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ANNUAL REPORT 2012-13

Table of Contents

The following Annual Report for the formerly known Land Development Agency, presents information on statutory compliance, financial, non-financial and operational performance.

Section A — Performance and Financial Management

  • A1. The organisation
  • A2–A4. Overview, highlights and outlook
  • A5. Management discussion and analysis
  • A6. Financial report
  • A7. Statement of performance
  • A8. Strategic indicators
  • A9. Analysis of agency performance
  • A10. Triple bottom line

Section B—Consultation and Scrutiny Reporting

  • B1. Community engagement
  • B2. Internal and external scrutiny
  • B3. Legislative Assembly Committee Inquiries and Reports
  • B4 Legislation report

Section C—Other Reporting

  • C1. Risk management and internal audit
  • C2. Fraud prevention
  • C3. Public interest disclosure
  • C4. Freedom of information
  • C5. Internal accountability
  • C6. Human resources performance
  • C7. Staffing profile
  • C8. Learning and development
  • C9. Work place health and safety
  • C10. Work place relations
  • C11. Human Rights Act 2004
  • C12. Strategic Bushfire Management Plan
  • C13. Strategic asset management
  • C.14 Capital works
  • C15. Government contracting
  • C16. Community grants/assistance/sponsorship
  • C17. Territory records
  • C18. Commissioner for the Environment
  • C19. Ecologically sustainable development
  • C20. Climate change and greenhouse gas reduction policies and programs
  • C21. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander reporting
  • C22. ACT Multicultural Strategy 2010–13
  • C23. ACT Strategic Plan for Positive Ageing 2010–14
  • C24. ACT Women’s Plan 2010–15
  • C25. Model litigant guidelines
  • C26. Notice of non-compliance
  • C27. Property crime

A1. The organisation

The Suburban Land Agency is the ACT Government agency responsible for the development and release of Territory owned land for residential, commercial, industrial,community and non-urban purposes.

In this role it operates at the boundary of commercial and public sector activities. It seeks to balance potentially competing priorities, and provide opportunities for private sectordevelopment to optimise the community benefits from the ACT’s land assets.

In the discharge of its responsibilities, the LDA is:

  • the key deliverer of the ACT Government’s land release outcomes;
  • a major supplier of raw land for development and individual serviced sites for building activities for private sector developers, builders, households, community groups and businesses; and
  • a tool for the delivery of the ACT community’s aspirations for high quality, sustainable living environments.

Legislation

The LDA is a Territory authority established by div 31 of the Planning and Development Act 2007 (PDA). While the LDA does not administer any enactments, it is bound by chapter 4 of the PDA. The PDA provides for planning (ACT Planning and Land Authority (ACTPLA) as custodian of the Territory Plan: chapter 5, PDA) and development (the LDA as land developer in compliance with the Territory Plan) in implementing a land system that contributes to the orderly and sustainable development of the ACT.

The LDA Governing Board was established by div 42 of the PDA and Board members are appointed under that div. The role of the Board is to govern the LDA in accordance with the Financial Management Act 1996 (FMA) and the PDA. The Board has appointed a Board Audit Committee which meets at least quarterly.

The LDA must also comply with any directions given to it by the Minister under div 37 of the PDA and is staffed under the Public Sector Management Act 1994 (PSMA).

The Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of the LDA holds all the powers of a CEO of a Territory instrumentality under the PSMA. The CEO is a statutory office holder appointed under the FMA and is a member of the LDA Board. The role of the CEO is combined with the role of the Director-General (DG), Economic Development Directorate (EDD), to manage the LDA in accordance with governance arrangements determined by the LDA Board.

Mission

The LDA will contribute positively to the economic and social development of the ACT by building vibrant and sustainable communities through greenfield and urban renewal projects for the development of residential, commercial, industrial, community and nonurban land.

Vision

The LDA strives to be an organisation of excellence that:

  • recognises it is a key instrument for the delivery of ACT Government policies;
  • acts commercially;
  • promotes and rewards innovation;
  • is adaptable;
  • behaves ethically and professionally in all that it does; and
  • appropriately values its people and its customers.

