been released. While short of our ambitious target of 4,800, these releases have provided the Canberra community with a wide range of future housing options.

Highlights have included the initial release of single residential and medium density sites in Lawson in the heart of Belconnen. This release of sites for 674 dwellings met with a very enthusiastic response. Located just three kilometres from the Belconnen town centre and directly across from a major university. Lawson will eventually accommodate around 1,850 dwellings in a mix of low, medium and higher density development.

Equally successful was the market response to the release of five medium sites, totalling 528 dwellings, at the intersection of Anzac Parade and Constitution Avenue in Campbell. The sale of these sites will realise $65 million in revenue.

Another major urban infill project underway is the ‘Southquay Greenway’ in the Tuggeranong Lake area. This development represents a boost for the Tuggeranong region and the land sales to date reflect the positivity in the local market. Land for 306 dwellings was released this year.

In terms of greenfield development, the suburb of Moncrieff in Gungahlin is under development with an initial release of land for 500 dwellings being offered to small builders through a ‘Put and Call Options’ process to stimulate the local market. Moncrieff will eventually comprise a mixture of around 2,000 single residential, medium and high density multi-unit developments, along with the usual commercial and community amenities. We expect that Moncrieff will provide some great opportunities for affordable first home purchases.

As part of the stimulus package that the Government announced in March 2014, the Land Development Agency is facilitating the accelerated development of Moncrieff. This work is providing a welcome stimulus to the Canberra capital works sector.

In addition to these major new developments, the Land Development Agency is continuing to deliver residential, commercial and community land in a range of new and established suburbs across Canberra. At present demand for large scale industrial land has been met and the Land Development Agency has a inventory of available industrial land.

As we look forward, major developments at Denman Prospect in Molonglo and at West Belconnen will continue to contribute to meeting the housing needs of the Canberra community. In the slightly longer term, the City to the Lake project and plans for the redeveloping of the Northbourne Avenue corridor will provide some new precincts that will transform major areas of inner Canberra. The Land Development Agency will continue to pursue opportunities for the future development of other infill and greenfield developments to provide Canberrans with a range of housing options.

The Land Development Agency is aware that it makes an important financial contribution to the ACT budget. The Agency’s total return to the Government in 2013-14 was some $150 million. A similar return is expected in 2014-15.

The Land Development Agency is proud of its continuing contribution to environmental protection and to the quality of the design of LDA estates. This focus will continue into the future. Similarly, the Land Development Agency will continue with its active and successful program of community engagement on proposed new projects and in supporting the development of communities in new estates.

Following the success of the Franklin Charity House project in 2013 the Land Development Agency is working closely with the ACT Government and the Master Builders Association to plan another Charity House project. I look forward to building further on the very positive outcomes that have been achieved through these projects.

I was very pleased to see Land Development Agency projects nominated in a range of local and national Awards. In particular the Crace Joint Venture was recognised in several awards, including being named Property Development of the Year at the ACT Property Council awards. The project also received national recognition at the 2014 Property Council of Australia/Rider Levett Bucknall Innovation and Excellence Awards for the Best Master Planned Community. Crace was awarded for offering the highest levels of community, sustainability and amenity. Other developments nominated for awards during the year included Kingston Foreshore and Bonner Residential Estate.

My very sincere thanks to my fellow Board Members, namely Deputy Chair Rob Tonkin, Sandra Lambert, Susan Proctor and Jim Shonk for their wise and practical input.

Finally, on behalf of the Board, I would like to thank the Land Development Agency CEO David Dawes, his executives and staff, and the wide range of companies that contribute to the delivery of our projects. They can be very pleased with their contributions and achievements during 2013-14.

Ross Barrett OAM LDA Board Chair

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER REPORT

In 2013-14 the LDA has progressed a number of transformational projects that will further contribute to the vibrancy and liveability of Canberra.

As a priority project for the ACT Government, City to the Lake is one of Australia’s largest urban renewal projects. At its core City to the Lake is about connecting Canberrans and Australians to Canberra, creating a city that is vibrant, modern and dynamic.

The core elements of the project include:

  • increasing residents in the city (about 15,000-20,000);
  • attracting more tourists and increasing their length of stay;
  • creating a great new public waterfront;
  • improving lake water quality; and
  • delivering key infrastructure (in partnership with the private sector where relevant), including:
    • the Australia Forum (a convention and exhibition centre);
    • a multi-use, potentially indoor, stadium;
    • an aquatic centre with an urban beach; and
    • realignment of Parkes Way to allow easy access to West Basin.

This is just one of over a dozen LDA development projects being progressed across the Territory, from Greenway in the south to West Belconnen and Bonner in the north, as well as significant development activity in Molonglo and Lawson.

With the LDA now in its 11th year, I am mindful that, as a quasi-commercial entity, the Agency must keep pace with and be responsive to industry.

To this end, in May 2014 I engaged KPMG to undertake a functional review of the LDA. This review is considering whether the LDA’s current business model is the optimum arrangement to position the LDA for the medium term (five to ten years) and whether there are different delivery models that could be utilised to better achieve the LDA’s business objectives. This review will also compare the LDA to other government land development agencies in terms of cost and output.

We have also continued to build on the close working relationship we have with other Australian and New Zealand Government Land Organisations (GLO), including participating in a GLO conference held in New Zealand during May 2014. Through these relationships, we are able to learn from the experiences of other jurisdictions to help guide best practice in our own work.

Residential Land Releases

Land release for residential development remains a key focus for the LDA. In 2013-14, residential land releases totalled sites for 3,299 dwellings, compared with the target of 4,800. The total number released includes sites for single residential or detached dwellings and multi-unit developments in LDA estates, LDA joint ventures, and a range of direct sales in locations across Canberra.

A number of scheduled releases did not occur due to a combination of delays or deferrals in provision of infrastructure, Commonwealth environmental clearances, high levels of existing supply in town centres and regulatory processes. These factors caused delays to the following key sites:

  • 1,200 dwelling sites in Belconnen;
  • 300 dwellings in Downer;
  • 300 dwelling sites in Throsby;
  • 294 dwelling sites in Kingston; and
  • 100 dwelling sites on Northbourne Avenue.

To counter these delays, a number of alternative residential sites programmed for release in future years were accelerated into 2013-14. The major additional releases came from the LDA estates on Flemington Road, and at Campbell, Kingston and Coombs.

The LDA delivered sites across Canberra with releases in new estates in Lawson, Campbell, Greenway, Amaroo and Moncrieff, along with the existing estates of Flemington Road and Coombs, the LDA joint venture at Crace and various infill sites. The joint venture estate at Crace released the final 25 dwelling sites.

The proposed release of land for aged care at the Village Creek school site at Kambah was not delivered due to delays in the demolition of existing buildings on the site.

Despite some contamination issues at Kingston Foreshore, the project released 151 dwelling sites just short of its target of 194 in addition to the release and sale of 303 dwelling sites that has been withdrawn from sale due to environmental delays in 2011.

Commercial and industrial land releases

The LDA released 74,585 sqm of commercial land in 2013-14, compared with the target of 122,438 sqm. The shortfall was mainly due to high levels of existing supply and corresponding lack of demand in town centres.

The results of the various auction and ballot processes show that confidence in the local market remains strong, with particularly strong results in Lawson and Campbell which attached strong bidding both from local, interstate and international buyers.

A similar sentiment is not being seen with respect to industrial land, where no releases were made in 2013-14 due to a significant inventory of serviced land being available.

Inventory levels

The LDA is working to grow its inventory of serviced residential land to provide maximum choice and flexibility for potential purchasers. As at 30 June 2014, six single residential blocks were held in inventory.

As noted above, an inventory of serviced industrial land has been established with over 67,629 sqm available for sale in the New West Estate at Hume.

Work Health and Safety

With a goal of achieving best practice work health and safety outcomes on all sites that the LDA commissions, work health and safety continues to be an important component of the workplace culture.

The Interim Guidelines for Managing Work Health and Safety in the Construction Industry developed in 2012-13 have been embedded into the work that we do and guide how our LDA project directors and managers involved in construction projects deliver all stages of a construction project.

Internally, the LDA continues to implement the actions identified in the Work Health and Safety Strategic Plan.

Housing affordability initiatives

Since the release of the Affordable Housing Action Plan in 2007 (AHAP), the Government has made concerted efforts to improve housing affordability in the Territory. Now in its third phase, the AHAP includes a total of 98 separate actions that aim to address a wide range of issues impacting affordability.

The most fundamental issue driving housing affordability is housing supply.  To this end, the LDA is working to improve and accelerate the Land Release Program. Significant increases in housing supply have been achieved over the last several years. However, the strength of the ACT economy and our attractiveness as a place to live has seen our population grow at record levels in recent years, underpinning high levels of demand for housing in both homeowner and rental markets.

Due to a combination of increased supply and more recent economic conditions and concerns about the local implications of the recent Federal election, housing prices have stabilised compared to the rapid growth seen at the end of the last decade. In addition, our rental markets, which tend to house our low and moderate income households, have eased their vacancy rates and in many cases have had price reductions.

This approach, of addressing supply constraints, coupled with a suite of other policies and concessions, such as a requirement for 20 per cent of housing in greenfield estates to meet affordability criteria, have been and will continue to increase the supply of affordable housing in Canberra.

The LDA also provides the option for eligible purchasers of land in LDA residential estates to take up a Land Rent Lease. LDA blocks were part of the Land Rent Scheme for releases in Dunlop, Franklin, Bonner, Harrison 4, Jacka, Wright and Coombs.

Sustainability and Climate Change

The LDA has continued to incorporate the principles of ecologically sustainable development into its activities. Sustainability data from all LDA projects is reported under eight key themes:

  • energy and emissions;
  • water;
  • landscape and biodiversity;
  • waste and materials;
  • influencing design;
  • community;
  • transport; and
  • affordability.

This reporting gives an indication of sustainability measures undertaken by the LDA, including the introduction of some innovative water sensitive urban design technologies and use of the Design Review Panel.

Wright and Coombs achieved EnviroDevelopment reaccreditation from the Urban Development Institute of Australia (UDIA). Accreditation was also achieved for ‘Scope’, the demonstration precinct at Coombs, which is the first to achieve all six EnviroDevelopment ‘leaves’ in the ACT.

The LDA has also been a sponsor of the Green Star – Communities rating tool being developed by the Green Building Council of Australia. This is a national scheme to assess the sustainability of community-level projects and the LDA is piloting the tool in Lawson and West Belconnen.

Financial outcome

The LDA’s total income and profits in 2013-14 while lower than the levels achieved in the previous financial year continue to be significant. Total income was $269.2 million ($322.4 million in 2012-13) and profit before tax of $95.2 million ($155.0 million in 2012-13). The change from 2012-13 was primarily due to a decrease in land sales revenue. The LDA achieved $235.9 million in land sales revenue in 2013-14, which was $26.9 million lower than 2012-13. There were decreased sales in LDA estates, including Bonner, Harrison 4, Jacka and Wright estates and lower demand in the commercial sector, partially offset by increased sales in Coombs, Amaroo and Kingston Foreshore.

This decrease was primarily due to lower than anticipated land sales settlements, partially offset by a higher share of operating profit from joint ventures.

As at 30 June 2014, the LDA had exchanged sales contracts totalling $331.6 million, the majority of which are scheduled to settle in 2014-15. This level of carry forward of exchanged contracts demonstrates the scale of the LDA’s activities and achievements during 2013-14. As a consequence, the LDA remains in a strong position to continue to make a significant contribution to the Territory’s finances in 2014-15.

Community engagement

As part of our commitment to building a better Canberra with the community, the Directorate has improved upon and increased its focus on community engagement activities to keep Canberrans informed. This has been done by using both online and traditional tools to communicate and ensure that information is provided in a timely manner, as well as providing on-going advice where required, on matters of interest. Advertising and information dissemination, as well as the usual engagement activities, were undertaken in relation to future land releases, road works and other development associated activities were also undertaken.

The LDA’s community engagement activities play a vital role in producing a range of high quality opportunities for residential, commercial and industrial, community and non-urban development across the ACT.

Greater engagement with LDA project teams and community councils across the ACT has lead to improved outcomes for the both LDA and the community. Consistent with the ACT Government’s commitment to the principles of ‘open government’, all community engagement is evaluated against the key performance indicators of engaging with the community in a meaningful, accountable, responsive and equitable way. Evaluation identifies improvements to engagement practises and allows best practice models to be developed.

Community engagement activities included:

  • Campbell 5 works/remediation;
  • Canberra Brickworks + Environs Planning and Development Strategy;
  • Blocks 40 and 41 Section 6 Dickson redevelopment;
  • Southquay Greenway development;
  • Block 19 Section 10 and Block 2 Section 11 Higgins release and redevelopment options;
  • Block 21 Section 45 Holder Proposed Territory Plan Variation;
  • Block 1 Section 443 Kambah (former Village Creek Primary School) preparation of site for release;
  • Section 239 Kambah (former Urambi Primary School) preparation of site for release;
  • Kingston Former Transport Depot remediation;
  • Lawson remediation works;
  • Section 3 Parkes development;
  • Block 16 Section 3 Phillip redevelopment;
  • Throsby Master plan;
  • Block 1 Section 115 and Block 8 Section 1 Symonston Proposed Territory Plan Variation; and
  • Block 9 Section 64 Watson Environment Protection Biodiversity Conservation (EPBC) Process.

The LDA again hosted the Canberra International Music Festival event at Kingston Foreshore, with strong positive feedback from Kingston residents and the broader Canberra Community. The Mingle program also has proved its success in building vibrant communities in Gungahlin and the program was rolled out in the Molonglo suburbs of Wright and Coombs in 2013-14. The program is tailored for each suburb to suit demographics, resident feedback and proximity to surrounding services.

I would like to finish by acknowledging the contribution of the LDA Board Chair and all Board Members.

I would also like to acknowledge the hard working staff within the LDA for their enthusiastic and positive contribution throughout 2013-14.

David Dawes Chief Executive Officer

FUTURE PRIORITIES

In June 2014, the ACT Government published its 2014-15 to 2017-18 Indicative Land Release Program, which sets out the Government’s intended program of residential, commercial, industrial and community land releases over the next four years.

The program includes a four year-residential target of 13,500 dwelling sites – 4,500 fewer dwellings sites than the previous four year program.  This reduction, achieved predominately by delaying the release of sites for apartments, reflects anticipated easing in the Territory’s population growth rate and easing housing demand as a result of Commonwealth Government spending cuts.

However, the Government, through the LDA, remains committed to achieving an inventory of serviced land and will make every effort to ensure land is made available to meet demand as it arises.

Recent sales results in areas such as Campbell and Lawson indicate there is still confidence in Canberra’s property markets. 

The LDA’s key deliverables for 2014-15 are to:

  • deliver the Government’s Indicative Land Release Program (ILRP) for residential, commercial, industrial and community land uses;
  • provide timely support for direct sales of land by the Government;
  • support the delivery of urban intensification along the Capital Metro corridor;
  • deliver high quality, sustainable developments, including public realm and community development;
  • provide a variety of land and housing options that set benchmarks for quality and timeliness in sustainable building and design;
  • contribute to diversity in the supply of new housing in the Territory, reflective of current and anticipated demographic change; and
  • pursue development opportunities where such opportunities would be consistent with the Government’s policy framework for land acquisitions.

B.2. Performance Analysis

2013-14 Objective 1

Ensure that an adequate supply of greenfield and brownfield land will be maintained to meet market demand for residential, commercial, industrial and community uses.

The four-year Residential Indicative Land Release Program is intended to satisfy underlying housing demand as well as meeting the additional demand for detached housing in greenfield estates. In addition, the release program is intended to allow the Land Development Agency to establish an inventory of serviced land and meet additional demand generated by the Government’s affordable housing initiatives, including the Land Rent Scheme.

In 2013-14, the Land Development Agency released 3,299 dwelling sites to the market. This compared with a target of 4,800 in the Indicative Land Release Program. The main reasons for this shortfall were:

  • delay in achieving necessary planning clearances for 600 dwelling sites in Throsby and Downer; and
  • the deferral of the release of sites for 1,050 apartments on Sections 21, 22, 23 and 152 Belconnen due to the existing supply of available apartments in the Belconnen Town Centre.

Major residential land releases in 2013-14 included:

  • Moncrieff – 500 dwelling.
  • Campbell – 528 dwellings.
  • Lawson – 674 dwellings.
  • Greenway – 306 dwellings.
  • Coombs – 392 dwellings.

Residential land releases were also made in Harrison, Franklin, Amaroo, Bonner, Ngunnawal, Crace, Watson and Kingston.

The Commercial Indicative Land Release Program includes a supply of mixed use commercial land predominately to support the demand for infill housing and related commercial properties.  The LDA released 74,585 sqm of commercial land in 2013-14, against a target of 122,438 sqm. The main reasons for this shortfall were:

  • the delay of large apartment sites in the Belconnen Town Centre as mentioned earlier, which included 28,581 sqm for commercial development;
  • the delay of 8,550 sqm on Section 19 Kingston due to the ongoing negotiation to consolidate the site with the adjoining service station;
  • the delay of 10,391 sqm on part Section 24 Stirling to allow for a Territory Plan variation to be finalised; and
  • the delay of site 10 at Kingston Foreshore, 10,309 sqm due to decontamination issues.

Major Commercial Land Releases in 2013-14 included:

  • Amaroo 6,107 sqm.
  • Franklin 21,348 sqm.
  • Greenway 17,948 sqm.
  • Kingston 15,114 sqm.
  • Campbell 21,473 sqm.

The Industrial Indicative Land Release Program in recent years has resulted in the demand for industrial land being met and an inventory of serviced land established. As at 30 June 2014, the LDA held an inventory of 15 industrial blocks totalling 80,487 sqm of industrial land. No industrial land was released in 2013-14.

The Community Facility and Non-Urban land release program continues to supply a large volume of land required to support community needs arising from Canberra’s urban growth. 161,697 sqm was released in 2013-14 against a target of 98,929 sqm. The actual volume of land released by direct sale can vary significantly, as the release of many sites is subject to acceptance of an offer by the proponent or a development application approval. The principal community land release in 2013-14 was 146,553 sqm for a tourist facility in Gungahlin.

2013-14 Objective 2

Contribute to the delivery of the Government’s policies and priorities related to affordable housing, sustainability, climate change and urban intensification.

Affordable Housing

All Land Development Agency greenfield estates met the Government’s policy of delivering 20 per cent affordable housing in 2013-14. This was achieved in the Flemington Road and Coombs developments via Performance Delivery Agreements that required no less than 20 per cent of dwellings constructed to be sold at or below the affordable housing thresholds provided in the Affordable Housing Action Plan.