Values statement

The LDA is committed to the core values of professionalism, honesty, integrity, innovation and cooperation, and pursues these values in all its business dealings.

Objectives

The key objectives of the LDA are to:

  • ensure an adequate supply of land to meet market demand and establish an inventory of serviced land;
  • contribute to the delivery of the ACT Government’s key policies and priorities relating to affordable housing, sustainability and climate change;
  • improve inter-directorate coordination to facilitate efficient land delivery processes across the residential, commercial, industrial and community sectors;
  • operate efficiently in a commercial market and provide agreed returns to the Territory on its investment in the Agency;
  • ensure that key commercial decisions on land in the ACT are made with due consideration to the sustainability of the Territory that is (by balancing economic, social and environmental factors);
  • improve community engagement processes for high profile redevelopments; and
  • support the efficiency and effectiveness of the EDD portfolio though effective working relationships and contribution to policy development.

LDA structure (as at 30 June 2013)

LDA structure (as at 30 June 2013)

Land Development, Strategy and Finance Division

The LDA Board is supported by the CEO, who in turn is served by the Land Development, Strategy and Finance Division. For broader efficiency, this division also includes some EDD functions.

Land Development Sub-Division

The Land Development Sub-Division has the following branch responsibilities.

Business Operations and Strategy Branch

The responsibilities of the Business Operations and Strategy Branch are to:

  • provide procedural and quality assurance support and advice to all areas of the Land Development Sub-Division;
  • undertake coordination functions including facilitating and preparing responses to ministerial correspondence and coordinating the preparation of the LDA Statement of Intent (SOI);
  • coordinate the preparation of the LDA Annual Report;
  • provide secretariat and administrative functions for the LDA Board and Audit Committee;
  • manage the LDA internal audit function;
  • maintain the LDA Risk Register;
  • provide administrative support functions as required by the Division;
  • manage legal and compliance matters for the Division; and
  • develop and maintain work health and safety systems to meet obligations under the Work Health and Safety Act 2011.

Estate Development Branch

The responsibilities of the Estate Development Branch are to:

  • develop Government-owned land for release for residential, commercial, industrial, community and non-urban purposes as indicated in the ACT Government’s Indicative Land Release Programs (ILRP);
  • obtain the relevant approvals (for example, environmental, development, detail design);
  • provide due diligence to inform the ILRP and resolve strategic environmental and planning issues for projects that are to be released in the ILRP out years;
  • procure and project manage the civil and landscape construction works; and
  • work with EDD Infrastructure and Capital Works to maximise the efficient and timely delivery of LDA estate works with interfacing capital works.

Urban Renewal Branch

The responsibilities of the Urban Renewal Branch are to:

  • undertake site assessments and approvals on site preparation in established areas;
  • manage the Civil Engineering Services Panel;
  • support the Government’s direct sales by undertaking investigations and minor civil LAND DEVELOPMENT AGENCY works;
  • undertake the LDA’s Minor Works Program;
  • be at the forefront of sustainable design through the review of projects by the LDA Design Review Panel (DRP);
  • assess sites for potential future release and development, including Master Plan delivery in line with the ACT Government’s ILRP; and
  • support the delivery of environmentally and socially sustainable land developments and construction through the LDA estates projects.

Sales, Marketing and Estate Management Branch

The Sales, Marketing and Estate Management Branch:

  • manages the marketing and sales of residential, commercial, industrial and community land;
  • undertakes estate management services, including land custodian and licence arrangements; and
  • is responsible for LDA corporate branding.

Land Strategy and Finance Sub-Division

Strategic Finance Branch

The LDA’s Strategic Finance Branch is accountable for delivery of value-added tactical and strategic financial services, support, analysis and advice to key stakeholders, including:

  • the Minister for Economic Development;
  • the LDA Board;
  • the Chief Executive Officer of the LDA;
  • ACT Treasury; and
  • business units within the LDA and the broader EDD.

LDA developments

In 2012-13 the LDA committed resources and effort in the following developments.

Residential

Gungahlin

  • Crace (Joint Venture)
  • Forde (Joint Venture)
  • Flemington Road
  • Jacka
  • Moncrieff
  • Kenny
  • Throsby
  • Amaroo
  • Harrison
  • Franklin
  • Bonner
  • Parkes
  • Ngunnawal

Belconnen

  • Lawson
  • Belconnen Town Centre
  • Macquarie

Central Canberra

  • Campbell
  • Kingston Foreshore
  • Dickson
  • Watson
  • Canberra Brickworks
  • Downer

Molonglo

  • Wright
  • Coombs
  • Denman Prospect

Woden Valley

  • Woden East (Joint Venture)
  • Woden Town Centre

Tuggeranong

  • Greenway
  • Oxley
  • Yarralumla
  • Belconnen
  • Acton
  • Conder
  • Gungahlin
  • Griffith
  • Red Hill
  • Monash
  • Weston
  • Holder
  • Nicholls
  • Amaroo
  • Aranda
  • Barton
  • Bruce
  • Chapman
  • Forrest
  • Franklin
  • Garran
  • Higgins
  • Kambah
  • Majura
  • Narrabundah
  • Tuggeranong

Commercial

  • Banks
  • Belconnen Town Centre
  • Campbell
  • City
  • Dickson
  • Franklin
  • Gungahlin Town Centre
  • Greenway
  • Kingston
  • Macquarie
  • Woden Town Centre
  • Holt
  • Ngunnawal
  • Harrison
  • Barton
  • Crace (Joint Venture)
  • Parkes
  • Charnwood
  • Gordon
  • Hackett
  • Latham
  • Lyneham
  • Majura
  • Stirling
  • Stromlo
  • Theodore
  • Watson
  • Weston

Industrial

  • New West Industry Park (Hume)

Community

  • Lyneham
  • Macarthur
  • Ngunnawal

LDA developments 2012-13

LDA developments 2012-13

 

Further information may be obtained from:

Chief Executive Officer

Telephone: (02) 6207 3331

Chief Finance Officer

Telephone: (02) 6205 3585

Senior Business Manager

Telephone: (02) 6207 8263

A2–A4. Overview, highlights and outlook

Report by the Chair

On behalf of the LDA Board, management and staff, I am pleased to present the Suburban Land Agency’s 2012-13 Annual Report.

The LDA faced a number of challenges over the last year, most particularly from a softening in some market sectors, above average population growth and a series of environmental and regulatory issues that have challenged our land release program in recent years. Despite these challenges, the LDA had a successful year in most areas of activity.

Residential land releases totalled sites for 4,354 dwellings, short of the target of 5,000 in the Statement of Intent (SOI). The main areas of release were in the district of Molonglo, including Denman Prospect and Coombs, the Woden East joint venture and, to a lesser extent, Gungahlin, including Franklin and the Crace joint venture. (The Crace joint venture houses the very successful Community Recreational Irrigated Park — fondly known as the Crace CRIP — a first for Canberra.)

Environmental clearance processes again proved to be the toughest challenge for the LDA, with a number of scheduled residential land releases delayed into 2013-14 and beyond.

Notwithstanding, the LDA has released, on average, almost 4,000 residential dwelling sites per annum over the last three years and we are proud of our progress in delivering on the Government’s housing affordability objectives during this period.

Commercial land releases comprised a total area of 120,479 m2, exceeding the published target of 100,036 m2. The main area of release activity in the commercial sector was Gungahlin, which accounted for 50 per cent of total commercial releases.

Strong supplies of industrial land on the market saw the release of 24,249 m2 in the Hume industrial estate, short of the target of 102,110 m2. As a result, the Government maintains an inventory of over 280,000 m2 of industrial land for sale.

Construction and land development activity has again contributed strongly to the ACT economy over the year. The release of 4,354 residential lots combined with ongoing building works on both LDA and joint venture sites has offset weakness in other parts of the Territory’s economy and ensured that ACT growth remained above most other jurisdictions throughout 2012-13.

While overall releases were higher than in 2011-12, revenue from land sales was down due to a high number of contract rescissions and a significant number of delayed settlements. In 2012-13, the LDA achieved $262.8 million in land sales revenue, which was $167.7 million lower than 2011-12.

Despite these results, the LDA remains a reliable contributor to the Territory’s finances with a final dividend of $108.5 million.