Land Rent – In accordance with the Government’s Affordable Housing Action Plan, the Land Development Agency also provides the option for eligible purchasers of land in residential estates to take up a Land Rent Lease. 

As part of the 2013-14 Budget, the Government announced that, from 1 October 2013, the Land Rent Scheme would be retargeted to moderate income households.  This means that land released by the LDA since October 2013 can only be leased under the Land Rent Scheme by lessees who meet the eligibility criteria for the Land Rent Scheme discount rate.  That is, the household’s income, where there are no dependent children, must not exceed $160,000; the lessee must reside in the property; and the lessee cannot own other real estate.  This also effectively means that businesses are no longer able to obtain new land under the Land Rent Scheme.

Under these changes, once a lessee exceeds the eligibility criteria for two consecutive years, they are now required to either convert their Land Rent Scheme lease to a standard crown lease, or transfer the property to another eligible lessee.  These changes to the Land Rent Scheme do not apply retroactively, and Land Rent Scheme leases for blocks released prior to October 2013 continue to operate under the same terms and conditions as they did originally.

Housing Affordability Fund – Building on the success of the Land Development Agency’s previous Commonwealth Housing Affordability Fund agreements, the agency invested in further affordable housing at Crace and Harrison.  The total $13.9 million allocated, has now been spent.

Sustainability and Climate Change

The Land Development Agency has continued to incorporate the principles of ecologically sustainable development into its activities. Sustainability data is collated from all Land Development Agency projects covering eight key themes:

  • energy and emissions;
  • water;
  • landscape and biodiversity;
  • waste and materials;
  • influencing design;
  • community;
  • transport; and
  • affordability.

This reporting gives an indication of sustainability measures undertaken by the Land Development Agency, including the introduction of innovative water sensitive urban design technologies and use of the Design Review Panel.

A detailed report on sustainability measures is available at B.4.

Wright and Coombs achieved EnviroDevelopment reaccreditation from the Urban Development Institute of Australia (UDIA). Accreditation was also achieved for ‘Scope’, the demonstration precinct at Coombs, which is the first to achieve all six EnviroDevelopment ‘leaves’ in the ACT.

The Land Development Agency has also been a sponsor of the Green Star – Communities rating tool being developed by the Green Building Council of Australia. This is a national scheme to assess the sustainability of community-level projects and the Land Development Agency is piloting the tool in Lawson and West Belconnen.

2013-14 Objective 3

Adopt a ‘One Government’ approach during the land development process through the cultivation and maintenance of productive relationships across the ACT Government.

The Land Development Agency worked closely with the Economic Development Directorate and other relevant directorates to provide technical input to several inter-directorate working groups and committees that assist in coordinating land delivery.  This includes: the Infrastructure and Capital Works Working Group to improve the integration of design management and delivery of capital works with estate works; the Pipeline Constraints and Supply Working Group to identify and resolve blockages and constraints to timely land release; the Demand Analysis and Monitoring Working Group; and the Land Supply Committee.

The Land Development Agency also provided detailed technical advice to assist in resolving land development issues with the Commonwealth, on sites such as Ngunnawal 2C, Bonner 4, Campbell Section 5 and Watson, especially in relation to obtaining environmental clearances under the Commonwealth’s Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999.

2013-14 Objective 4

Operate efficiently in the markets in which it operates and provide agreed returns to the Territory on its investment in the agency.

Land Development Agency land sales revenue for 2013-14 totalled $235.9 million.

As at 30 June 2014, the value of exchanged contracts held by the LDA was $331.6 million (ex GST), of which $233.3 million are scheduled to settle in 2014-15.

The Land Development Agency's overall Return to Government for 2013-14 (including Dividend and returns on land sales) totalled $153 million.

2013-14 Objective 5

Ensure that key commercial decisions on land in the ACT are made with due consideration to the sustainability of the Territory (that is by balancing economic, social and environmental factors).

The Land Development Agency ensures its key commercial decisions on land are made with due consideration to the sustainability of the Territory by identifying and integrating economic, social and environmental factors into decision-making. These elements are set out in the project business plans that are reviewed by the Design Review Panel, and approved by the Land Development Agency Board for all major developments.

2013-14 Objective 6

Engage the community in a timely manner in the land development process and continue to improve community engagement processes for redevelopments.

Greater engagement between project teams and community councils across the ACT has led to improved outcomes for the both the Land Development Agency and the community. Consistent with the ACT Government’s commitment to the principles of ‘open government’, all community engagement is evaluated against the key performance indicators of engaging with the community in a meaningful, accountable, responsive and equitable way. Evaluation identifies improvements to engagement practices and allows best practice models to be developed.

See also section B.3 for more information on community engagement.

Further information may be obtained from:

Director, Office of the Chief Executive Phone: (02) 6205 2697

B.3. Community Engagement and Support

Mingle Program Overview 2013-14

The Land Development Agency approach to community engagement is based on the ACT Government Guideline, Engaging Canberrans: A Guide to Community Engagement. Community engagement is a function delivered by the Economic Development Directorate, through the Memorandum of Understanding between the two agencies.

The LDA continues to implement its community development program Mingle, which is designed to build vibrant local communities within new LDA estates. The program aims to achieve a number of social objectives based around the notion of encouraging new residents to feel part of the community and become involved in community life and activities. Mingle ultimately assists residents to create networks, groups and programs that will become self-sustaining.

The program is tailored for each suburb to suit demographics, resident feedback and proximity to surrounding services. The LDA continues to work closely with other ACT Government Directorates to help meet program objectives and to deliver events.

In 2013-14 the Mingle program was launched in Molonglo Valley (Wright and Coombs) with six community events conducted including the Launch Workshop, Brunch in the Park, Fitness Classes, Skills and Drills day with the ACT Brumbies and a tree planting day with Greening Australia. The participation of residents was considerable given the relatively low number of occupied houses in these suburbs. The LDA has engaged a Community Development Officer through Communities@Work to assist with planning and delivery of the Mingle program in Wright and Coombs. The level of community development activities will increase in line with the number of residents moving into the Molonglo Valley.

The program was continued in Bonner with five community events organised in 2013-14. Events included a photography competition, Trivia Night, Emergency Services Day, Party at the Shops and support for the Neville Bonner Primary School’s Car Boot Sale. The Mingle program supported activities of local community organisations including Communities@Work and My Gungahlin.

The Mingle program was concluded in Franklin in 2013-14 with the last community event, the Bike Safety Brunch, held in November 2013. Mingle continues to support community initiatives in Franklin including sponsorship of the Neighbourhood Watch Newsletter.

Activities across Franklin, Bonner, Wright and Coombs were supported by quarterly newsletters, online communications, letterbox delivery and social media.

In May 2014 the LDA hosted the third annual Canberra International Music Festival at Kingston Foreshore. The LDA delivered this event with support from the Canberra International Music Festival. The Festival has helped to foster community development for local residents as well as showcasing Kingston Foreshore to the wider Canberra community as it evolves. The 2014 event was weather affected however still managed to attract over 1,500 people throughout the afternoon. The event is planned to be included in the Canberra International Music Festival suite of events for May 2015.

The LDA also initiated a “Commemorate our past, name our future” park naming competition in Kingston Foreshore which encouraged entrants to suggest names for a park located along Eastlake Parade. Public spaces throughout Kingston are named in honour of explorers and pioneers who have made a significant contribution to Canberra’s history. The winning entry identified Jack Ross who originally emigrated from Scotland and moved to Canberra in 1937 where he lived in Kingston. He is recognised for his community contribution including his role as the founding Pipe Major of the Canberra Burns Club Pipe Band.

Band playing at Kingston foreshore

Music Festival at Kingston Foreshore

Community Consultation/Engagement Overview 2013-14

As part of our commitment to building a better Canberra with the community, the LDA has improved upon and increased its focus on community engagement activities to keep Canberrans informed. This has been done by using both online and traditional tools to communicate and ensure that information is provided in a timely manner, as well as providing ongoing advice where required, on matters of interest. Advertising and information dissemination, as well as the usual engagement activities, were undertaken in relation to future land releases, road works and other development associated activities were also undertaken.

PROJECT: Campbell 5 works/remediation

The purpose of this engagement was to inform the community and relevant stakeholders of a number of works that occurred in preparation for the release of Section 5 Campbell. This engagement was undertaken on behalf of the Urban Renewal Branch.

Tools used to engage the community included letters and project update newsletters to the North Canberra Community Council (NCCC) and residents and businesses in Campbell and a portion of Reid; LDA web updates; LDA and EDD social media; ACT Government Community Noticeboard press; ACT Government Time to Talk website; and signage.

Outcome: Residential and Commercial development in June 2014.

PROJECT: Canberra Brickworks + Environs Planning and Development Strategy

The purpose of this engagement was to inform and consult with the community and relevant stakeholders regarding the Canberra Brickworks + Environs Planning and Development Strategy. This engagement was undertaken on behalf of the Urban Renewal Branch.

Tools used to engage the community included letters and project update newsletters to the Inner South Canberra Community Council (ISCCC), Yarralumla and Deakin Residents’ Association and residents and businesses in Yarralumla, Deakin and Curtin; LDA and EDD web updates; LDA and EDD social media; ACT Government Community Noticeboard press; ACT Government Time to Talk website; Project Reference Group; information sessions; Open day and guided tours; and signage.

Outcome: Community consultation is ongoing for this project.

PROJECT: Blocks 40 and 41 Section 6 Dickson Redevelopment

The purpose of this engagement was to inform the community and relevant stakeholders of the proposed redevelopment of Blocks 40 and 41 Section 6 Dickson and the lodgement of a Development Application. This engagement was undertaken on behalf of the Urban Renewal Branch.

Tools used to engage the community included letters to the NCCC, Dickson Resident’s Association and residents and businesses in close proximity to the site; presentations to key stakeholders including ACT Heritage Council; LDA and EDD web updates; LDA and EDD social media; ACT Government Community Noticeboard press; ACT Government Time to Talk website; and signage.

Outcome: Community engagement is ongoing for this project.

PROJECT: Block 4 Section 61 Downer Redevelopment

The purpose of this engagement was to inform and consult with the community and relevant stakeholders on the proposed redevelopment of Block 4 Section 61 Downer. This engagement was undertaken on behalf of the Urban Renewal Branch.

Tools used to engage the community included letters to the NCCC, Downer Residents’ Association and residents and businesses in Downer and in close proximity to the site; presentations to key stakeholders; meetings with Downer Reference Group; LDA and EDD web updates; LDA and EDD social media; ACT Government Community Noticeboard press; ACT Government Time to Talk website; signage.

Outcome: This site has been an ongoing joint venture between ACT Government and the Downer community. The site is currently under negotiation by direct sale to an organisation which is also a part of the Downer Reference Group work group.

Outcome: Community engagement is ongoing for this project.

PROJECT: Southquay Greenway Development

The purpose of this engagement was to inform the community and relevant stakeholders of the development of Southquay in Greenway. This engagement was undertaken on behalf of the Urban Renewal Branch.

Tools used to engage the community included letters to the Tuggeranong Community Council (TCC), residents and businesses in close proximity to the site and patrons and employees of the Tuggeranong Hyperdome; presentations to key stakeholders; LDA and EDD web updates; LDA and EDD social media; ACT Government Community Noticeboard press; ACT Government Time to Talk website; and signage.

Outcome: Two sites sold in March 2014 and community engagement will be ongoing for this project.

PROJECT: Block 19 Section 10 and Block 2 Section 11 Higgins Release and Redevelopment Options

The purpose of this engagement was to inform and consult with the community and relevant stakeholders regarding the former Higgins school site and decommissioned oval and options for redevelopment and release. This engagement was undertaken on behalf of the Urban Renewal Branch.

Tools used to engage the community included letters to the Belconnen Community Council (BCC), residents and businesses in Higgins and within close proximity to the site, and Ginninderra MLAs; presentations to key stakeholders; drop-in information sessions; facilitated workshop; LDA and EDD web updates; LDA and EDD social media; ACT Government Community Noticeboard press; ACT Government Time to Talk website; and signage.

Outcome: Community engagement report pending.

PROJECT: Block 21 Section 45 Holder Proposed Territory Plan Variation

The purpose of this engagement was to inform and consult with the community and relevant stakeholders regarding Block 21 Section 45 Holder and options for redevelopment and release. This engagement was undertaken on behalf of the Direct Sales team.

Tools used to engage the community included letters to the Weston Creek Community Council (WCCC), residents and businesses in Holder and within close proximity to the site; drop-in information sessions; LDA and EDD web updates; LDA and EDD social media; engagement with Montessori School; ACT Government Community Noticeboard press; ACT Government Time to Talk website; and signage.

Outcome: Community engagement report pending.

PROJECT: Block 1 Section 443 Kambah (former Village Creek Primary School) preparation of site for release

The purpose of this engagement was to inform the community and relevant stakeholders of the intention to lodge a Development Application with the Environment and Sustainable Development Directorate for the demolition of Section 443 Kambah in preparation for the release of the site. This engagement was undertaken on behalf of the Urban Renewal Branch.

Tools used to engage the community included letters to the Tuggeranong Community Council (TCC) and residents and businesses in close proximity to the site; EDD web updates; EDD social media; ACT Government Community Noticeboard press; ACT Government Time to Talk website; and signage.

Outcome: These activities were for information purposes and further engagement will be undertaken as the project progresses.

PROJECT: Section 239 Kambah (former Urambi Primary School) preparation of site for release

The purpose of this engagement was to inform the community and relevant stakeholders of the intention to lodge a Development Application with the Environment and Sustainable Development Directorate for the demolition of Section 239 Kambah in preparation for the release of the site. This engagement was undertaken on behalf of the Urban Renewal Branch.

Tools used to engage the community included letters to the TCC and residents and businesses in close proximity to the site; EDD web updates; EDD social media; ACT Government Community Noticeboard press; ACT Government Time to Talk website; and signage.

Outcome: These activities were for information purposes and further engagement will be undertaken as the project progresses.

PROJECT: Kingston Former Transport Depot Remediation

The purpose of this engagement was to inform the community and relevant stakeholders of the remediation works that were being undertaken on the Former Transport Depot in Kingston. This engagement was undertaken on behalf of the Estate Development Branch, Kingston Foreshore team.

Tools used to engage the community included letters to the ISCCC, Old Bus Depot Market stall holders, Kingston and Barton Resident’s Group (KBRG) and residents and businesses in close proximity to the site; briefings to key stakeholders including the Old Bus Depot Market stall holders; EDD and LDA web updates; EDD and LDA social media; ACT Government Community Noticeboard press; ACT Government Time to Talk website; and signage.

Outcome: These activities were for information purposes and further engagement will be undertaken as the project progresses. The roof replacement works were completed successfully and the second stage of works are now underway.

PROJECT: Lawson Remediation works

The purpose of this engagement was to inform the community and relevant stakeholders of a number of works that were occurring in preparation for the release of Lawson. This engagement was undertaken on behalf of the Estate Development Branch.

Tools used to engage the community included letters to the BCC and residents, schools and businesses in close proximity to the site; LDA and EDD web updates; LDA and EDD social media; ACT Government Community Noticeboard press; ACT Government Time to Talk website; and signage.

Outcome: Remediation works occurred successfully and all blocks offered for sale were sold during 2013-14.

PROJECT: Section 3 Parkes Development

The purpose of this engagement was to inform and consult with the community and relevant stakeholders regarding the future development of Section 3 Parkes. This engagement was undertaken on behalf of the Urban Renewal Branch.

Tools used to engage the community included letters to the NCCC, residents and businesses in Reid and Campbell, Canberra Institute of Technology Reid students and car park users; stakeholder briefing; drop-in information sessions; LDA and EDD web updates; LDA and EDD social media; ACT Government Community Noticeboard press; ACT Government Time to Talk website; and signage.

Outcome: This project is ongoing.

PROJECT: Block 16 Section 3 Phillip Redevelopment

The purpose of this engagement was to inform the community and relevant stakeholders of the closure of the car park and redevelopment of Block 16 Section 3 Phillip. This engagement was undertaken on behalf of the Urban Renewal Branch.

Tools used to engage the community included letters to the Woden Valley Community Council (WVCC), surrounding business owners and tenants and car park users; LDA and EDD web updates; LDA and EDD social media; ACT Government Community Noticeboard press; ACT Government Time to Talk website; and signage.

Outcome: This site was sold as Mixed Use in April 2013 and engagement activities continued until the site was closed.

PROJECT: Throsby Master plan

The purpose of this engagement was to inform the community and relevant stakeholders of the Master Plan and planned release of Throsby. This engagement was undertaken on behalf of the Estate Development Branch.

Tools used to engage the community included a letter to the Gungahlin Community Council (GCC); presentations to the GCC, The Bush on the Boundary Reference Group and Mulligans Flat Nature Reserve Board; LDA and EDD web updates; LDA and EDD social media; ACT Government Community Noticeboard press; ACT Government Time to Talk website; and signage.

Outcome: These activities were for information purposes and further engagement may be undertaken as the project progresses.

PROJECT: Block 1 Section 115 and Block 8 Section 1 Symonston Proposed Territory Plan Variation

The purpose of this engagement was to inform and consult with the community and relevant stakeholders regarding a proposed Territory Plan Variation for Block 1 Section 115 and Block 8 Section 1 Symonston. This engagement was undertaken on behalf of the Estate Development Branch.

Tools used to engage the community included letters to the ISCCC, TCC and residents, businesses and tenants within close proximity to the site; drop-in information sessions; LDA and EDD web updates; LDA and EDD social media; ACT Government Community Noticeboard press; ACT Government Time to Talk website; and signage.

Outcome: Non-contentious site that has been added to the Omnibus Territory Plan Variation Process for late 2014.

PROJECT: Block 9 Section 64 Watson Environment Protection Biodiversity Conservation (EPBC) Act Process

The purpose of this engagement was to notify the community and relevant stakeholders of the EPBC Act process for Block 9 Section 64 Watson in preparation for the release of the site. This engagement was undertaken on behalf of the Urban Renewal Branch.

Tools used to engage the community included letters to the NCCC, Watson Residents Association, Friends of Mount Majura and residents and businesses in close proximity to the site; presentation to the NCCC; EDD web updates; EDD social media; ACT Government Community Noticeboard press; Public Notices; ACT Government Time to Talk website; and signage.

Outcome: The EPBC Act process was completed and the site was sold for Residential purposes in February 2014.