The high quality work of the LDA and our development partners continues to be recognised by our industry peers. In 2012-13, the Amaroo Group Centre project was nominated for a Design and Innovation Award at the Urban Development Institute of Australia (UDIA) Awards for Excellence, and the LDA again achieved industry recognition for sustainability and innovation in Wright and Coombs, the first suburbs in the Molonglo Valley. Wright and Coombs achieved recertification in the categories of energy, waste, community and ecosystems under the EnviroDevelopment program developed by the UDIA, which recognises the most sustainable developments in Australia.

The LDA has also invested significant time and effort in preparing to pilot the Green Star — Communities tool in Lawson that has been developed by the Green Building Council of Australia (GBCA). This is a national scheme to assess the sustainability of community level projects and the LDA, with other government land organisations, has been a sponsor supporting development of the tool.

The LDA strengthened its relationship with local industry by partnering with the Master Builders Association of the ACT to deliver the Franklin Charity House project. This highly successful project involved the generous support and contributions from many local businesses.

The Franklin Charity House sold at auction on 3 March 2013 for $850,000. The proceeds of the sale totalled $582,000, and were distributed among five charities that work with some of the most vulnerable people in our community, including those who are homeless or are at risk of becoming homeless. This was an exemplar project demonstrating how the public and private sector can work together for the good of the Canberra community. I wish to acknowledge the former Chair, Mr Ray Young, and former Board Member, Mr Bill Wood, following their retirement from the LDA Board at the end of last year. The Board and staff are grateful for the significant contributions made by Mr Young and Mr Wood during their time with the LDA.

I particularly thank my fellow Board Members, namely Deputy Chair Rob Tonkin, Sandra Lambert and Susan Proctor for their enthusiasm and support throughout the year. I also wish to acknowledge the late Ray Davis and his invaluable contribution to the LDA Board and the broader Canberra and regional community.

‘...He was a true gentleman, a man of good humour, great style and “sartorial flair”. He will be greatly missed.’ (LDA Board of the late Ray Davis, February 2013) Finally, on behalf of the Board I would like to thank the LDA management and staff for their remarkable efforts in what was a challenging but rewarding year.

Ross Barrett OAM

LDA Board Chair

Report by the Chief Executive Officer

In a challenging operational and strategic environment, the LDA has maintained its dedication to setting new standards in innovation, excellence and value in urban design and sustainable development throughout the last 12 months.

Despite delays in environmental clearances, there is much to be proud of.

In recognition of the important role that land development plays in generating economic activity and supporting the ACT budget, the LDA, together with the broader Economic Development Directorate, is taking on a larger than ever range of planning and infrastructure development responsibilities. This is highlighted by the:

  • volume of contracts under management;
  • steady increase in the LDA’s estate and precinct planning and associated community consultation activities; and
  • geographic distribution of the LDA’s activities across Canberra.

Throughout 2012-13, we continued to deliver land required to support the economic development of Canberra and, importantly, to provide more sustainable and more affordable housing for the Territory’s growing population.

Work health and safety

Work health and safety is a high priority for the LDA and is an important part of our culture. The LDA affirmed its leadership in work health and safety during the year through the development and implementation of the Interim Guidelines for Managing Work Health and Safety in the Construction Industry, which have subsequently been adopted across the broader ACT Government.

The guidelines provide the primary work health and safety reference point for LDA project directors and managers involved in construction projects, and guide what the LDA does with respect to work health and safety at all stages of a construction project.

The guidelines were developed under the advice of ACT Work Safety Commissioner, Mr Mark McCabe, and the guidance of the Getting Home Safely Report commissioned by the ACT Attorney General in September 2012. Development of the guidelines was undertaken through consultation across the ACT Government and they are now being incorporated into the LDA’s procurement and contract management guidelines.

The LDA’s aim in implementing the guidelines and associated processes goes beyond meeting our obligations under work health and safety legislation — our goal is to achieve best practice work health and safety outcomes on all sites that we commission.

Residential land releases

Land release for residential development remains a key focus for the LDA. In 2012-13, residential land releases totalled sites for 4,354 dwellings, compared with the target of 5,000. The total number released includes sites for single residential or detached dwellings and multi-unit developments in LDA estates, LDA joint ventures, englobo releases for private sector subdivision and a range of direct sales in significant infill locations across Canberra.

A number of scheduled releases did not occur due to a combination of delays or deferrals in provision of infrastructure, Commonwealth environmental clearances and regulatory processes. These factors caused delays to the following key sites:

  • 1,100 dwelling sites in Lawson;
  • 684 dwelling sites in Belconnen; and
  • 200 dwelling sites in Watson.

To counter these delays, a number of alternative residential sites programmed for release in future years were accelerated into 2012-13. The major additional releases came from a large englobo release at Denman Prospect, the inclusion of sites from the Woden East joint venture along with some existing LDA estates and infill projects.

Capital works activity supplying the trunk infrastructure to service Wright and part of Coombs is almost complete. In June, the identification of unexploded ordnance in Molonglo Stage 2 put the project at risk of delay, with further work being undertaken to test and clear the area in the vicinity of construction of key infrastructure. Sites for 346 dwellings were released in Coombs during the year in addition to the englobo release.

Molonglo overtook Gungahlin as the major area of land release activity, with significant volumes of land being released in Wright, Coombs and the large englobo release of Denman Prospect in the Molonglo Valley. Releases continued in the Gungahlin suburbs of Jacka, Ngunnawal 2C and through the LDA joint ventures at Crace and Forde.

The joint venture estates at Crace and Woden East continued to perform strongly. The Crace project released 327 dwelling sites — just shy of the 350 initially planned. As a contrast, the Woden East project saw the release of 1,152 dwelling sites — substantially more than its programmed 300. The Forde joint venture was formally wound up towards the end of 2012-13 with no further releases.

The provision of land for aged care units and community services redevelopments fell short of expected outcomes with only 19 of the scheduled 350 sites delivered due to lower than anticipated construction tenders let during the year.

Despite some contamination issues at Kingston Foreshore, the project met its release target of 120 dwelling sites. The Boardwalk and Harbour landscaping works were completed and formally launched by the Minister for Economic Development in May 2013, with private development activity continuing into 2013-14.

Substantial work occurred in 2012-13 for the future release of residential land in Lawson, Moncrieff, Greenway, Jacka and Throsby with releases in these suburbs anticipated to commence in 2013-14 and continue to be key areas of release activity over the next few years.

The LDA has increased the amount of land that was ‘shovel ready’ at the time of release during 2012-13 by 14 per cent. Thirty-eight per cent of total released dwelling sites (or 1,667 sites) were ready to be built on at the time of release.

Housing affordability initiatives

As at 30 June 2013, a total of 1,505 blocks were involved in the Land Rent Scheme, an increase of 95 from the previous financial year. These blocks have a total value of $475 million, of which 1,263 blocks (total value of $388 million) have settled and the remaining 242 (total value of $87 million) have exchanged and are expected to settle over the next 24 months. A further 91 blocks initially taken on land rent leases have been converted to standard leases.

The announcement of changes to eligibility requirements in the ACT Government’s 2013-14 Budget is expected to result in a decrease in take-up in 2013-14.

The most recent phase of the LDA’s OwnPlace Scheme has now been completed and the current builders’ panel arrangement has expired. A total of 454 blocks had been made available to builders on the OwnPlace panels in Franklin and Bonner for the construction of affordable house and land packages under the affordable housing threshold.

Building on the success of the LDA’s collaboration with the Commonwealth Government under the Housing Affordability Fund, the LDA continued to invest in affordable housing at Crace and Harrison. Of the $13.2 million allocated, the LDA has spent $12.4 million on affordable housing to date.

Commercial and industrial land releases

The LDA released 120,479 m2 of commercial land in 2012-13, exceeding the published program by more than 20,000 m2. The results of the various tender and auction processes show that confidence in the local market remains strong, with local firms generally outbidding interstate organisations for raw land and associated commercial development opportunities.

A similar sentiment is not being seen with respect to industrial land, resulting in an inventory of over 50 blocks, totalling in excess of 280,000 m2 available for sale.