GRANTS/ASSISTANCE/SPONSORSHIP

RecipientProjectProject PurposeAmount
University of CanberraConstruction Research ProjectCo-funded construction and waste minimisation research project.$5,000
Australian National UniversityPhD scholarship funding.Maintenance of hollow bearing trees in urban developments including assessing the effectiveness of nesting boxes replacing hollow bearing trees.$16,500

Further information may be obtained from:

Director, Office of the Chief Executive Phone: (02) 6205 2697

B.4. Ecologically Sustainable Development

Background

Each year the LDA comprehensively reports on sustainability in its core business – land development. This approach covers environmental, social and economic considerations in LDA operations, thus helping to address the principles of Ecologically Sustainable Development.

The 2013-14 LDA SOI outlined a commitment by the LDA to ‘contribute to the delivery of the Government’s policies and priorities related to affordable housing, sustainability, climate change and urban intensification’ and to ‘ensure that key commercial decisions on land in the ACT are made with due consideration to the sustainability of the Territory (that is by balancing economic, social and environmental factors)’. The SOI also included six non-financial Key Performance Indicators (KPIs). In this section of the Annual Report, the LDA is addressing the KPIs covering urban water cycle management, biodiversity and landscape and design excellence. The KPIs regarding housing affordability and sustainable community programs are also partially addressed in this section.

In 2013-14 the LDA has continued to focus on delivering urban intensification in a sustainable way in line with ACT Government targets. Of the projects reported on in this section, more than half are located in existing urban areas. These sites help to increase density in town centres and along transport corridors, and provide a diversity of housing options for Canberra. In many of these sites the LDA needs to balance complex requirements such as decontamination and the creation of quality urban open spaces.

The LDA also has a number of achievements that have received industry recognition. Wright and Coombs have received recertification under the ecosystems, energy, waste and community categories of the Urban Development Institute of Australia (UDIA) EnviroDevelopment program. The design and planning for the Molonglo Demonstration Precinct, located in Coombs, achieved all six EnviroDevelopment categories including materials and water. This was the first project in the ACT to achieve all six categories.

Lawson and West Belconnen are registered pilot projects for the Green Star – Communities rating tool developed by the Green Building Council of Australia (GBCA). This is a national scheme to assess the sustainability of community-level projects. The LDA, with other Government land organisations, has been a sponsor of the tool.

Sustainability Themes

The LDA has identified the following key sustainability themes for reporting in its projects:

  • energy and emissions;
  • water;
  • landscape and biodiversity;
  • waste and materials;
  • influencing design;
  • community;
  • transport; and
  • affordability.

Panorama of a Canberra suburb

A swale in Bonner. When it rains this helps to slow the flow of water and improve water quality.

Reporting Phases

LDA projects progress through a process of development. Different stages of this process have been targeted as Reporting Phases. The four Phases cover the major steps that are necessary for an area of land to be developed and sold, and are divided by key Milestones.

Reporting Phase Process

Due Diligence Phase Reporting

The Due Diligence Phase refers to projects where due diligence procedures are being undertaken to ensure the land is ready for development (for example ecological, contamination and other studies). These processes influence ‘where, what and how’ development will occur on each site. This Phase includes LDA projects that have yet to reach sale or Business Plan Approval for 2013-14.

In 2013-14, 36 sites were reported within the Due Diligence Phase. This includes three sites for which the LDA undertook assessments on behalf of the Economic Development Directorate.

Planning Phase Reporting

The Planning Phase includes LDA projects where more detailed planning is underway. This Phase includes projects that are between Business Plan Approval and Estate Development Plan Approval for 2013-14.

In 2013-14, seven LDA projects were reported within the Planning Phase.

Civil Works Phase Reporting

The Civil Works Phase refers to projects where planning is complete but civil works and landscaping activities are underway. This Phase includes LDA projects that are between Estate Development Plan Approval and handover of assets for 2013-14.

In 2013–14, seven LDA projects were reported within the Civil Works Phase.

Post Occupancy Phase Reporting

The Post Occupancy Phase refers to projects where civil works have been completed, assets have been handed over, and people are living or working in the area. LDA projects are reported in this Phase until the end of LDA involvement.

In 2013-14, six LDA projects were reported within the Post Occupancy Phase.

Projects Reported in 2013–14

The following table indicates each project and its reporting Phase/s for 2013–14.

Project NameType of DevelopmentApprox Total Site Area (ha)Due DiligencePlanningCivil WorksPost Occupancy
Amaroo Group CentreMixed Use4.3   X
Belconnen Lathlain St PrecinctResidential, Commercial, Community2.5X   
Belconnen Section 48Mixed Use1.9X   
Belconnen Section 149Mixed Use1.6X   
Belconnen Section 152Mixed Use, Residential0.6X   
BonnerResidential suburb230.9   X
Campbell 5Mixed Use, Residential6.4  X 
Canberra Brickworks + EnvironsMixed Use, Residential42X   
CoombsResidential suburb79  X 
Denman Prospect Stage 1AResidential suburb53 X  
Denman Prospect Stage 1B, 2 and 3Residential suburb328X   
Dickson Section 72Community, Residential3.5X   
FranklinResidential suburb200.7   X
Fyshwick Section 45Industrial98X   
Fyshwick Section 47Industrial36X   
Gungahlin Town Centre EastMixed Use38X   
Hume New WestIndustrial56  X 
Jacka 1Residential suburb19   X
Jacka NorthResidential suburb173X   
KennyResidential suburb352X   
Kingston ForeshoreHigh density residential, Commercial44.5XXXX
Lawson Stage 1Residential suburb50  X 
Lawson Stage 2Mixed Use, Residential30 X  
MolongloResidential suburb116X   
Molonglo Demonstration PrecinctResidential1.6 X  
Molonglo 3Residential suburbTBCX   
MoncrieffResidential suburb191 X  
Northbourne Avenue CorridorMixed Use, Residential6.55X   
Parkes Section 3Mixed Use3.4 X  
PialligoIndustrialTBCX   
SouthQuay GreenwayMixed Use, Residential24  X 
SymonstonIndustrial37X   
TaylorResidential suburb302X   
ThrosbyResidential suburb106X   
West BelconnenMixed Use, Residential1600X   
Woden Furzer St PrecinctMixed Use2.35 X  
WrightResidential suburb80  XX
Urban ReleasesVarious single block or section releases 15 sites   
Total LDA Projects Reported in 2013–14 36776

 

Notes:

It is important to note that the planning and land development process often occurs over several years. Accordingly, many projects will report on the same Phase for two or more consecutive years.

The number of projects reported within any given year can vary significantly in response to the ILRP. This must be considered when undertaking any comparisons between reporting periods.

A project may be divided into different stages for reporting if some areas are at a different Phase to other areas. For example a project may have some areas where civil works are still being conducted while residents have moved into other areas. This is the case with Jacka, where Stage 1 has progressed to the Post Occupancy Phase, while Jacka North is still in the Due Diligence Phase.

Equivalents to key milestones may be used as alternatives in some cases. For example, approval by the National Capital Authority may be used as an alternative to Estate Development Plan approval for projects in designated areas.

A number of projects crossed key Milestones during 2013–14. If the Milestone (such as Estate Development Plan approval) occurred during the financial year the project was required to report on whichever Phase applied for the majority of the given financial year. If the Milestone occurred close to halfway through the financial year then the project was required to report on both applicable Phases.

Work on a number of new projects also commenced during 2013–14. These projects have now been included for sustainability reporting.

Some LDA sites are sold as englobo sites after the Due Diligence Phase. Therefore, not all projects will proceed from the Due Diligence Phase to the Planning Phase. In these cases, once the project has progressed through the Due Diligence Phase, this is regarded as the end of LDA involvement.

The LDA also engages in Joint Venture projects that are largely managed by the Joint Venture Partner. LDA involvement is reduced following Business Plan approval, with Business Plans being approved by the Joint Venture Management Committee rather than the LDA Board. For these reasons, Joint Venture Projects have not been reported against in 2013–14.

Sustainability Indicators

The LDA has developed a selection of indicators to be used for reporting on environmental, social and economic sustainability during the land development process. Indicators reflect on non-financial operations that the LDA controls and influences directly. The indicators are grouped by theme and separated by Reporting Phases. Projects within an individual Phase will only report on the indicators directly related to that Phase.

2011–12 was the first time that this approach to sustainability reporting had been used by the LDA in the Annual Report. Evaluation of the indicators has taken place each year, resulting in some amendments and additions.

 Due Diligence (DD)Planning (PL)Civil Works (CW)Post Occupancy (PO)
Energy and emissions Solar access

Public lighting

Rebate schemes or mandates

 
WaterCatchment management analysis and/or flooding studiesWater Sensitive Urban Design (WSUD)Sediment and erosion controlWSUD monitoring
Landscape and biodiversity

Ecological assessments

Tree assessments

Contamination studies

Geotechnical assessments

Bushfire risk assessments

Public open space

Protection of threatened species, populations and ecological communities

Protection or management of identified areas of ecological importance

Tree protection

Weed and pest control

 
Waste and materials  

Cut and fill minimisation

Recycled or reused materials

 
Influencing design Design Review Panel Project evaluation
Community

Community engagement

Heritage assessments

Noise assessments

Community engagementProtection or management of identified areas of heritage importanceResidential community programs
TransportTraffic and parking assessments

Public transport proximity

Pedestrian and cycle networks and facilities

Area of roads

  
Affordability Planning for affordability 

Affordable dwellings

Land Rent blocks

Energy and Emissions

Reporting PhaseIndicators2011–122012–132013–14
PLPercentage of LDA projects that comply with or exceed solar access requirements100%100%100%
CWPercentage of LDA projects that comply with or exceed public lighting energy efficiency standards100%100%100%
CWLDA projects that used rebate schemes or mandates to encourage use of efficient appliances and hot water5 projects4 projects4 projects

Solar Access

Solar access requirements are outlined in the Territory Plan. In all LDA estates, the layout and orientation of streets and blocks are designed to facilitate good solar access once dwellings have been built.

Public Lighting

Public lighting in LDA projects must meet energy efficient design standards. Several LDA projects have promoted or trialled energy efficient lighting above usual standards.

In Stage 1 of Lawson, street lights are being installed to allow for LED luminaires.

Rebate Schemes or Mandates

Rebate schemes or mandates have been used in some LDA residential estates to encourage the use of efficient appliances and hot water systems.

Rebates for the installation of energy efficient heating and cooling systems have continued to be offered to residents in Wright and Coombs. In Stage 1 of Lawson, a rebate will apply to energy meters for single residential dwellings. The LDA has also continued to offer a rebate scheme for the industrial estate at Hume New West.

Water

Reporting PhaseIndicators2011–122012–132013–14
DDNumber of catchment management analysis and/or flooding studies conducted for LDA projects4 (catchment management only)108
PLPercentage of LDA projects with WSUD strategies appropriate to the size and location of the projects100%100%100%
CWPercentage of LDA projects that have met or exceeded sediment and erosion control requirements100%100%100%
POLDA projects that have post occupancy water monitoring110

Catchment Management Analysis and Flooding Studies

Catchment management analysis studies assess a development’s impact on drainage, existing water bodies or water courses and ground water. In 2012–13 this indicator was amended to include flooding studies. Flooding studies are conducted for smaller development sites to assess potential flooding risks and the impact that development may have on flooding.

Water Sensitive Urban Design

Water sensitive urban design (WSUD) is included in all new developments under the Territory Plan, as part of the ACT Government’s broader strategy of responsible water resource management. WSUD seeks to use a more sustainable approach by integrating water management into urban development.

In the 2013–14 LDA SOI, a non-financial KPI required all LDA projects to have a specific WSUD strategy appropriate to the size and location of the project. This target has been achieved with all LDA projects reported during the Planning Phase having WSUD strategies in place.

In Parkes Section 3, on street rain gardens are proposed to deliver WSUD targets. Other initiatives are currently being explored through the development of the Preliminary Sketch Plan design.

The LDA has installed a range of different innovative WSUD technologies to assist in filtering stormwater runoff and improving water quality. This includes Stratacell™ at the Amaroo Group Centre and Hydrocon™ in Wright and Coombs.

Sediment and Erosion Controls

Sediment and erosion controls help to ensure that no pollutants run off from a site. Pollutants can contribute to environmental degradation and the devastation of terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems.

Sediment ponds, silt fences and stormwater diversions are examples of sediment and erosion control methods used in LDA projects. For example in Kingston Foreshore, stormwater upstream of work sites has been diverted and earth has been compacted to avoid run off.

Post Occupancy Water Monitoring

None of the projects in the Post Occupancy Phase had water monitoring actively undertaken by the LDA in 2013–14. One of the projects, Kingston Foreshore, has had water monitoring undertaken previously and on average met or exceeded the modelled water quality targets. However this monitoring was not continued for 2013–14. The LDA is investigating options for other water monitoring in the future, including linkages with other ACT Government agencies.

Landscape and biodiversity Ecological Assessments

Reporting PhaseIndicators2011–122012–132013–14
DDNumber of ecological assessments conducted for LDA projects264230
DDNumber of tree assessments conducted for LDA projects333721
DDNumber of contamination studies undertaken (and remediation conducted as required) for LDA projects264136
DDNumber of geotechnical assessments conducted for LDA projectsNo historical data – indicator introduced in 2012–133922
DDNumber of bushfire risk assessments conducted for LDA projects477
PLArea of public open space included in LDA projects74ha of 242ha total site area149ha of 339ha total site area104ha of 269ha total site area
PLAmount of land set aside or created for the protection of threatened species, populations and ecological communities83ha112ha

Nil

(NB: No projects in this Phase had threatened species, populations or ecological communities identified)

CWPercentage of LDA projects that have measures in place to protect or manage identified areas of ecological importanceNo historical data – indicator introduced in 2012–13100%100%
CWPercentage of LDA projects that have tree protection measures in place100%100%100%
CWPercentage of LDA projects that have weed and pest control measures in place100%100%100%

Ecological assessments are performed during the Due Diligence Phase and are an important part of land development investigations. Ecological assessments help to identify threatened or endangered species, populations or ecological communities on a site, and include any referrals processes relating to the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999.

Tree Assessments

The LDA conducts an extensive amount of work around the management, assessment and data collection of trees within its developments. Tree assessments capture the following information:

  • regulated or registered trees;
  • location;
  • species;
  • height;
  • canopy spread;
  • trunk circumference;
  • number of trunks;
  • recommendation to retain and manage or to remove;
  • arboricultural assessment; and
  • urban amenity assessment.

Contamination Studies

Contamination studies and remedial requirements are established during the Due Diligence Phase. Contamination is prevalent in both greenfield and infill locations with remediation actions required for a wide variety of sources (sheep dips, stockpiles from unknown sources, illegal dumping, former buildings and structures).

At Kingston Foreshore the asbestos roof of the former transport depot building was replaced. These works were closely monitored for compliance, and the Old Bus Depot Markets were temporarily relocated from this part of the building during these works.

In Campbell 5, extensive remediation works were required to remove asbestos that was illegally dumped at the site some time ago prior to LDA involvement. This has required the safe removal of a large quantity of contaminated soil from the site.

The LDA has also facilitated a number of assessments to check for and remove any Unexploded Ordnance, particularly in Molonglo 3, Molonglo and Denman Prospect. This is necessary to make sure the Molonglo Valley is made safe for future land development and recreational uses.

Geotechnical Assessments

Geotechnical assessments are conducted to assess whether areas are suitable for future construction and development.

Bushfire Risk Assessments

Developments adjoining potentially fire prone areas require bushfire risk assessments to be conducted.

Public Open Space

The area of public open space refers to all areas that are zoned as Parks and Recreation and Non-Urban in the Territory Plan.

For developments in the Planning Phase, the LDA has contributed around 39 per cent of the total land area to open space in 2013–14.

Protection of Threatened Species, Population and Ecological Communities

The LDA is responsible for reserving and managing areas of land in order to protect threatened species, populations or ecological communities. These sites can include land reserved onsite (within the development) or off-site (including offset areas). Once construction commences the LDA implements measures to protect threatened species, populations or ecological communities located onsite.

Tree Protection

Tree Management Plans are required for LDA projects where trees are identified for retention and management through tree assessments, undertaken during the Due Diligence Phase. Tree Management Plans describe how trees within a development will be protected and managed through the Civil Works Phase when earthworks and construction take place.

Over 1,800 trees were planted (including street trees and trees in landscaped areas) and over 700 trees retained within LDA developments during 2013–14. This is approximately five times more trees planted or retained than were removed in the process of land development.

Weed and Pest Control Methods

Weed and pest control methods are specific to each site.

Through the Mingle Program, the LDA has partnered with Greening Australia and the Territory and Municipal Services Directorate for a tree planting day at Barrer Hill near the Molonglo River. Residents of Wright and purchasers in Coombs helped Greening Australia to revegetate the area with native species. The LDA and Greening Australia have also developed the Molonglo Valley Local Native Plant Guide to educate residents about suitable endemic native plant species for their gardens. This has now been made available online.

Waste and materials

Reporting PhaseIndicators2011–122012–132013–14
CWPercentage of LDA projects that minimised cut and fill through design and landscaping100%100%100%
CWLDA projects that have used recycled or reused materials in civil works and landscaping444

Cut and Fill Minimisation

By balancing the amount of cut and fill required on site, LDA projects reduce earthworks and associated impacts on the site.

Wright and Coombs have limited the amount of cut and fill to a maximum of 1.5 metres as part of the requirement for UDIA EnviroDevelopment accreditation.

Recycled or Reduced Materials

Where possible, LDA projects have recycled or reused materials in construction.

At Southquay Greenway, the asphalt and base gravel from the roads and shared paths that were removed has been reused for erosion control and site compound stabilisation. Natural rock material from the onsite excavations has also been reused in the construction of retaining walls.

At Campbell 5, some of the trees removed from the site are to be used for an informal play area.

Influencing design

Reporting PhaseIndicators2011–122012–132013–14
PLNumber of LDA projects that use the Design Review Panel at the Planning Phase834
PONumber of LDA projects that conducted a form of evaluationNo historical data – indicator introduced in 2013–14No historical data – indicator introduced in 2013–143

Design Review Panel (DRP)

The LDA DRP consists of respected academics, planners, architects and landscape architects who meet to review LDA and EDD projects. Projects are presented to the Panel for comments and advice regarding design outcomes. Four projects within the Planning Phase were presented to the DRP in 2013–14.

Thirteen other projects were also presented to the DRP in 2013–14. This includes LDA projects in other reporting Phases such as West Belconnen. It also includes a number of projects from other agencies including EDD and the Environment and Sustainable Development Directorate.

In the 2013–14 LDA SOI, a non-financial KPI required key LDA projects to be presented to the DRP prior to the Board’s consideration of the Project Business Plan. This target was achieved for 2013–14 as Parkes Section 3 was presented to the DRP in July 2013.

West Belconnen is a registered pilot project for the Green Star-Communities rating tool developed by the Green Building Council of Australia. As part of the process for achieving a Green Star-Communities rating, West Belconnen was presented to the DRP for review a number of times. Feedback from the design review process needs to be incorporated into the future design of the project.

Evaluation

Evaluating projects once they reach the Post Occupancy Phase is one way the LDA can assess whether the projects met their original objectives, ecological requirements and sustainability goals. Although no projects in the Post Occupancy Phase had separate evaluation processes commissioned, three projects were assessed internally against their original Business Plan objectives. This indicator has been introduced for 2013–14 to allow the LDA to collect data about this for the future.

Community Community Engagement

Reporting PhaseIndicators2011–122012–132013–14
DDNumber of projects that conducted community engagementNo historical data – indicator introduced in 2012–133015
DDNumber of heritage assessments conducted for LDA projects264011
DDNumber of noise assessments conducted for LDA projects243
PLPercentage of LDA projects that conducted community engagement100%100%100%
CWPercentage of LDA projects that have measures in place to protect or manage identified areas of heritage importanceNo historical data – indicator introduced in 2012–13100%100%
POResidential LDA estates using community programs344

Community engagement has been conducted on all LDA projects reported in the Due Diligence Phase and the Planning Phase where applicable. Community engagement was not required for some projects as it had already occurred in previous financial years, been undertaken by other agencies or is scheduled to take place in the upcoming financial year.

As part of the community engagement process, the LDA (in conjunction with EDD) conducts consultation sessions with stakeholders, community groups, adjacent land lessees, and the broader ACT community. Community engagement is used not only to inform but to consult, involve and collaborate with the community.

At Kingston Foreshore there have been meetings with key stakeholders, developers and residents about development of the area, with Pedal Power regarding cycle routes, commercial boat operators and the Lake User Group about the location and installation of a slipway, and with the Capital Lakes Rowing Club about the proposed future development of a Rowing Shed at Grevillea Park.

Community engagement took place in 2010 and 2011 for the Canberra Brickworks + Environs Draft Strategy. The current Canberra Brickworks + Environs Planning and Development Strategy was launched in May 2014. The LDA facilitated eight weeks of initial project update and overview briefings and community comment period including guided tours of the site. The LDA is currently preparing to respond to issues raised during consultation, which is to be followed by a second phase of community engagement.

Community engagement for West Belconnen has been ongoing since the ACT Government agreed to the project in mid-2013. A Planning and Design Forum was held for stakeholders to contribute to master planning in November 2013. A newsletter, website and social media have been established for the project, and a shopfront at the Kippax Group Centre has been open since February 2014 for the community to visit and discuss the proposed development.

For further information on community engagement see B.3.

Heritage Assessments and Protection

Heritage assessments were conducted on many LDA projects in 2013-14. Where areas of heritage importance were identified, protection measures were in place in all LDA developments in the Civil Works Phase. This includes heritage areas which have community value but are not formally listed on the Heritage Register.

The Canberra Brickworks + Environs project has included a number of important heritage considerations. In November 2013 the heritage registration of the Canberra Brickworks Railway Remnants was finalised and in early 2014 the Planning and Development Strategy was released for consultation with the community. The strategy facilitates making the historic Canberra Brickworks safe and the development of new high quality public open spaces. The ‘make safe’ works in the future will make the heritage value of this area accessible to all Canberrans.

Noise Assessment

Noise assessments are conducted where required to assess the potential impacts of proposed developments on existing surrounds.

Community Programs

The LDA has engaged with the community through the Mingle Community Development Program. Mingle is well established in Bonner and Franklin and it is estimated that hundreds of residents from these estates participated in Mingle events during 2013–14. Some of the events held included a photography competition, trivia night and an Emergency Services Day. Residents were also invited to attend the Gungahlin Christmas Carols.

Mingle for Molonglo commenced in October 2013, and the LDA has partnered with Communities@Work to deliver the Community Development initiative. A number of events have already been held including Brunch in the Park and Skills and Drills training with the Brumbies. A tree planting day was also held in conjunction with Greening Australia at Barrer Hill next to the Molonglo River to help revegetate the area.

The third annual Canberra International Music Festival was held on 10 May 2014 in Kingston Foreshore. The festival is an opportunity to engage with and develop the local Kingston Foreshore community and inform the broader Canberra community about the Kingston Foreshore development.

Websites, social media and newsletters were also used in many estates for ongoing engagement with the community.

Transport

Reporting PhaseIndicators2011–122012–132013–14
DDNumber of traffic and parking assessments conducted for LDA projects243225
PLPercentage of projects in which all dwellings are located within required proximity to public transport100%100%100%
PLPercentage of projects that comply with or exceeds standards for pedestrian and cycle networks and facilities100%100%100%
PLArea of roadsNo historical data – indicator introduced in 2013–14No historical data – indicator introduced in 2013–1428ha of 269ha total site area

Traffic and Parking Assessments

Traffic and parking assessments review the existing road networks and traffic conditions around a site, and assess the required onsite parking demand and traffic impact of new developments.

Public Transport Proximity

All projects within the Planning Phase met the requirements for proximity to public transport according to the Territory Plan.

Pedestrian and Cycle Networks and Facilities

All projects within the Planning Phase complied with the standards for pedestrian and cycle networks and facilities.

Affordability

Reporting PhaseIndicators2011–122012–132013–14
PLPercentage of projects that comply with affordability requirementsNo historical data – indicator introduced in 2012–13100%

67%

(NB: Affordability requirements will be met in later stages of relevant projects once the stages proceed to the Planning Phase)

PONumber of blocks settled under Land Rent837730289

Affordable Housing

Housing affordability is a key issue in the ACT. The 2013–14 LDA SOI includes non-financial KPIs to ensure both englobo and LDA greenfield developments have 20 per cent of dwelling sites released for the purpose of providing affordable housing. 67 per cent of LDA projects in the Planning Phase complied with these affordability requirements, however all affordability requirements will be met once later stages of relevant projects proceed to the Planning Phase. Most projects in the Post Occupancy Phase have delivered affordable dwellings in previous years. For 2013–14 in Wright the LDA has required Multi Unit sites to include affordable dwellings.

Land Rent

In accordance with the ACT Government’s Affordable Housing Action Plan, the LDA provides the option for purchasers of land in LDA residential estates to participate in the Land Rent scheme, which commenced on 1 July 2008.

In 2013–14, 403 blocks were settled under Land Rent across all LDA projects, including projects not yet in the Post Occupancy Phase.

Resource Consumption

The move to centralised sustainability data

In June 2014, the Government established an Enterprise Sustainability Platform (ESP), to provide a consistent approach to reporting sustainability data in future years. The ESP provides continuously updated, accurate and auditable water, energy (electricity and gas), and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions data and utility billing cost information for its assets and agencies. This function has not previously been available. The ESP was used to provide data for 2012-13 and 2013-14 in this Annual Report. This has resulted in data that is different to that published in the 2012-13 report, as more comprehensive reporting is now available.

GreenPower purchased for 2013-14

ACT Property Group purchased 7,530 MWh (Mega Watt hours) of GreenPower on behalf of the ACT Government, representing 5 per cent of the ACT Government’s energy consumption for 2013-14.  No additional GreenPower was purchased by the LDA separate to the Whole of Government bulk purchase.

Sustainable development performance 2012-2013 and 2013-2014

The following table provides information on the LDA’s energy, water, transport fuel and waste consumption and the associated greenhouse gas emissions. Consumption is reported for the LDA’s office accommodation and external usage within LDA developments.

Indicator as at 30 JuneUnit2012-132013-14Percentage change
Agency staff and area
Agency staffFTE89.299.611.7
Office space (net lettable area)Square Metres (m2)1,9271,786-7.3
Stationary energy usage
Electricity useKilowatt hours271,108285,9165.5
Renewable electricity useKilowatt hours1,2710-100
Natural gas useMegajoules000.0
Transport fuel usage
Total number of vehiclesVehicles54-20.0
Total kilometres travelledKilometres81,72983,8932.6
Fuel use – PetrolKilolitres2.842.943.5
Fuel use – DieselKilolitres5.776.248.1
Fuel use – Liquid Petroleum Gas (LPG)Kilolitres000
Fuel use – Compressed Natural Gas (CNG)Kilolitres000.0
Water usage
Water useKilolitres6,0643,147-48.1
Resource efficiency and waste
Reams of paper purchasedReams1,8291,628-11.0
Recycled content of paper purchasedPercentage63.249.12-22.3
Waste to landfillLitressee notessee notes 
Co-mingled material recycledLitres47,14246,402-1.6
Paper and Cardboard recycled (incl. secure paper)Litres104,26793,544-10.3
Organic material recycledLitres2,6732,465-7.8
Greenhouse gas emissions
Emissions from stationary energy useTonnes CO2-e286.26303.085.9
Emissions from transportTonnes CO2-e24.0324.873.5
Total emissionsTonnes CO2-e310.29327.955.7

Supporting notes to table

General

Full-time equivalent (FTE) figures include all LDA staff members.

All LDA staff members occupy the office space located at TransACT House, Dickson on the ground floor, level 6 and level 7. The TransACT House office accommodation is shared with staff from the Economic Development Directorate (EDD). The net lettable area (NLA) of office space has been apportioned based on the number of FTE staff within EDD and LDA at TransACT House.

Stationary Energy

Stationary Energy is the combined energy consumption of the LDA’s internal business operations and LDA managed estates and properties throughout the ACT.

Internal business operations includes the office tenant light and power generated at TransACT House ground floor, level 6 and level 7.

It should be noted that the electricity use provided by the energy provider for ground floor of TransACT House is assumed to be the consumption of the total ground floor electricity use and not just LDA’s proportion of the space. Without better data, this consumption has been included for 2012-13 and 2013-14 and is currently being investigated by ACT Government Property Group.

Internal business operations does not include the LDA’s proportion of central services consumption (from heating, cooling or water systems) of TransACT House consumption data.

Other energy consumption is generated at LDA managed estates and properties throughout the ACT. These estates change over time as land is developed and sold. This consumption includes irrigation pumps, sewer valves, gross pollutant traps, offsite storage sheds.

Transport

The LDA vehicle fleet is managed by SG Fleet (whole-of-government provider), who provide accurate data on the kilometres travelled and fuel consumption of all LDA vehicles.

While there is an EDD car available to LDA staff, only LDA managed vehicles were included in the transport analysis of TransACT House. While EDD staff are also able to use LDA cars, the percentage of EDD staff use for 2013-14 was not available and hence total use of LDA cars was attributed to the LDA.

Water

Water consumption in TransACT House is managed through the building owner and hence not included in 2012-13 and 2013-14. Therefore all water reported is from LDA managed estates and properties throughout the ACT. These sites change over time as land is developed and sold. Water uses include irrigation water, public buildings and bubblers.

Resource Efficiency and Waste

Paper for LDA and EDD staff is purchased together for TransACT House. Paper consumption has been apportioned based on the FTE numbers of EDD and LDA staff. Similarly, waste is collected for both LDA and EDD staff at TransACT House and has been apportioned based on the FTE numbers of EDD and LDA staff.

Waste is reported based on the number of bins collected for a particular waste/recycling stream. Unless all bins are full, the reported figures may not be the actual amount of waste produced but are the best estimate available at this point in time. Bins were calculated at 240 litres per bin.

General waste from the LDA offices is not separately sorted from other waste generated by other tenants in TransACT House and is therefore not available for inclusion in this report.

Further information may be obtained from:

Director, Office of the Chief Executive Phone: (02) 6205 2697

C.1. Internal Accountability

LDA Board

Important people in suites posing behind a desk. Names left to right below.

Bottom from left: Susan Proctor, David Dawes, Jim Shonk. Top from left: Rob Tonkin, Sandra Lambert, Ross Barrett (Chair).

The LDA Board is established by section 42 of the Planning and Development Act 2007 as a governing board. The Board must have at least five but not more than eight members. In appointing Board members, the Minister must try to ensure that the following disciplines and areas of expertise are represented:

  • land development;
  • landscape architecture;
  • sustainable development;
  • economics;
  • public law;
  • finance or accounting;
  • public administration; and
  • engineering.

Under section 56 of the Financial Management Act 1996 (FMA) the LDA Board is responsible, under the responsible Minister, for the efficient and effective financial management of the authority. Section 77 of the FMA provides that a governing board has the following functions:

  1. setting the authority’s policies and strategies;
  2. governing the authority consistently with the authority’s establishing Act and other relevant legislation;
  3. ensuring, as far as practicable, that the authority operates in a proper, effective and efficient way; and
  4. ensuring, as far as practicable, that the authority complies with applicable governmental policies (if any).

From July 2013 to June 2014 the LDA Board consisted of six members. There were a total of 11 meetings during that period.

Board attendance 2013-14

NamePositionMeetings attended of total of 11
Ross BarrettChair10*
Robert TonkinDeputy Chair10*
Susan ProctorMember11
Sandra LambertMember6**
Jim ShonkMember9*
David DawesCEO and Member11

* Apologies accepted

** Ms Lambert took an approved leave of absence for the period December 2013 to August 2014.

Ross Barrett (Chair)

Ross Barrett is a civil engineer with a Bachelor of Engineering degree from the University of NSW and a Local Government Engineers Certificate (NSW). Mr Barrett has been a Fellow of the Institution of Engineers Australia since 1986 and in 2011 and again in 2012 was recognised by Engineers Australia as one of Australia’s top 100 most influential engineers.

Mr Barrett has a long history of membership and leadership of professional bodies. He is a former President of the Master Builders ACT branch and is a Life Member of the Association. He is also a Life Member of Master Builders Australia and was a National Board member for 11 years.

Mr Barrett was a National Board member of the Civil Contractors Federation for 18 years and is a former National President of the Federation. He has been a Fellow of the Australian Institute of Company Directors since 1990.

Mr Barrett has served on a number of regional advisory and professional organisations. He was Chair of Community Housing Canberra Ltd (2007-11) and Chair of Regional Development Australia ACT in 2009-10. Both of these positions are ACT Government appointments. He was a member of the Residential Advisory Committee to the ACT from 1998 until his appointment to the LDA.

Mr Barrett’s other previous positions include:

  • Board Member, MBA Group Training (ACT) Inc.
  • Chair (2007-08) and Deputy Chair (2008-09), Capital Region Development Board.
  • Patron, ACT Region, Wordskills 2007-08.
  • Deputy Chair, Australian Technical College Queanbeyan and Region Steering Committee, 2006-08.
  • Member of Executive, Queanbeyan Business Council, 2005-08.
  • Member, Canberra Central Task Force, 2005-07.
  • Board Member, Business Canberra, 2003-05.
  • Board Member, Australian Construction Industry Form Ltd, 2003-05.

Robert Tonkin (Deputy Chair)

Robert Tonkin is a former senior Commonwealth and ACT public servant and has been a resident of Canberra since 1973. Mr Tonkin is a former Chief Executive of the ACT Chief Minister’s Department, Associate Secretary in the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet, and Deputy Secretary in the Department of Defence.

Mr Tonkin has extensive high-level experience in public sector governance, strategic policy and resource management, and in national security and risk management.

Within the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet, Mr Tonkin led the Australian Government’s Taskforce on Offshore Maritime Security, and headed the Secretariat of the COAG National Enquiry on Bushfire Mitigation and Management. In the ACT he led the Service’s response to the 2003 bushfires and served on the Bushfire Recovery Taskforce.

As a Deputy Secretary in the Department of Defence Mr Tonkin was concurrently Chief Finance Officer and Chief Information Officer, oversighted a number of divisions including resource management, corporate planning, government relations, estate management, corporate support and audit and led the Department’s successful implementation of major reform and efficiency initiatives.

Mr Tonkin has chaired a number of Commonwealth department audit committees and has been a board member of the Defence Housing Authority.

He has previously been a member of the Council of the Order of Australia and of the Australian Bravery Decorations Council, was Deputy Chair of the Defence Reserves Support Council of the ACT, and National Secretary and ACT Chair of the Australian Industry and Defence Network.

Currently, Mr Tonkin is the Independent Chair of the Audit and Risk Committee of the Attorney-General’s Department.

Mr Tonkin has an Honours degree in urban geography and is a Fellow of the Australian Institute of Management and a Member of the Institute of Company Directors.

Susan Proctor (Member)

Susan Proctor is a Legal Director of Commercial/Property at Bradley Allen Love, (the amalgamated firm of Bradley Allen Lawyers (of which she was the Managing Partner) and Williams Love & Nicol Lawyers, both local Canberra law firms). She has been practising in all aspects of property law and commercial law for the past 15 years. Her client base consists largely of Canberra based businesses, property owners/developers, clubs and listed companies involved in commercial property development.

Ms Proctor is a former director and Chair of the Audit Committee of ACTTAB. She was also a Councillor of the ACT Property Council and member of the Council’s Planning Committee. Ms Proctor was also a Director of Tuggeranong Valley Financial Services (Bendigo Bank).

Ms Proctor has a Bachelor of Laws Degree from the Australian National University, a Bachelor of Arts Degree and a Graduate Diploma in Legal Practice. Ms Proctor is a member of the Law Society and is a graduate of the Australian Institute of Company Directors.

Sandra Lambert (Member)

Sandra Lambert has worked for the public sector for all of her career spanning over 30 years. She has worked as a teacher and held a number of school based leadership positions including as a College Principal. She has also worked for the Australian Government and has held several senior executive and leadership positions in the ACT Government. Her most recent was as the inaugural Chief Executive of the then Department of Disability, Housing and Community Services (DHCS) (2002-10), a position in which she exercised the statutory role of the Commissioner for Housing, responsible for the Public Trading Enterprise known as Housing ACT.

During this period, in 2009, she also undertook the role of ACT Coordinator-General of the Stimulus Taskforce responsible for delivering the Australian Government’s National Building Package in the ACT. As Chief Executive, Ms Lambert was also actively engaged in national committees including as Chair of the Community, Disability Services Ministers’ Advisory Committee for three years. She was also a Board member of the Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute and of the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare. Before becoming a Chief Executive of DHCS Ms Lambert’s roles included driving and implementing whole of government policy development, implementation and evaluation and being responsible for leading significant, often high profile projects. Leading the project team that established Canberra Connect is one example.

Ms Lambert has a Bachelor of Arts degree from Canterbury University (NZ) and a Diploma of Teaching, Distinction Award. She is a Fellow of the Australian Institute of Management and a member of the Australian Institute of Company Directors.

Ms Lambert’s current activities include consulting roles. She is also a member of the Hands Across Canberra Board, which is a philanthropic organisation in the ACT.