Financial outcome

The LDA’s total income and profits in 2012-13 were lower than the levels achieved in the previous financial year, with total income of $322.4 million ($483.1 million in 2011-12) and profit before tax of $155 million ($203.3 million in 2011-12). These decreases were primarily due to a decrease in land sales revenue. The LDA achieved $262.8 million in land sales revenue in 2012-13, which was $167.7 million lower than 2011-12. This was due to decreased sales in LDA estates, including Bonner, Flemington Road and Harrison 4, and partially offset by increased sales in Jacka and Wright. There were no englobo sales in 2012-13 ($57.5 million in 2011-12).

The actual income achieved in 2012-13 was below the levels forecast in the 2012-13 SOI. Total income was $322.4 million, compared to $404.9 million in the 2012-13 SOI. This decrease was primarily due to a reduction in englobo land sales, commercial land sales, sales in LDA estates and direct sales. The decrease in englobo sales was due to a delay in the release of Molonglo 3 and Watson. The decrease in commercial land was primarily due to lower demand in the commercial sector. The decrease in sales of land in LDA estates was primarily due to anticipated sales in Campbell 2/5 and Kingston being delayed. The decrease in community land sales was due to several direct sales being extended or deferred to 2013-14.

The actual profits achieved in 2012-13 were above the levels forecast in the 2012-13 SOI. Profit before tax was $155 million, compared to $103.3 million in the 2012-13 SOI.

This increase was primarily due to additional land revenue from GST refunds related to prior year land sales and a higher share of operating profit from joint ventures.

As at 30 June 2013, the LDA had exchanged sales contracts totalling $152 million, the majority of which are scheduled to settle in 2013-14. This level of carry forward of exchanged contracts demonstrates the scale of the LDA’s activities and achievements during 2012-13. As a consequence, the LDA remains in a strong position to continue to make a significant contribution to the Territory’s finances in 2013-14.

Inventory levels

The LDA is working to grow its inventory of serviced residential land to provide maximum choice and flexibility for potential purchasers. As at 30 June 2013, 239 single residential blocks and one multi-unit site (totaling 85 dwellings) were held in inventory.

As noted above, an inventory of serviced industrial land has been established with over 280,000 m2 available for sale in the New West Estate at Hume.

Recognition

The high quality of the LDA’s work and that of our consultants and contractors continues to be recognised by our industry peers. The Amaroo Group Centre project was nominated for a Design and Innovation Award at the Urban Development Institute of Australia (UDIA) Awards for Excellence. The Group Centre encompasses 4.3 hectares, which features the integration of residential, commercial and community facilities in one centre. This is the first project of this type to be delivered in the ACT and could ultimately demonstrate a new benchmark for water sensitive urban design.

In 2012-13 the LDA again achieved industry recognition for sustainability and innovation in Wright and Coombs, the first suburbs in the Molonglo Valley. Wright and Coombs achieved recertification in the categories of energy, waste, community and ecosystems under the EnviroDevelopment program developed by the UDIA. This program recognises the most sustainable developments in Australia.

Community engagement

The LDA’s community engagement activities play a vital role in producing a range of high quality opportunities for residential, commercial and industrial, community and non-urban development across the ACT.

With support from its portfolio agency, the LDA continues to enhance its capacity to consult effectively with the ACT community in relation to developments in our estates and for infill locations. Developments across Belconnen, Campbell, Phillip, Greenway, Kingston Foreshore and Gungahlin have been the primary focus of the LDA’s community consultation activities during 2012-13. These and other consultations are continuing into and during 2013-14.

LDA and EDD staff are also working with industry associations, professional groups and Community Councils to ensure that comments and suggestions are considered in relation to the full range of proposed land releases in the ACT Government’s Indicative Land Release Program.

In 2012-13 the Mingle community development program continued with the LDA organising a range of events in addition to regular newsletters and online communication for the residents of Franklin and Bonner. These included the Franklin Festival, the Bonner and Franklin Christmas Lights Competition, the Bonner Photo competition, the Gungaderra Sensory Garden Community Working Bee and a series of Bonner Twilight Movie Nights.

The LDA again hosted the Canberra International Music Festival twilight event at Kingston Foreshore, with strong positive feedback from Kingston residents and the broader Canberra Community.