Jim Shonk (Member)

Jim Shonk is well known and highly regarded in the ACT for his achievements and expertise in property valuation, commercial real estate and board operations.

He was the founding Director of the Vikings Club in Tuggeranong, past President of Clubs ACT, and is also the Director of Argus Property Investments, which he co-founded in 2012.

Mr Shonk was the Director of Commercial Sales at Colliers International’s Canberra office and as Managing Director (1992 to 2002), became the most successful sales agent in Colliers International’s global history, and consistently finished in the top four commercial agents in Australia.

Mr Shonk has also been President of the Vikings Club in Tuggeranong between 1991 and 1996, then in 1998, and again from 2001 to 2003. He was a founding Director of the Club between 1978 and 1980. During his years with the Club, Mr Shonk initiated and oversaw a review of all aspects of company performance and standards, resulting in best practice audit procedures and vastly improved governance and administration, and the expansion of the Club in Lanyon and Tuggeranong Town Centre.

He is a Fellow of the Australian Property Institute and a licensed Real Estate Agent and licensed Valuer in the ACT and NSW.

David Dawes (Chief Executive Officer and Member)

David Dawes commenced his roles as Chief Executive Officer of the Land Development Agency and Director-General of the Economic Development Directorate in May 2011. Prior to that, he was Chief Executive of the ACT Government’s Department of Land and Property Services (created in December 2009) responsible for implementing major government initiatives, such as the land release program and aspects of the nationally recognised Affordable Housing Action Plan.

During this time, Mr Dawes also oversaw the ACT Property Group, responsible for managing and preparing long-term plans for office accommodation for ACT public servants. In addition, he led the Strategic Project Facilitation group, which facilitated numerous private sector and government projects including development of the National Arboretum Canberra.

Mr Dawes joined the ACT Public Service in April 2007 as Deputy Chief Executive, Business and Projects, Chief Minister’s Department.

Prior to joining the ACT Public Service he was the Executive Director of the Master Builders Association of the ACT for nine years. In that role he represented the Association with industry, government and business groups including the Canberra Business Council, Local Area Planning and Advisory Committees and was a member of the Occupational Health and Safety Council.

During his time at the Association, he was a founding member of OzHelp – an organisation which has now been launched nationally to prevent youth suicide. He commenced the ‘Housing for Life’ advisory service in the ACT and built the first ‘Housing for Life’ display house in conjunction with ACT Housing.

In 2003 he instigated a single demolition package to assist the victims of the 2003 Canberra bushfires and was the Chairman on the Planning and Infrastructure Task Force and the Community Expert Reference Group established following the fires.

As Chief Executive Officer of the LDA, Mr Dawes’ primary responsibility is to facilitate the development and release of Government-owned land for residential, community, commercial and industrial uses.

As Director-General of EDD Mr Dawes is responsible for:

  • programs, initiatives and policy advice aimed at supporting economic and business development in the Territory;
  • preparation and delivery of the ACT Government’s land release program, including the delivery of a diverse range of capital projects;
  • managing the ACT Government’s tourism marketing and development programs, along with managing the Territory’s major sporting and recreation venues and events; and
  • leading the Government’s sport and recreation programs and policies.

In the role of Coordinator-General, Mr Dawes is responsible for coordinating government response to high value/high complexity investment/development inquiries and proposals identified by the Minister or from the private sector.

Remuneration for Chief Executive Officer and the LDA Board Members

Under the Remuneration Tribunal Act 1995 the Remuneration Tribunal determines remuneration for the CEO and Board Members.

Senior Executives Management Committees

NamePosition
David Dawes

Chief Executive Officer, Land Development Agency

Director-General, Economic Development Directorate

Dan Stewart

Deputy Chief Executive Officer, Land Development Agency

Deputy Director-General, Land Development and Corporate (EDD)

Chris ReynoldsExecutive Director, Land Development

Senior Executive Committee

The Senior Executive Committee is EDD’s principal decision making body and considers key matters affecting or relevant to, the LDA and the Directorate, including those related to:

  • Finance/Budget;
  • Workforce (including HR) and Governance (including audit and compliance);
  • Information and Communications technology;
  • Government and Directorate priorities; and
  • Emerging issues.
NamePosition
David Dawes

Chief Executive Officer, Land Development Agency;

Director-General, Economic Development Directorate

Dan Stewart

Deputy Chief Executive Officer, Land Development Agency

Deputy Director-General, Land Development and Corporate (EDD)

Gary RakeDeputy Director-General, Business, Tourism, Events and Sport (EDD)

Land Executive Committee*

The Land Executive Committee manages ongoing operational issues, oversees project delivery, LDA Risk Register review and addresses organisational management issues.

NamePosition
David Dawes

Chief Executive Officer, Land Development Agency

Director-General, Economic Development Directorate

Dan Stewart

Deputy Chief Executive Officer, Land Development Agency

Deputy Director-General, Land Development and Corporate (EDD)

Chris ReynoldsExecutive Director, Land Development
Glenn LaceyDirector, Infrastructure and Capital Works (EDD)
Dermot WalshChief Finance Officer, Strategic Finance
Paul LewisDirector, Urban Renewal
Clint PetersSales, Marketing and Land Management Director

* This meeting is also attended by Senior Project Managers.

Land Development and Corporate WHS Committee

LDA staff are represented on the Land Development and Corporate (WHS) Committee. The Committee facilitates consultation and communication between employees, represented unions and management regarding work health and safety matters.  The Committee monitors the implementation of the actions outlined in the work health and safety strategic plan which aims to achieve improved outcomes in health and safety.

At the commencement of the reporting period, the Directorate had in place three divisional Work Health and Safety Committees:  Economic Development, Policy and Governance Division; Tourism Events and Sport Division; and the Land Development, Strategy and Finance Division (also comprising LDA staff from the same workgroup).  As of 1 April 2014, the Directorate moved to a two divisional structure comprising two Work Health and Safety Committees:  Land Development and Corporate Division; and Business, Tourism, Events and Sport Division.  The Chief Minister and Treasury Directorate, Safety Support Team attends Committee meetings to provide advice.

The Economic Development Directorate Portfolio has twenty-one (21) Health and Safety Representatives for designated workgroups.  This includes four LDA staff. The Committee structure is outlined below:

NameWHS Committee RoleGeneral Title
Dan StewartCo-ChairDeputy Director-General, Land Development and Corporate
Chris ReynoldsCo-ChairExecutive Director, Land Development
Joanne RosewarneHuman Resources representativeSenior Manager, Human Resources
Leanne MartensSecretariatManager, Human Resources
Julie MylchreestWHS AdvisorSenior Human Resources Advisor
Daniel SantosuossoHealth and Safety RepresentativeLand Development
Mark OvertonHealth and Safety RepresentativeLand Development
Edward SentiHealth and Safety RepresentativeStrategic Finance
Lynette MarshHealth and Safety RepresentativeInfrastructure and Capital Works (EDD)
Simon TennentHealth and Safety RepresentativeLand Release/Sustainable Land Strategy (EDD)
Stephen TerraciniHealth and Safety RepresentativeSales, Marketing and Land Management
Adam NugentAdmin/FacilitiesEstate Management Officer
Steve PolsenAdmin/FacilitiesEstate Management Officer
Chief Minister and Treasury Directorate (CMTD)CMTD Safety Support Team advisorCMTD Safety Support team
Union RepresentativeUnion RepresentativeCPSU, APESMA are invited to attend

Joint Venture Management Committees

The joint ventures in Crace, Forde and Woden Green are each managed by a Joint Venture Management Committee. Separate project control groups manage the operational aspects of each respective site.

Crace

Crace in Gunghalin is a joint venture between the LDA and Crace Developments Pty Ltd. Crace Developments is a consortium with CIC as project manager and lead partner. The other consortium partners are Defence Housing Australia, CHC Affordable Housing and investment company, Tatebrook Pty Ltd.

Forde

Forde in Gungahlin is a joint venture development between the LDA and Forde Development Pty Ltd. Forde Development is a consortium between CIC and Lend Lease.

Woden Green

The Woden Green Joint Venture was concluded on 31 December 2012 with the Balance Holding Lease sold to Woden East Pty Ltd. The final sale transactions were completed in November 2013.

Details of the financial statements for 2013-14 for all joint ventures are provided in F.2 of this report.

Further information may be obtained from:

Director, Office of the Chief Executive Phone: (02) 6205 2697

 

C.2. Risk Management and Internal Audit

Risk Management

Risk management in the LDA is monitored and regularly reviewed by the LDA Board, its Board Audit and Risk Committee and the Land Executive Committee with recommendations provided by these bodies and the Auditor-General’s Office as appropriate. The LDA Executive is committed to, and places a high priority on, effective risk management across the full range of organisational functions. The overarching approach to managing risk at strategic and operational levels includes incorporation of appropriate fraud prevention and control processes and practices, to ensure the early identification and treatment of emerging risks.

All planning processes within the LDA, including strategic and business planning, and organisational project management, incorporate risk management.

The LDA’s approach to risk management is built on the Australian and New Zealand Standard, AS/NZS ISO 31000:2009 - Risk Management - Principles and Guidelines. The LDA’s Risk Register was developed in accordance with the Standard to include organisational risks, sources, impacts, responsibilities, treatments and monitoring/review processes. The LDA contributed to workshops held in late 2012-13 to assist Executives and management to identify significant strategic and operational risks and determine appropriate management strategies. The results have been incorporated into a new, compliant LDA Risk Register for approval by the LDA Board in early 2014-15. The identified risks will continue to be reviewed regularly by the Land Executive and the Board Audit and Risk Committee to ensure risk management strategies are included in business plans and regularly reported against.

A significant strategic and operational risk for the LDA is that of WHS. An important measure in monitoring and managing WHS risks has been the implementation of strategies to meet obligations under the Work Health and Safety Act 2011 (the WHS Act) and the Public Sector Management Act 1994, through this, the LDA continues its commitment to leadership in work health and safety. The Work Health and Safety Strategic Plan, which was developed in consultation with the LDA Board, EDD Senior Executive Committee and staff, outlines the LDA’s commitment to the provision of a safe and healthy work environment for all workers, visitors and clients. It assists the LDA in meeting WHS Act obligations where there are requirements for employers to provide and maintain a safe workplace.

Monitoring of WHS issues at all stages of construction projects is being undertaken by a dedicated WHS manager and any issues/incidents are reviewed monthly by the LDA Board to ensure strategies are in place to address identified emerging safety risks or trends.

LDA Board Audit and Risk Committee

The LDA Board Audit and Risk Committee and internal auditors provide independent assurance and assistance to the Board on LDA risk management, financial controls and legal compliance as well as external accountability responsibilities.

The LDA Board Audit and Risk Committee Charter 2013-14 provides the framework for the conduct of the internal audit function in the LDA. Annual and forward audit programs are guided by governance, risk and compliance programs and supported by an audit recommendations register.

Two internal (compliance) audits were finalised during the year, on compliance with provisions of the Freedom of Information Act 1989 andCompliance as a Statutory Authority.

The Board Audit and Risk Committee met six times during 2013-14.

Name of MemberPositionDurationMeetings attended (of the total of 6)
Robert TonkinChair2013-146
Sandra LambertMember2013-143*
Dan StewartMember2013-144**
Dermot WalshObserver2013-146
Anita HargreavesObserver (EDD)2013-142
David O’TooleObserver (ACT Audit Office)2013-143
Laura MarcantonioObserver2013-146
Joanne RosewarneObserver (EDD)2013-143
Chris WilsonObserver (EDD)2013-141
Pamela RonconSecretariat2013-143

* Ms Lambert was granted a leave of absence from December 2013 to August 2014.

** Mr Stewart was appointed to the Committee in November 2013.

Senior Executive Responsible for Business Integrity Risk

The Director Workforce and Governance, Economic Development Directorate, undertook the role of the LDA’s Senior Executive Responsible for Business Integrity Risk (SERBIR) in 2013-14.

Further information may be obtained from:

Director, Office of the Chief Executive Phone: (02) 6205 2697

C.3. Fraud Prevention

Fraud Prevention

The LDA does not tolerate fraudulent behaviour or corruption in any form or to any degree and is fully committed to its detection and elimination. The LDA Fraud and Corruption Control Plan 2012–14, prepared as required under the ACTPS Integrity Policy, provides the basis of the LDA’s actions to control fraud. The Plan identifies the key activities that require the implementation of additional controls to reduce the likelihood of fraud occurring, and assists staff in the management of fraud risks. Additionally, the Chief Executive Financial Instruction No 9 Managing Risk and Accountability, details the primary responsibilities and accountabilities in relation to fraud, integrity and related reporting.

The LDA has a strong culture of probity and adherence to public sector management values. The Land Executive Committee discusses LDA fraud risks at each meeting and members demonstrate, promote, and foster high standards of professionalism, integrity and work ethics in all staff. The Fraud Risk Register is updated as relevant by Executives and business units, and endorsed by the LDA Board Audit and Risk Committee and the LDA Board. The LDA Fraud and Corruption Control Plan and Fraud Risk Register are to be reviewed early in 2014-15.

In accordance with the governance arrangements in place under the Memorandum of Understanding between the EDD and the LDA, fraud and ethics training opportunities are available to staff through the training and development program. This includes general awareness training for staff as a component of EDD’s induction program. Topics covered in the induction program also include the ACTPS Code of Conduct, values and signature behaviours. Additionally, ethical behaviour is delivered as a component of the Respect, Equity and Diversity training that all staff are required to complete.

The policy dealing with the Purchase of Land from LDA Joint Venture and LDA Estates and associated Fast Facts is available via the EDD intranet. This policy outlines expectations for staff and members of their immediate family taking part in purchases of land from the LDA, to ensure there is no actual or perceived conflict of interest in the process.

Senior Executive Responsible for Business Integrity Risk

During 2013-14 the Director, Workforce and Governance, EDD, was the LDA’s SERBIR and managed information pertaining to actual, alleged or suspected cases of fraud. The LDA Board and LDA Board Audit and Risk Committee receive regular reports from the SERBIR.

During 2013-14 there were no incidents of suspected fraudulent behaviour.

Further information may be obtained from:

Director, Office of the Chief Executive Phone: (02) 6205 2697

C.4. Legislative Assembly Inquiries and Reports

The LDA formally responded within the EDD to the Select Committee on Estimates 2013-2014 inquiry into the Appropriation Bill 2013-2014 and Appropriation (Office of the Legislative Assembly) Bill 2013-2014. The Committee’s report was tabled on 6 August 2013 and the government response was tabled on 13 August 2013.

LDA Executive attended the following Committee hearings:

  • Planning, Environment and Territory and Municipal Services Committee Inquiry into Annual and Financial Reports 2011-12; and
  • Select Committee on Estimates 2013-14 Inquiry into the Appropriation Bill 2013-14 and Appropriation (Office of Legislative Assembly) Bill 2013-14.

Further information may be obtained from:

Director, Office of the Chief Executive Phone: (02) 6205 2697

C.5. Auditor-General and Ombudsman Reports

The LDA Board and senior management ensure the accountability of program delivery through a strong governance approach. This approach is maintained through regular monitoring and scrutiny of key activities by the LDA Board, the LDA Board Audit and Risk Committee and the LDA Executive.

Internal policies and procedures are regularly reviewed to ensure they are current and reflect the business structure and objectives of the LDA.

The LDA has not had any inquiries and reports by the ACT Auditor-General or the ACT Ombudsman.

The internal audit function is reported separately in section C.2 (risk management and internal audit).

Further information may be obtained from:

Director, Office of the Chief Executive Phone: (02) 6205 2697

D.1. Public Interest Disclosure

PUBLIC INTEREST DISCLOSURE (PID) PROCEDURES

Under the Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) between the LDA and EDD, EDD provides governance services to the LDA. The services provided include developing and implementing policy in relation to public interest disclosures (PIDs). The Director, Workforce and Governance (EDD), is the SERBIR and Disclosure Officer for the LDA.

During 2013-14, in line with the MoU, the LDA operated under EDD’s draft Public Interest Disclosure Procedures addressing the requirements of the Public Interest Disclosure Act 2012 (PID Act). The Directorate’s draft procedures are based on the Commissioner for Public Administration Public Interest Disclosure Guidelines 2013 (notifiable instrument number NI2013-40) and provide additional support for disclosers (if they wish), reflecting the recommendations from the Whistling While They Work report.

The Public Sector Management Group within the Chief Minister and Treasury Directorate (CMTD) has reviewed the Directorate’s draft procedures and advised that the additional support for disclosers provided in the procedures was innovative and could be used as a model for other directorates.

The Commissioner’s Guidelines have been under review during the second half of the financial year, which has delayed the finalisation of the Directorate’s Public Interest Disclosure Procedures.

PID STATISTICS

The LDA did not receive any PIDs during 2013-14.

Towards the end of the reporting year, CMTD implemented the Public Interest Disclosure Tracking System, to assist with future annual reporting on disclosures, as well as assist Disclosure Officers to meet the obligations and timeframes stipulated in the PID Act.

Further information may be obtained from:

Director, Office of the Chief Executive Phone: (02) 6205 2697

D.2. Freedom of Information

The ACT Freedom of Information Act 1989 (FOI Act):

  • provides for general access to documents of agencies and official documents of ministers, subject to certain exemptions;
  • provides for the amendment of records about personal affairs of an applicant that the applicant believes to be incorrect, incomplete, out of date or misleading;
  • establishes a system to review certain decisions at various levels; and
  • requires the publication of information on the functions and official documents of an agency, and that particular documents be available for inspection and sale.

The 2013-14 Internal Audit Plan included an audit of the administration of the FOI Act within the LDA, and was subsequently broadened to include EDD. The objective was to provide assurance to the LDA Board Audit and Risk Committee and the EDD Audit Committee that their statutory obligations under the FOI Act were being met. The audit awarded the highest internal control effectives rating of ‘Adequate’, finding that the Freedom of Information (FOI) function was operating effectively, that all statutory timeframes were being met and the public and stakeholders were being well advised of their review rights. The audit identified opportunities for improvement in relation to information for staff, and documentation of processes.

SECTION 7 STATEMENT

Section 7 of the FOI Act requires the LDA to prepare and publish a statement outlining the organisation’s functions and powers, the categories of documents available and facilities provided for access to documents.

ORGANISATION FUNCTION AND POWERS

The LDA is a Territory authority established by section 31 of the Planning and Development Act 2007 to develop land, carry out works to enhance land, and carry out strategic or complex urban development projects. The LDA does not administer any legislation.

A MoU between the LDA and EDD outlines a provision of governance arrangements provided by EDD. This includes the function of an FOI Coordinator.

PUBLIC PARTICIPATION IN DECISION MAKING

Arrangements for public participation in decision making include public submissions to inquiries, discussion at public meetings, consultative committees for specific purposes, access to records through FOI requests, comments on draft documents, comments on Bills before the Assembly and contact with the relevant minister.

CATEGORIES OF DOCUMENTS

The LDA holds the following categories of documents:

  • those that are freely available on request or via the website and without charge;
  • those that are exempt under the FOI Act; and
  • all other kinds of documents that may be made available under the FOI Act.

Documents available on request and without change

Documents within this category include publications by LDA on various aspects of its activities. These documents are usually distributed at events, from the offices of the LDA, and are generally available on LDA’s website. Other documents include discussion papers, information pamphlets and annual reports.

Documents available under the Freedom of Information Act (FOI Act)

Documents of other kinds that may be available under the FOI Act include:

  • general records, including internal, interdepartmental and public documents such as minutes of meetings, agendas and background papers, policy statements, correspondence and administrative records;
  • personnel records;
  • records held on microfilm, computer or paper in connection with directorate functions;
  • photographs, videos and film;
  • maps, plans and brochures;
  • technical and scientific reports and discussion papers;
  • financial records;
  • details of contracts and tenders;
  • files on applicants and clients; and
  • leases and deeds of agreement.

FACILITIES FOR ACCESS

In line with the MoU between the LDA and EDD, responsibility for the coordination of FOI requests lies with EDD. Those seeking information are encouraged to first contact the FOI Coordinator before using the more formal FOI process.

The LDA’s contact for FOI is: The FOI Coordinator Chief Minister, Treasury and Economic Development Directorate GPO Box 158 Canberra ACT 2601 Telephone: (02) 6205 0238 Email: EDDFreedomofInformation@act.gov.au

The FOI Coordinator is located in the Canberra Nara Centre, corner of Constitution Avenue and London Circuit. Several bus stops are close to the Nara Centre on London Circuit. Short-term parking is located opposite the Centre and a disabled car park space is available on Nangari Street. Information regarding bus routes and timetables can be obtained from ACTION (www.action.act.gov.au/timetables and maps), or by telephone 131 710.

SECTION 8 STATEMENT

Section 8 of the FOI Act requires the principal officer to prepare and make available a statement listing all publicly accessible documents that are used by the LDA in making decisions under a legislative scheme. A copy of the Section 8 statement is available online at www.economicdevelopment.act.gov.au

FREEDOM OF INFORMATION GUIDELINES

The ‘FOI Guidelines for Applicants’ are available on the LDA website to assist prospective applicants to make an FOI request. EDD has also prepared internal ‘Guidelines for Managers and Staff’, utilised by officers of the LDA to inform decision makers and action officers about the FOI Act and their roles and responsibilities in managing responses to applications in accordance with the FOI Act.

EDD is currently finalising Freedom of Information Guidelines 2014 and revising the Guidelines for Action Officers and Managers and creating an accompanying procedures for the FOI Coordinator, decision makers and action officers.

SECTION 79 STATEMENT

Section 79 of the FOI Act requires the LDA to include in its annual report details of applications made to the LDA during the year. Access decisions in relation to FOI requests are categorised in terms of: full access granted; partial access granted; entirely exempt; access refused to all documents (technical refusal); decision still pending; transferred; and withdrawn.

During the 2013-14 financial year, the LDA received eight applications under the FOI Act for access to documents.

TIME TAKEN TO FINALISE FOI REQUESTSACCESS DECISIONSDECISIONS APPEALED

Number of FOI Requests Received30 Days or less31 to 45 Days46 to 60 Days61 to 90 Days91 Days or moreNot yet finalised as of 30 June 2014
85021001
Full AccessPartial AccessEntirely ExemptTechnical RefusalWithdrawnTransferred to another DirectorateNot yet provided
0200501
Requests for Internal ReviewDecision AffirmedPartial AccessOverturned
20220

REFERRALS TO THE ACT CIVIL AND ADMINISTRATIVE TRIBUNAL (ACAT)

Request to ACATAffirmedOverturnedNot yet finalised
0000

FEES AND CHARGES (FOR REQUESTS WITH >10 HOURS PROCESSING TIME

Fees Charged 3Total Amount Collected
$3,842.00nil

APPLICANT TYPE4

Member of the PublicSolicitorAssociation/OrganisationMLACompany
21320

1 These requests involved third party consultation, which allows for completion within 60 days.

2 This figure includes one decision where partial remission of charges was provided (request later withdrawn); the other original decision was partially overturned in relation to access to some of the documents.

3 These charges relate to two requests; one request was withdrawn following the decision to charge. The letter of charges for the other request was sent on 30 June 2014, so no money had been collected as at the end of June 2014.

4 Activities of LDA that were of interest under freedom of information include Draft Variation 306; the Land Rent Scheme; and the Canberra Brickworks.

REQUESTS TO AMEND PERSONAL RECORDS

Section 48 of the FOI Act provides for a person, under specified circumstances, to ask for personal information in documents to be amended if he or she believes they are incomplete, incorrect, out of date, or misleading — providing the person establishes one of these grounds. No requests to amend personal records were received during 2013-14.

Further information may be obtained from:

Director, Office of the Chief Executive Phone: (02) 6205 2697

D.3. Human Rights Act

The Human Rights Act 2004 (HRA) is part of the ACT Government’s commitment to build a human rights culture in the ACT and to ensure that Territory managers are working within a human rights framework. All public officials have a duty to interpret the legislation under which they operate consistently with human rights, unless the Territory law clearly authorises otherwise.

Under section 40 of the HRA the LDA is a public authority. The majority of the LDA’s functions involve commercial relationships with business entities. The LDA discharges those functions in accordance with its obligations under section 40B of the HRA, whereby it is unlawful to act in a way that is incompatible with a human right or, in making a decision, to fail to give proper consideration to a relevant human right.

In its interactions with individuals, primarily through land sales, the LDA applies clear and transparent sale processes to protect the rights of all parties. It also provides comprehensive pre-sale material to intending purchasers that fully informs them of all relevant issues.

In all its dealings with staff, members of the public and the business community, the LDA acts in a way that takes its responsibilities into account and is respectful of human rights.

The LDA continued to actively work towards creating a positive work culture with ongoing promotion of the Respect, Equity and Diversity (RED) framework. RED training continues to be compulsory for all staff. During the reporting period 15 staff from the LDA participated in RED training.

The Human Rights Commission is referred to in the EDD Induction Manual, which is supplied to all new staff, and also in various human resource policies and fast facts, available to all staff via the Intranet.

The Directorate is committed to making information available on our various websites accessible to individuals with disabilities. Training on creating accessible documents was provided to staff on an as needs basis. The EDD Online Working Group (chaired by the head of the Communications Branch) was established to implement the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) and is continuing to work to bring the Directorate’s and the LDA’s websites into compliance with the requirements of WCAG.

The LDA has no matters before courts or tribunals that relate to human rights, nor has the LDA any involvement with developing legislation.

Further information may be obtained from:

Director, Office of the Chief Executive Phone: (02) 6205 2697

D.4. Territory Records Act

The ACT Government plays an important role in ensuring records documenting ACT Government decisions and/or the heritage of the ACT are available to Canberra residents and government officials when required. Records provide evidence and proof of a particular action and provide support and transparency around the business conducted by the Territory.

Records management emphasises the value of knowledge and information as a resource. Ensuring that records are created, stored and retained in a structured manner enables information to be retrieved and accessed quickly as needed. This allows staff to fully dedicate their energies to their work tasks knowing that their information can be easily retrieved. The record life cycle extends from the time records are received or created, through processing and use, to placement in storage and retrieval systems until eventual destruction or permanent archival retention.

Records management policy and procedures

The records created by the LDA come in many formats: documents, maps, plans, drawings, negatives, slides, costumes, artworks, models, crown leases and investigation reports. Regardless of the format, these records tell a story about the work of the agency and give context to each task. The recording of this history is invaluable in painting a picture of what has occurred in Canberra over the years.

Under the MoU between the LDA and EDD, all records management services, including training, materials and the administration of the TRIM system, are provided by EDD.

A major achievement of the LDA in 2013-14 was the redevelopment of the Records Management Program (RMP), which complies with section 16 of the Territory Records Act 2002. The RMP outlines how the LDA will manage, retain and dispose of its records, in accordance with Whole-of-Government Thesaurus and Disposal schedules, and local policies, procedures and instructions. The RMP and supporting documentation is available to staff via the LDA intranet, and the RMP is available to the public via the LDA website.

Training

An ongoing in-house training program run by the EDD Governance Section is in place to train all staff in basic records management policy and procedures, including ongoing individual support as required. This financial year saw eight LDA staff undertake an in-house course in Information and Records Management, bringing the total number of staff trained to 97 since December 2011.

The LDA uses the TRIM database for the management and storage of records, primarily hard copy files. To support the records management area, a Power User Network has been established in the LDA to manage the creation and tracking of the physical files in TRIM. In addition to tracking hard copy files, TRIM is used by the Action Tracking Team to manage LDA Ministerial matters and approval processes electronically in TRIM. A separate training session and ongoing support is also provided to these staff members; this year four staff were trained in TRIM Power User and Ministerial Action Tracking.

Training sessions2012-13 attendees2013-14 attendees
Information and Records Management188
TRIM Power User and Ministerial Action Tracking54

Access to records

In accordance with the Act, the LDA has an arrangement in place to preserve records containing information that allow people to establish links with their Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander heritage. The LDA does not expect that any of its records will contain information that may allow people to establish links with their Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander heritage, however if such a record is created, received or identified, the Directorate will endorse the record with the notation “File contains records with Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander heritage information – Do Not Destroy”.

Public Access provisions of the Act allow access to records that are more than 20 years old. In 2013-14 the LDA received five separate public access requests for records and information.

Members of the public can seek access to the LDA’s records by contacting: ArchivesACT GPO Box 158, Canberra City ACT 2601 Email to: archives@act.gov.auFax Number +61 2 6207 5835

Phone Numbers: Reference Archivist (Government records) +61 2 6207 5726 Access Support Officer +61 2 6205 3510

Under section 28 of the Territory Records Act, the LDA may apply to the Director of Territory Records to make a declaration to exempt certain records or classes of records from public access under prescribed provisions of the Act. Access to a record to which a declaration applies is prohibited under the Act.

In compliance with section 30 of the Act, the LDA maintains an approved register of section 28 declarations which is incorporated into the Territory Records Office consolidated version (available for government use on their intranet site).

Disposal of records

In addition to the Whole-of-Government Thesaurus and Disposal Schedules, which are used to manage retention length and disposal of administrative records, agency specific records are managed in accordance with the below notifiable instruments.

Records Disposal Schedule NameEffectiveYear and No.
Government Coordination Records14 September 2007NI2007—280
Land Development21 April 2006NI2006—136

At present there are two disposal freezes that are relevant to the LDA. The aim of a disposal freeze on records is to minimise the risk of losing crucial evidence at, or around the time when an issue has been identified. They are:

  • The Federal Post Cornwell Superannuation Case Litigation - Processing of Additional Claims; Instruction 23 – TRO Records Advice No. 59. Records Disposal Freeze – Superannuation Records 2010-2015; and
  • Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse - Territory Records (Records Disposal Schedule - Protection of records relevant to the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse) Approval 2013 (No 1).

The LDA will continue to retain records identified under the disposal freezes until the litigation and commission come to an end and the disposal freezes are lifted.

Further information may be obtained from:

Director, Office of the Chief Executive Phone: (02) 6205 2697

D.5. Legal Services Directions

The LDA had the following measures in place to ensure awareness and compliance with the legal services directions:

  • The Chief Executive Officer regularly reports to the Board on the status of all current litigation and legal proceedings.
  • All of LDA’s legal services are provided by the ACT Government Solicitor, except where the Chief Solicitor has provided approval to outsource legal work.
  • Policies and procedures will continue to be developed and reviewed to ensure compliance with the legal services directions.

There were no breaches of the legal services directions by the LDA in 2013-14.

Further information may be obtained from:

Chief Finance Officer Phone: (02) 6205 3585

D.7. Bushfire Risk Management

The LDA complies with the requirements of the ACT Government’s Strategic Bushfire Management Plan (SBMP) for the ACT.

The Emergencies Act 2004 requires the Emergency Services Agency (ESA) to develop a SBMP. The SBMP establishes the basis and framework for efficient, effective and comprehensive management of fire and fire-related activities to protect human life, property, assets and the environment. One of the requirements of the plan is that land managers inside the Bushfire Abatement Zone produce a Bushfire Operational Plan (BOP).

The LDA prepares a Bushfire Management Plan to cover areas under its land management control and sets out individual requirements and commitments in a BOP.

The LDA’s BOP comprises a variety of methods to reduce or remove fire fuels such as dead and damaged trees, long dry grass and fallen branches, some shrub and lower branches, bark and leaves. In 2013-14 these methods included physical removal, slashing, mowing, grazing, general maintenance and creation of fire suppression trails.

All areas in which these methods are applied are monitored for regrowth and any further risks or hazards.

In 2013-14 slashing was carried out on over 124.8 hectares at Block 766 Bonner (Horse Park Homestead), Moncrieff, Jacka, Lawson South, Gungahlin Town Centre, Hume and Wright.

Grazing of livestock is used in areas not considered environmentally sensitive. In 2013-14, 285.6 hectares of land in Moncrieff and Glenloch were grazed.

In addition, the LDA undertakes individual bushfire risk assessments for estates as directed by ESA’s SBMP and using the Environment and Sustainable Development Directorate’s (formerly ACTPLA) guidelines ‘Planning for Bushfire Risk Mitigation General Code 2008’.

Bushfire mitigation strategies identified as a result of these assessments are implemented in development of the estates or are included in individual sale conditions as well as in englobo sale of land to the private sector for its development.

Further information may be obtained from:

Director, Office of the Chief Executive Phone: (02) 6205 2697

D.8. Commissioner for the Environment

The LDA has continued to provide information on progress towards implementing relevant recommendations in Commissioner for the Environment reports and has provided other information as requested by the Commissioner.

This has included contributing a response and evidence to a review of the implementation of water related recommendations for the Office of the Commissioner for Sustainability and the Environment’s 2013-14 Annual Report.

The LDA is also currently preparing to compile responses and evidence for the 2015 State of the Environment Report to address the Commissioner’s request for information.

Further information may be obtained from:

Project Director Sustainability and Innovation Phone: (02) 6207 5602

E.1. Human Resources Management

Under a MoU arrangement between the LDA and EDD, the EDD Human Resource (HR) Unit continued to provide strategic, operational and technical advice and HR support to executives, managers and staff of the LDA. The unit performs a number of HR functions for the LDA and facilitates the provision of support directly from the Shared Services Centre. The human resource priorities are guided by the EDD Strategic Plan 2013-2016. These priorities are delivered by: providing learning and development opportunities to attract, build and retain a resilient workforce, ensuring a safe and productive work environment and by offering effective performance feedback to build a collaborative workforce.

DELIVERING FOR THE FUTURE

The ACT Public Service Economic Development Portfolio Enterprise Agreement 2011-13 (the EDP Agreement) reached its expiry date on 30 June 2013. Negotiations commenced for three new agreements with the ACT Public Service Administrative and Related Classification Enterprise Agreement 2013-2017 (Administrative Agreement) taking effect from 30 May 2014.

Negotiations continue on the other two agreements, being the Technical and other Professional Staff Agreement and the Infrastructure Services Agreement, and these are expected to take effect during the 2014-15 reporting period.

Attraction and retention of key staff remains a principal objective for the LDA to ensure that operational priorities are achieved. The LDA facilitated access for staff to attend training programs to build skills, knowledge and enhance professional development. Training programs and courses were communicated regularly to staff and promoted via the intranet and the Shared Services Training Calendar.

The LDA supported staff in attending whole-of-government leadership and development programs to nurture the talent of emerging leaders and strengthen leadership in the LDA. Learning and development requirements for the LDA are identified through personal development plans as well as evolving technology and maintenance of qualifications.

STRENGTHENING ORGANISATIONAL RESILIENCE

The LDA continued to promote workplace health and safety to maintain a workplace culture that provides a healthy and safe working environment. This involved improving staff awareness and understanding of the health and safety roles and responsibilities.

During the reporting period, an important achievement was the implementation of the Health and Wellbeing program, which incorporated activities for staff to participate in, and development of policies and fact sheets to encourage a healthy active workplace.

The LDA has a number of strategies in place to ensure organisational resilience is achieved. This includes the introduction of the performance and development framework, training and development opportunities to build and enhance knowledge and skills, and a number of health and wellbeing initiatives (refer to section E.3).

To ensure workplaces throughout the LDA are respectful, courteous, fair and value individual differences, the Respect, Equity and Diversity (RED) Framework was promoted throughout the year with Induction sessions incorporating RED for all new employees and compulsory RED training for staff at all levels. The RED Contact Officer Network met quarterly to discuss topics including information sharing, problem solving/debriefing, and peer support opportunities.

The LDA also implemented and actively promoted the ACTPS Values and Signature behaviours and the ACTPS Code of Conduct, which are available to staff through information sessions, training and on the intranet.

EDD continues to run the Staff Awards program each year which rewards EDD and LDA staff for excelling in categories based around the ACTPS values of Respect, Integrity, Collaboration and Innovation.

SUSTAINING COMMUNITY CONFIDENCE

The LDA is committed to promoting a positive culture of integrity, respect and participation that is supported by various policies. It seeks to achieve a workplace that is respectful, welcomes diversity and is free of discrimination, harassment and bullying, and where staff are aware of their obligations.

Induction programs are conducted for all new staff, with training on the RED Framework compulsory for all staff to ensure they are aware of their rights and responsibilities as an employee of the LDA and the ACTPS. The RED Framework and the Code of Conduct assist to deliver the LDA’s and EDD’s commitment to a culture of integrity, respect and participation on a range of matters of community concern. These include such issues as conflict of interest, fraud, corruption, integrity, respect and inclusiveness.

The LDA’s Performance Management program continues to be an important factor in ensuring individual development and enhancing skills and capabilities required to achieve the LDA’s strategic goals. The program encourages employee performance through ongoing feedback and performance reviews that lead to growth and innovation.

The HR Unit facilitated a number of learning and development opportunities, by conducting inhouse training and providing information regarding the courses on the Shared Services training calendar as well as participating in the service-wide programs.

WORKING COLLABORATIVELY

LDA representatives actively participated and engaged in various cross-agency forums including the People and Performance Council, HR Directors, various security and emergency forums and a range of work health and safety meetings.

During the reporting period, LDA participated in the EDD Consultative Committee and Workplace Consultative Committees (WCC) which continued to meet regularly to consolidate consultation and communication between managers, staff and unions. In addition, the WHS Committees, Health and Safety Representative Network and a RED Contact Officer Network met regularly throughout the financial year.

A bi-monthly Senior Managers Forum, which involves all Senior Managers and Executives, ensures a regular update of information from the Chief Executive Officer and provides an opportunity for sharing information and networking.

The HR Unit continued to support managers and supervisors on HR issues and accountabilities by initiating informal meetings with individual managers on an ongoing basis. This level of engagement allowed managers and HR to work together to address potential issues of concern.

EDD’s and LDA’s Social Club is strongly supported by staff and management and actively promotes positive staff morale, networking opportunities and work life balance.

Further information may be obtained from:

Director, Office of the Chief Executive Phone: (02) 6205 2697

E.2. Learning and Development

The LDA continued to provide learning and development opportunities to strengthen its workforce, build organisational capability, encourage retention and enhance ongoing performance. This has been achieved by providing a range of in-house learning and development opportunities provided as part of the EDD Learning and Development Program as well as utilising the ACT Public Service training calendar, attending conferences and various specialist programs.

Learning and Development activities included, but were not limited to, the programs outlined below.

Corporate Compliance

Staff induction: The induction program is divided into two half day sessions, with the first providing current and new employees with an overview of the functions of EDD (including LDA) and an opportunity to network and learn about the EDD portfolio. The second session is specifically aimed at new employees and is designed to provide them with an understanding of expectations in the workplace, conditions of service and workplace health and safety. LDA Executive participated in the delivery of this program.

Respect, Equity and Diversity: There are three training programs presented by CIT Solutions. These include general staff training, managerial training and Contact Officer training. The training is focused on increasing awareness and understanding of the ACT Public Service Respect, Equity and Diversity Framework.

Information and Records Management: All new staff are required to attend an in-house training on Information and Records Management.

Work Health and Safety: A diverse range of WHS training is provided. This includes First Aid Officer training; OHS Construction Induction; Asbestos Awareness; WHS for Health and Safety Officers; Executive WHS refresher; Mental Health and Wellbeing; Quit Smoking; and Managing Psychological Illness in the Workplace.

Freedom of Information: Executive staff participated in FOI training and staff attended courses facilitated by Justice and Community Safety Directorate.

Risk Management: All Executive Staff were invited to attend Risk Management training delivered by ACTIA.

Job specific

Writing for Government: This program builds on existing writing skills, providing participants with the ability to write clear and concise briefs and correspondence.

Project Management: Staff were able to participate in a variety of Project Management courses including Diploma of Project Management, Microsoft Project Management and general Project Management course.

Other courses included: Communicating with Influence, CPA Congress conference; Indigenous Cultural Awareness; and Project and Policy Evaluation.

Management

Coaching Skills for Leaders and Managers: This program consisted of a two day course and a recall session. It exposed Managers to key coaching skills and methodologies to foster improved engagement and performance.

HR Masterclass: This program is designed to provide experienced managers with access to training in high level management skills, enabling them to effectively manage complex people management issues.

In-house learning and development opportunities were promoted to staff with 93 staff attending training at an estimated cost of $122,129.

Other Whole-of-Government Learning and Development Opportunities

InitiativeNo. Of Participants
ACTPS Graduate Program2
Future Leaders Program0
Executive Development Program1

Shared Services Training

Learning and Development opportunities offered through the Shared Services Training Calendar were promoted to staff with approximately 22 staff attending training with an estimated cost of $8,276.

Studies Assistance

LDA supported three staff members through the Studies Assistance Program by providing paid and unpaid leave payment or course costs during the reporting period with an investment by the LDA of $1,654.

Further information may be obtained from:

Director, Office of the Chief Executive Phone: (02) 6205 2697

E.3. Work Health and Safety

Work Health and Safety is a priority for the LDA and it is managed in accordance with the statutory provisions of the Workplace Health and Safety Act 2011 (WHS Act) and supported by the ACTPS Workers Compensation and Safety Improvement Plan. The CMTD Safety Support team provided guidance and support to the LDA in implementing the requirements under the WHS Act. The LDA continued to implement the actions identified in its Work Health and Safety Strategic Plan.

During the reporting period the LDA was not issued (under Part 10 of the WHS Act) with any improvement, prohibition or non-disturbance notices, nor did the Agency fail to comply with any enforceable undertakings under Part 11 or Part 2 (Divisions 2.2, 2.3 and 2.4) of the WHS Act.

Health and safety structures and consultation arrangements

The LDA was represented on the Land Development, Strategy and Finance Health and Safety Committee, which became the Land Development and Corporate Health and Safety Committee as of 1 April 2014. The Committee meets on a quarterly basis to provide a mechanism for consultation, coordination and communication between employees, represented unions and management. The Committee monitors the effectiveness of the safety management system, considers injury prevention initiatives and programs, and promotes the achievement of improved health and safety outcomes.

Copies of minutes of the WHS Committee meetings are uploaded to the intranet and provided to the LDA Board. The LDA Board receives monthly WHS updates. The LDA has four elected Health and Safety Representatives who are members of the broader Land Development and Corporate Health and Safety Committee. The CMTD Safety Support Team attend Committee meetings to provide safety advice.

During the reporting period, a network meeting for Health and Safety representatives across the Directorate’s Portfolio was established. LDA Health and Safety Representatives are members of the network. The aim of the network is to share information amongst health and safety representatives, assist in determining and implementing health and safety initiatives and providing health safety representatives with advice on health and safety matters affecting the Directorate Portfolio. The CMTD Safety Support Team attend and present at the network meetings.

Injury prevention and health and wellbeing

The LDA implemented a range of injury prevention and health and wellbeing initiatives and continued to promote a culture where health, safety and wellbeing are a part of everyday business. Initiatives implemented include:

  • monthly Health and Wellbeing updates for staff;
  • monthly HR newsletter that includes health and wellbeing information;
  • ‘Health and Wellbeing’ reimbursement initiative (not exceeding $100 per annum) to financially support employees to participate in health and wellbeing activities;
  • ongoing provision of workstation assessments;
  • induction sessions that includes work health and safety information;
  • engagement of rehabilitation providers for both compensable and non-compensable injuries/illnesses to support employees to an early, safe and supported return to the workplace;
  • participation in events such as Lifeline’s Stress Down Day;
  • representation on the whole of government Health and Wellbeing Network and Work Health and Safety Working group;
  • a carer’s room, located within the workplace, is provided for staff to utilise;
  • ‘Breastfeeding Friendly Workplace’ reaccreditation;
  • provision and promotion of professional and confidential counseling services available to staff and their families through the Employee Assistance Program (EAP) provided by OPTUM;
  • provision and promotion of the EAP Manager Assist Program;
  • influenza vaccinations offered onsite to staff;
  • yoga classes (paid by staff);
  • coordination of blood donation courtesy bus travel (workplace absence is without loss of pay);
  • mental health awareness promotion activities;
  • quit smoking program;
  • walking groups and walking meetings;
  • weight loss program available for staff;
  • review of WHS policies;
  • management of workplace psychological illness in the workplace program for supervisors;
  • mandatory respect, equity and diversity training;
  • continued implementation of construction white card training and asbestos awareness training;
  • First Aid Officer training;
  • HR Masterclass for experienced managers;
  • work health and safety refresher training for Executives;
  • coaching skills for leaders and managers:
  • managing Return to work – Toolbox sessions; and
  • leadership – identifying psychopaths and psychopathic behaviour in the workplace seminar.

Notifiable Incidents

The LDA did not report any ‘notifiable incidents’ to the regulator in accordance with Part 3, Section 38 of the WHS Act.

Further information may be obtained from:

Director, Office of the Chief Executive Phone: (02) 6205 2697

E.4. Workplace Relations

The ACT Public Service Economic Development Portfolio Enterprise Agreement 2011-13 (the EDP Agreement) reached its expiry date on 30 June 2013. Negotiations commenced for three new agreements with the ACT Public Service Administrative and Related Classification Enterprise Agreement 2013-2017 (Administrative Agreement) taking effect from 30 May 2014.

Negotiations are continuing on the other two agreements, being the Technical and other Professional Staff Agreement and the Infrastructure Services Agreement and these are expected to take effect during the reporting period.

The EDP Agreement provided scope for individual Special Employment Arrangements (SEA) to be agreed with staff to allow higher levels of remuneration and access to parking to be provided, where market rates exceed those payable, as part of an attraction and retention strategy.

As at 30 June 2014, there were 14 active SEAs operating within the LDA. Two new SEAs were commenced during the 2013-14 financial year and two SEA's ceased operation.

DESCRIPTIONNo. of Individual SEAsNo. of Group SEAsTotal employees covered by Group SEAsTOTAL
 ABC(A+C)
SEAs
Number of SEAs at 30 June 2014140014
Number of SEAs entered into during period2002
Number of SEAs terminated during period2002
Number of SEAs providing for privately plated vehicles as at 30 June 20140000

 

 Classification Range Remuneration as at 30 June 2014
Individual and Group SEAsSPOC - SOGA$130,847 - $184,111

Further information may be obtained from:

Director, Office of the Chief Executive Phone: (02) 6205 2697

A crowd of people sitting in a conference room with a happy birthday Baloon filling the top left corner of photo

Staff attending the LDA 10th Birthday function

E.5. Staffing Profile

As at 30 June 2014, the LDA comprises a workforce of 104 people with the majority 93 (89.42 per cent) employed on a permanent basis. There are 14 (13.5 per cent) permanent part-time employees with the majority being female. There has been an increase in this reporting period across all equity and diversity groups with 19.2 per cent of employees identifying as being an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander, from a culturally and linguistically diverse background or having a disability.

FTE AND HEADCOUNT BY GENDERNote: numbers may not add due to rounding.

 FemaleMaleTotal
Full Time Equivalent47.851.899.6
Headcount5252104
Percentage of workforce (based on headcount)50.050.0100.0

HEADCOUNT BY CLASSIFICATION AND GENDERHEADCOUNT BY EMPLOYMENT CATEGORY AND GENDER

Classification GroupsFemaleMaleTotal
Administrative Officers25833
Executive Officers044
General Service Officers and Equivalent000
Professional Officer000
Rangers000
Senior Officers274067
Technical Officers000
TOTAL5252104
Employment CategoryFemaleMaleTotal
Casual000
Permanent Full-time354479
Permanent Part-time13114
Temporary Full-time3710
Temporary Part-time101
TOTAL5252104

FTE AND HEADCOUNT BY DIVISION/BRANCH

Division/BranchFTEHeadcount
Office of the Deputy Director-General3.03
Corporate17.519
Estate Development61.264
Urban Renewal17.918
Total99.6104

HEADCOUNT BY BRANCH AND EMPLOYMENT TYPE HEADCOUNT BY AGE GROUP AND GENDER

Division/BranchPermanentTemporaryCasualTotal
Office of the Deputy Director-General2103
Corporate163019
Estate Development Branch595064
Urban Renewal162018
Total93110104
Age GroupFemaleMaleTotal
Under 25415
25-3415722
35-44192039
45-5491423
55 and over51015
Total5252104

HEADCOUNT BY LENGTH OF SERVICE, GENERATION AND GENDER

Average Length of ServicePre-Baby BoomersBaby BoomersGeneration XGeneration YTotal
 FMFMFMFMFM
0-20001542277
2-40002455198
4-60110333276
6-800426450156
8-100002342056
10-120001020003
12-140003220025
14+ years00374400711
Total0181827281755252
GenerationBirth years coveredGenerationBirth years covered
Pre-Baby Boomersprior to 1946Generation X1965 to 1979 inclusive
Baby Boomers1946 to 1964 inclusiveGeneration Yfrom 1980 and onwards

HEADCOUNT BY LENGTH OF SERVICE AND GENDER

 FemaleMaleTotal
Average years of service7.49.78.5

HEADCOUNT BY DIVERSITY GROUP NB: Employees may identify with more than one of the diversity groups.

CategoryDiversity GroupHeadcountPercentage of agency workforce
AAboriginal and Torres Strait Islander32.9
BCulturally and Linguistically Diverse1312.5
CPeople with a disability43.8

Further information may be obtained from:

Director, Office of the Chief Executive Phone: (02) 6205 2697

F.1. Financial Management Analysis

Management Discussion and Analysis Report Land Development Agency Financial Year Ended 30 June 2014

Objectives

The key objectives of the LDA are to:

  • ensure that an adequate supply of greenfield and brownfield land will be maintained to meet market demand for residential, commercial, industrial and community uses;
  • contribute to the delivery of the Government’s policies and priorities related to affordable housing, sustainability, climate change and urban intensification;
  • adopt a ‘One Government’ approach during the land development process through the cultivation and maintenance of productive relationships across the ACT Government;
  • operate efficiently in the markets in which it operates and provide agreed returns to the Territory on its investment in the Agency;
  • ensure that key commercial decisions on land in the ACT are made with due consideration to the sustainability of the Territory (that is by balancing economic, social and environmental factors); and
  • engage the community in a timely manner in the land development process and continue to improve community engagement processes for redevelopments.

Public Trading Enterprise

The LDA is classified as a Public Trading Enterprise within the ACT Government.  Consistent with the ACT Government’s policy statement on competitive neutrality (Competitive Neutrality in the ACT, October 2010), the LDA applies similar costing and pricing principles, taxation and debt guarantee requirements and appropriate regulations as a fully corporatised business, including:

  • the acquisition of unleased land for development from the Territory on a commercial basis;
  • payment of land holding costs and stamp duty equivalents;
  • application of the National Taxation Equivalents Regime; and
  • providing a commercial return to Government through the development and sale of the land.

The total return to the ACT Government from the LDA’s activities consists of:

  • land acquisitions at market value;
  • the payment of income tax equivalents;
  • the payment of dividends;
  • the payment of land holding and stamp duty equivalents; and
  • payroll tax.

Table 1 below compares the total returns to the Territory in 2013-14, with the 2013-14 Budget (Statement of Intent) and the actual returns in 2012-13. These results are based on accrual accounting.

Table 1: Comparison of Returns to the Territory
 Actual 2014 $’mBudget 2014 $’mActual 2013 $’m
Dividends paid6779109
Income tax equivalent payments293447
Payments for land acquisitions5220352
Payroll tax111
Stamp duty4126
Total Returns to the Territory153329215

Total returns to the Territory are lower than the previous year primarily due to a decrease in land sales revenue. Detailed variances between the 2013-14 result, the 2012-13 result and the 2013-14 Budget are provided below.

Risk Management

The residential, commercial and industrial markets are highly cyclical, when market conditions change the land sales revenue and profit is impacted. Consequently, this may adversely impact on the LDA’s ability to deliver forecast returns to the ACT Government if market conditions deteriorate. It could also lead to higher than forecast returns if market conditions are more favourable than forecast. Specific risks include regulatory risk, industry capacity and performance risks, market risks and stakeholder risks as detailed below.

Regulatory Risks

  • The availability of an adequate supply of appropriately zoned residential, commercial, industrial and community land, together with concept plans and timely approvals to enable development activity to take place within planned timeframes.
  • Unforseen delays in approvals and clearances from relevant Government directorates and Commonwealth agencies that would result in slippage in the achievement of planned land release programs and revenue.
  • Changes in Commonwealth or other regulatory requirements may add uncertainty or increase costs for LDA activities impacting on delivery timeframes.

Industry Capacity and Performance Risks

  • Inability of the LDA to attract, recruit and retain a sufficient number of skilled staff.
  • Delays in the planning and timely delivery by other Directorates and utilities providers of the necessary budget funded capital works infrastructure in order to support the land release program.
  • Increases in costs due to contract performance or extension of time (eg from sustained wet weather) impacting on development schedules and financial performance projects, resulting in lower or delayed forecast returns to the Government.
  • Contractors’ failure to meet the requirements of the Work Health and Safety Act 2011.
  • The adequacy or otherwise of industry capacity and skills availability to provide necessary services to deliver land servicing and broader capital works activities.

Market Risks

  • Volatility in market demand for land as a result of the economic environment.
  • Whether the Government’s Indicative Land Release Programs can be absorbed by the market.
  • Possible increases in land servicing and construction costs.

Stakeholder Risks

  • Whether the sales revenue and land release targets can be achieved.
  • Addressing diverse and/or conflicting community views on development.

Strategies for 2013-14

The key strategies for 2013-14 that the LDA employed to achieve its objectives and effectively manage risks included:

  • collaborating with government agencies towards developing an inventory of environmentally cleared, planned, release ready and serviced land to provide flexibility and alternative release options to cover any unanticipated delays on sites otherwise identified for release in the relevant period;
  • using appropriate contract types, mechanisms and active management including Work Health and Safety, of the full range of contractors and consultants providing services to the LDA;
  • providing detailed technical advice to the Economic Development Directorate (EDD) to assist it in resolving land development issues with the Commonwealth;
  • working with government agencies and the community to develop urban renewal and development strategies for the city centre, town centres, major transport corridors and group centres;
  • effectively engaging with local communities, industry associations, relevant special interest groups and the broader ACT community to ensure relevant interests are identified and considered in LDA developments and land release activities;
  • maintaining a detailed understanding of relevant regulatory requirements and monitoring approval processes and liaising with relevant agencies to manage any issues that could otherwise delay projects;
  • effectively engaging with the private sector to capture market knowledge and encourage innovation and the transfer of skills;
  • pursuing initiatives to deliver affordable housing, consistent with the Affordable Housing Action Plan;
  • consulting with the community regularly regarding the release of land in accordance with the Indicative Land Release Programs;
  • improving integration of design management and delivery of capital works with estate works;
  • encouraging viable and liveable communities by providing a variety of block and dwelling types and public spaces to suit the needs of residents and surrounding communities;
  • delivering programs for community consultation and community development to encourage involvement and support for community building and collaborating with the Community Services Directorate in this process;
  • positioning the LDA within the market as a place of preferred employment by utilising transparent succession planning frameworks and career paths, rewarding performance and investing in staff development through training; and
  • contributing to the redevelopment of the transit corridor between Gungahlin, Civic and Lake Burley Griffin, through the Capital Metro, and City to the Lake Projects.

Financial Performance

The following financial information is based on the audited 2013-14 Financial Statements and the forward estimates contained in the 2014-15 Budget Papers.

Total Income

Components of Income

As shown in Figure 1 below, the LDA derived 87.7% of its total income for the year ended 30 June 2014 from Land Sales, 7.4% from Share of Joint Venture Profit, 3.5% from Other Income and 1.4% from Interest.

Figure 1: Components of Income 2013-14

Figure 1 Description above

Components of Land Revenue

As shown in figure 2 below, 77.6% of the LDA land revenue was derived from residential land sales for the year ended 30 June 2014, 11.4% from commercial and industrial land sales, 7.6% from Community land sales and infrastructure revenue delivered by third parties, 3.1% from Englobo sales to other developers, and 0.3% from recovery of overpaid GST.

Figure 2: Components of Land Revenue 2013-14

Figure 2 Description Above

Components of Gross Profit

As shown in figure 3 below, 83.4% of the LDA gross profit was derived from residential land sales for the year ended 30 June 2014, 7.2% from commercial and industrial land sales, 6.2% from community land sales, 2.5% from Englobo sales to other developers and 0.7% from recovery of overpaid GST.

Figure 3: Components of Gross Profit 2013-14 Figure 2Description Above

Comparison to Budget

Actual income of $269.2 million was $232.8 million lower than the budget. Actual land sales revenue of $235.9 million was $248.6 million lower than budget. The lower than budgeted land revenue related to the unsuccessful negotiations to sell the Denman Prospect englobo parcel of land, delays in construction due to delayed regulatory clearances and inclement weather, negotiation of deferred settlements and decreased demand in certain parts of the residential, commercial and industrial markets.

Comparison to 2012-13 Actual

Actual income of $269.2 million was $53.2 million lower than the 2012-13 actual result. Actual land sales revenue of $235.9 million was $27.0 million lower than the revenue achieved in 2012-13 due to:

  • a decrease in sales of land in the LDA estates primarily due to the finalisation of sales in Bonner, Harrison 4, Jacka and Wright during 2012-13; partially offset by increased sales in Coombs, Amaroo, Flemington Road and the Kingston Foreshore; and
  • the reduction in the recovery of overpaid GST from the Australian Taxation Office for prior year land sales. The majority of this was claimed in the 2012-13 financial year.

partially offset by:

  • the Englobo sale of Watson Section 64;
  • an increase in sales in Commercial and Industrial land in Dickson, Greenway and the Gungahlin Town Centre;
  • an increase in Community sales due to the sale of Ngunnawal Section 23 and Watson Section 111; and
  • an increase in infrastructure delivered by third parties due to an increased number of contracts settled that required infrastructure to be delivered by third parties.

Future Trend - Income

Figure 4 below shows the actual Total Income (inclusive of net investments in Joint Ventures), Total Expenses and Operating Profit before Tax for 2012-13, 2013-14, the 2013-14 Budget and the forward estimates for the upcoming four years. The future trend in Total Revenue reflects the Government’s currently published land release program in future years (2014-15: 3,600 dwellings; 2015-16: 3,300 dwellings; 2016-17: 3,300 and 2017-18: 3,300 dwellings).

Figure 4: Future Trends Figure 4 Description Above

Total Expenditure

Components of Expenditure

Total expenses for the year ended 30 June 2014 (as shown in Figure 5 below) were predominantly for Cost of Land Sold, which was 73.0% of the total. The two components of Cost of Land Sold are land acquisitions 30.2% and development costs 42.8%. The balance of Total expenses was for Supplies and Services 9.9%, Employee Expenses 8.0% and Other Expenses 9.1%.

Figure 5: Components of Expenditure 2013-14

Figure 5 Description Above

Comparison to Budget

Actual expenses of $173.9 million were $215.7 million lower than the budget due to:

  • Costs of Land Sold were $214.4 million lower than budget primarily due to lower than budgeted land sales as detailed above. The estimated cost of inventories sold are expensed in the Statement of Comprehensive Income at the point the developed land is sold; and
  • Interest expenses were $3.7 million lower than budget mainly due to lower than estimated land holding costs.

partially offset by:

  • Grants and Purchased Services were $2.9 million higher than budget mainly due to the payment to EDD for services received under the Memorandum of Understanding between EDD and the LDA; and
  • Other Expenses were $3.3 million higher than budget mainly due to the inventory write-off of the Hume West Estate.

Comparison to 2012-13 Actual

Total expenditure was $6.5 million higher than in 2012-13 due to:

  • an increase in employee expenses of $1.2 million mainly due to the salary increases from the ACT Public Service Administrative and Related Classifications Enterprise Agreement 2013-2017 and termination payments for a number of staff.
  • an increase in Supplies and Services of $1.2 million mainly due to an increase in sales commissions;
  • an increase in Cost of Land Sold of $5.5 million mainly due to the increase in Transfer of Infrastructure Assets expenses; and
  • an increase in Other Expenses of $3.0 million mainly due to the inventory write-off of the Hume West Estate.

partially offset by:

  • a decrease in Grants and Purchased Services of $3.1 million due to the cessation of the Housing Affordability Funding; and
  • a decrease in Interest Expenses of $1.1 million due to lower than estimated land holding costs.

Future Trends- Expenses

As shown in Figure 4 above, Total Expenses are budgeted to vary in line with the Government’s land release program, which directly impacts both the level of construction activity and subsequent land sales.

Dividends

Actual dividends paid and provided for during the 2013-14 year were $66.7 million compared to the budgeted amount of $78.7 million, a decrease of $12.0 million as a consequence lower than anticipated land sales settlements.

Actual dividends paid and provided for during the 2013-14 year were $41.8 million lower than 2012-13, as a consequence of the decreased operating surplus due to a decrease in land sales.

Financial Position

Key indicators of the health of the LDA’s financial position are the ability to sustain its asset base, to pay debts as they fall due and to maintain long-term liabilities at prudent levels.

Total Assets

Components of Total Assets

In 2013-14 the LDA maintained a strong net asset position due to its significant cash, receivables and inventory holdings in comparison with its liabilities.

Total Assets as at 30 June 2014 (as shown in Figure 6 below) comprise current and non-current Inventories 53.6%, Cash and Cash Equivalents 23.2%, Receivables 21.9%, and Other Asset 1.3%.

Figure 6: Components of Total Assets 2013-14

Figure 6 Description Above

Comparison to Budget

The LDA’s total asset position as at 30 June 2014 of $400.0 million was $5.1 million lower than budget. This is largely due to decreases in:

  • Inventories ($14.3 million) mainly due to lower than budgeted development activity and expenditure; and
  • Receivables ($25.9 million) mainly due to the write-off of the Right to Receive Infrastructure after the associated works have been completed and transferred to TAMSD and ACTEW.

partially offset by an increases in Cash and Cash Equivalents ($35.7 million) primarily due to lower than budgeted payments for development and land costs.

Liquidity

Liquidity refers to the ability of the LDA to satisfy its short-term debts as they fall due. This ability is demonstrated by the LDA’s “current ratio” (set out Table 2 below), which compares the ability to fund short-term liabilities from short-term assets. The ratio shows that the LDA is in a healthy liquidity position (1.54 to 1) at 30 June 2014

Table 2: Current Assets to Current Liabilities
 Prior Year ActualCurrent Year BudgetCurrent Year BudgetForward Year BudgetForward Year BudgetForward Year BudgetForward Year Budget
 2012-132013-142013-142014-152015-162016-172016-17
 $'000$'000$'000$'000$'000$'000$'000
Total Current Assets306,585282,805308,972236,370245,063248,712258,195
Total Current Liabilities210,425217,287201,101168,274180,498190,255204,874
Current Ratio1.46 to 11.30 to 11.54 to 11.40 to 11.36 to 11.31 to 11.26 to 1

Total Liabilities

Figure 7 below illustrates the LDA’s Total Liabilities comprising Other Liabilities 26.1%, Provision for Project Completions 23.3%, Payables 22.4%, Deferred Tax Liability 14.1%, Liability to Transfer Infrastructure 11.5%, Employee Benefits 2.0%, and Income Tax Liability 0.6%.

Figure 7: Components of Total Liabilities 2013-14

Figure 7 Description Above

Other Liabilities reflect revenue received in advance for blocks exchanged, the balance of the dividend to be paid to the ACT Government and the value of developed land ready for sale but yet to be sold; The Provision for Project Completions reflects expected costs required to finish developed parcels of land; the Liability to Transfer Infrastructure reflects the value of infrastructure assets that are to be transferred to the relevant ACT Government agency when construction is completed; Payables reflect the value of land accrued for sold blocks together with accrued development costs and administration expenses; the LDA’s Income Tax Liability and deferred Income Tax Liability reflect the balance of income tax payable to the ACT Government in 2014-15 and future period.

Comparison to Budget

The LDA’s total liability position as at 30 June 2014 of $274.2 million was $4.4 million lower than budget mainly due to the decreases in:

  • other provisions ($9.4 million) mainly due to a decrease in provision for project completion and liability to transfer infrastructure reflecting a decrease in the value of infrastructure assets to be transferred to other Government entities; and
  • income tax liability ($6.8 million) due to the deferral of payment to future periods.

offset by an increase in deferred tax liability ($9.6 million) due to the deferral of income tax payment to future periods.

Comparison to 2012-13 Actual

The LDA’s total liability position as at 30 June 2014 of $274.2 million is $2.9 million lower than the 30 June 2013 liability position of $277.1 million. This was mainly due to the decreases in:

  • other provisions ($13.5 million) mainly due to a decrease in provision for project completion and liability to transfer infrastructure reflecting a decrease se in the value of infrastructure assets to be transferred to other Government entities;
  • Income Tax Payable ($17.2 million) due to the deferral of income tax payment to future periods due to the temporary differences between the calculation of account and taxation profit and lower income tax expense due to the lower operating surplus.

offset by an increase in:

  • payables ($17.7 million) mainly due to increased GST Payable to the Australian Taxation Office, and an increase in the Payable to TAMS for land sold which was the result of a high volume of land sales late in the financial year;
  • other liabilities ($3.5 million) due to an increased balance in Revenue Received in Advance for deposits for land sales and an increase in the balance of developed land ready for sale but yet to be sold; and
  • deferred tax liability ($5.4 million) which was increased income taxes payable in future period mainly due to the taxable temporary difference in inventory.

F.3. Capital Works

The LDA carries out a significant number of civil infrastructure and landscape construction programs in conducting its land development activities. Most expenditure is incurred in constructing major infrastructure items and servicing estates.

Civil Infrastructure Construction – work in progress

Project

Original estimates

$

Year of approvalOriginal estimated completionRevised completion date

Revised total project value

$

Kingston Boat Harbour4,000,0002011May 2012June 20154,000,000
Coombs Stage 3 Civil Construction14,502,1492013July 2014August 201414,812,658
Coombs Stage 1 Civil Construction20,664,1142013August 2014October 201421,060,844
Lawson South Stage 1C21,269,9292013December 2014March 201522,136,216
Campbell Section 5 and Constitution Ave12,711,8882013March 2014January 201514,325,898
Greenway Lakeside West Stages 1 and 2 Civil Construction and Streetscaping10,000,0002013August 2014September 20147,800,000
Lawson South Stage 1A & 1B8,847,9072013March 2015March 20158,847,907
Downer School Site Demolition940,0002013July 2014August 20141,000,000

Civil Infrastructure – completed

ProjectOriginal estimates $Final costs $Estimated completionPractical completionFinancially complete
Coombs Stage 222,134,50526,325,506November 2013February 2014No
Flemington Road Stage 2B1,791,5342,011,418April 2014April 2014No
Amaroo Group Centre7,310,0007,500,000June 2013April 2014No

Landscape construction – work in progress

ProjectOriginal estimates
$
Year of approvalOriginal estimated completionRevised completion dateRevised total project value
$
Kingston Public Realm Landscaping9,019,3312012December 2014April 2014*9,006,499
Kingston Public Realm Boardwalk3,474,3662012June 2012May 2013**3,933,064
Wright Stage 1B4,600,0002013March 2016April 20165,500,000
Bonner 4 Open Space1,307,3602013May 2015May 20151,874,515
Greenway Lakeside West Stages 1 and 2 Open Space Landscaping3,501,1472013March 2014March 20153,501,147
Wright Stage 23,100,0002013March 2016May 20163,628,056

Landscape construction – completed * Contactor went into liquidation. ** Contract complete. However, works not at practical completion due to dependencies on adjacent site works.

ProjectOriginal estimates $Final costs $Estimated completionPractical completionFinancially complete
Bonner 3 Open Space2,312,4812,404,957February 2014April 2014No
Wright 1A1,500,0001,841,160March 2013July 2013No

Further information may be obtained from:

Chief Finance Officer Phone: (02) 6205 3585

F.4. Asset Management

ASSETS MANAGED

As at 30 June 2014, the LDA managed assets valued at $3.651 million comprising one building at Kingston Foreshore, leasehold improvements and office equipment. This does not include leased motor vehicles or leased office equipment.

These assets are held at independent valuation (building) and cost (leasehold improvements and office equipment), net of accumulated depreciation.

It should be noted that land purchased from the Commonwealth and ACT Government and land development works in progress are treated as inventory by the LDA and valued at the lower of cost or net realisable value in accordance with Australian Accounting Standards and do not form part of the LDA’s fixed asset register.

Assets managed include:

AssetProperties
Land & BuildingsFormer Kingston Transport depot (occupied by the Old Bus Depot Markets and Megalo Arts)
Leasehold improvementsGround floor, level 6 and level 7, Transact House
Plant and EquipmentOffice Equipment

ASSET ADDITIONS AND DISPOSALS

There were no asset disposal or additions in 2013-14.

ASSET MAINTENANCE AND UPGRADE

In 2013-14 the LDA operational assets valued at $3.651 million were subject to general repairs and maintenance only. No upgrades were undertaken.

OFFICE ACCOMODATION

The LDA has provision to accommodate 117 employees and contractors occupying approximately 1,719 sqm of office accommodation on the ground floor, level 6 and level 7 of Transact House, 470 Northbourne Avenue Dickson. The average area occupied by each employee is approximately 14.7 sqm.

Further information may be obtained from:

Chief Finance Officer Phone: (02) 6205 3585

F.5. Government Contracting

The LDA uses external sources of labour and services to meet its objectives. The LDA engaged a range of consultants and contractors to provide specialist resource need in relation to specific functions. In 2013-14 this included planning and design, civil engineering, geotechnical, environmental, urban design, project management, valuation, legal and financial services and advice.

The LDA’s procurement selection and management process for all contractors, including consultants, was completed in accordance with the Government Procurement Act 2001 and Government Procurement Regulation 2007, and subordinate guidelines and circulars. The LDA has submitted all relevant contracts for review by the Government Procurement Board consistent with the provisions of the Government Procurement Regulation. The LDA has complied with quotation and tender thresholds and ensured all contractors have complied with their employee and industrial relations obligations.

CONTRACTS AND CONSULTANTS

The following table lists the contract entities used to provide professional services to the LDA where the procurement was exempt from quotation and tender threshold requirements. It includes single select tenders (or group of contracts) with a value over $25,000 and select tenders (or group of contracts) with a value over $200,000.

CONTRACTING ENTITYDESCRIPTION

MONTH CONTRACT LET

COST ($ EX-GST)REASON(S) FOR EXEMPTION
BLAK PLAN PTY LTDSite Investigation - Block 4 Section 61 DownerNov-1345,492Supplier’s specialist knowledge and timeframe
BROWN CONSULTING (ACT) PTY LTDDetail design and Documentation Services - Molonglo Demonstration PrecinctNov-13126,825Timeframe
COFFEY GEOTECHNICS PTY LTDContamination Study - Hume New WestMay-1471,510Supplier’s specialist knowledge
DELTA GROUP PTY LTDSchool Demolition - Block 4 Section 61 DownerMay-14186,487Timeframe
DFP DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTIONUrban Project Management Consultancy ServicesMay-127,740Supplier’s specialist knowledge
DIGITAL DISTRIBUTION AUSTRALIA PTY LTDRelocation of fibre optic cable Block 6 Section 64 WatsonDec-1371,481Supplier’s specialist knowledge
DRUMMOND DEVELOPMENTSProject Consultancy ServicesJun-12153,500Supplier’s specialist knowledge
ELLEVEN CONSULTING PTY LTDProject Advice, Co-ordination and Management - City to Lake ProjectJan-13316,695Supplier’s specialist knowledge
ELLEVEN CONSULTING PTY LTDFinancial and Taxation AdviceJul-12406,898Supplier’s specialist knowledge
GOLDER ASSOCIATES PTY LTDEnvironmental Site Auditor Services - Campbell Section 5Sep-1326,844Supplier’s specialist knowledge and timeframe
GOLDER ASSOCIATES PTY LTDSite Auditor - Kingston ForeshoreNov-09255,698Supplier’s specialist knowledge
GRIFFITH CONSULTINGProject ManagementJan-10101,961Supplier’s specialist knowledge
INDESCO PTY LIMITEDVerge Remediation Design and Superintendency - Gungahlin MetrosDec-1344,653Supplier’s specialist knowledge and timeframe
INFRASTRUCTURE SERVICES GROUP PTY LTDPreliminary Business Case - City to the LakeApr-14217,790Supplier’s specialist knowledge and timeframe
LINK CORPORATE SERVICES PTY LTDFinancial ServicesJul-1298,868Supplier’s specialist knowledge
MACROPLAN AUSTRALIA PTY LTDCost Benefit Analysis - Canberra BrickworksOct-1231,300Supplier’s specialist knowledge and timeframe
MILSEARCH PTY LTDUnexploded Ordinance Assessment - MajuraJan-1454,385Supplier’s specialist knowledge and timeframe
MILSEARCH PTY LTDUnexploded Ordinance Assessment - MolongloAug-1385,791Supplier’s specialist knowledge and timeframe
MILSEARCH PTY LTDUnexploded Ordinance Assessment - MolongloJan-1441,430Supplier’s specialist knowledge and timeframe
OXIGEN PTY LTDDetailed Design and Construction Superintendence - Kingston ForeshoreAug-10112,913Supplier’s specialist knowledge
PG INTERNATIONAL CONSULTINGFunctional Brief and Operational Requirements - City to the LakeApr-1442,209Supplier’s specialist knowledge and timeframe
PRICEWATERHOUSECOOPERS AVANTIS INFORMATION SYSTEMS PTY LTDSpecialist GST AdviceJul-121,593,226Supplier’s specialist knowledge
TANIA PARKES CONSULTANCYStrategic Communications - City to the LakeJan-14198,471Supplier’s specialist knowledge and timeframe

CONSTRUCTION RELATED WORKS PROJECTS

The LDA use Contractors for construction related activities. In 2014-15 this included Civil Works Construction, Landscape Construction, Electrical Infrastructure and Telecommunications Infrastructure. The LDA did not procure any construction related works which were with non-prequalified contractors in excess of the relevant pre-qualification thresholds.

Further information may be obtained from:

Chief Finance Officer Phone: (02) 6205 3585

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