The Mingle program has proved its success in building vibrant communities in Gungahlin and the program will be rolled out in the Molonglo suburbs of Wright and Coombs in 2013-14. The program is tailored for each suburb to suit demographics, resident feedback and proximity to surrounding services.

I would like to finish by acknowledging the contribution of the LDA Board members, with particular recognition of the late Ray Davis. Ray was a man of deep integrity who readily shared his knowledge and experience. He played a vital role as a member of the LDA Board and his contribution and involvement had a profoundly positive impact on those who had the privilege to work with him.

I would also like to acknowledge the hard working staff within the LDA for their enthusiastic and positive contribution throughout 2012-13.

David Dawes

Chief Executive Officer

A5. Management discussion and analysis

Objectives

The key objectives of the LDA are to:

  • ensure an adequate supply of land to meet market demand and establish an inventory of serviced land;
  • contribute to the delivery of the ACT Government’s key policies and priorities relating to affordable housing, sustainability and climate change;
  • improve inter-directorate coordination to facilitate efficient land delivery processes across the residential, commercial, industrial and community sectors;
  • operate efficiently in a commercial market and provide agreed returns to the Territory on its investment in the agency;
  • ensure that key commercial decisions on land in the ACT are made with due consideration to the sustainability of the Territory (that is, by balancing economic, social and environmental factors);
  • improve community engagement processes for high profile redevelopments; and
  • support the efficiency and effectiveness of the Economic Development Directorate (EDD) portfolio through effective working relationships and contribution to policy development.

Public trading enterprise

The LDA is a public trading enterprise. Consistent with the ACT Government’s policy statement on competitive neutrality (Competitive Neutrality in the ACT, October 2010),the LDA applies similar costing and pricing principles, taxation and debt guarantee requirements and appropriate regulations as a fully corporatised business, including:

  • the acquisition of unleased land for development from the Territory on a commercial basis;
  • land holding costs payments;
  • stamp duty equivalency payments;
  • application of the National Taxation Equivalents Regime; and
  • providing a commercial return to government through the development and sale of the land.

The total return to the ACT Government from the LDA’s activities consists of:

  • land acquisition payments;
  • land holding costs;
  • stamp duty equivalency payments;
  • payroll tax; and
  • payment of dividends based on operating profit after tax.

Table 1 compares the total returns to the Territory in 2012-13 with the 2012-13 Budget (SOI) and the actual return in 2011-12. These results are calculated using the accrual basis of accounting.

Table 1: Comparison of returns to the Territory

 

Actual 2013 $m

Budget 2013 $m

Actual 2012 $m

Dividends declared

109

72

142

Income tax equivalents

47

31

61

Payments for land acquisitions

52

136

130

Payroll tax

1

1

1

Stamp duty and interest on borrowing

6

7

Total returns to the Territory

215

247

334

Total returns to the Territory are lower than the previous year primarily due to a decrease in land sales revenue. Detailed variances between the 2012-13 result, the 2011-12 result and the 2012-13 Budget are provided below.

Risk management

The residential, commercial and industrial markets are highly cyclical — when market conditions change, the land sales revenue and profit is impacted. Consequently, this may adversely impact on the LDA’s ability to deliver forecast returns to the ACT Government if market conditions deteriorate. It could also lead to higher than forecast returns if market conditions are more favourable than forecast. Specific risks include market, regulatory and industry capacity, and performance risks as detailed below.

Market risks

  • Volatility in market demand and ability of the market to absorb the ACT Government’s Indicative Land Release Programs (ILRP) with consequential impacts on revenue targets.
  • Possible increases in land servicing and building construction.

Regulatory risks

  • The availability of an adequate supply of appropriately zoned land, together with concept plans and timely approvals to allow the delivery of the ILRP within planned timeframes.
  • Timely receipt of necessary environment and related clearances to facilitate achievement of the ILRP.

Stakeholder risks

  • Delays caused by the need to address diverse and/or conflicting community views on specific developments

Industry capacity and performance risks

  • Increases in costs or time to deliver infrastructure (from sustained wet weather for example) impacting on development schedules and financial performance of projects.
  • The adequacy or otherwise of industry capacity and skills availability to provide necessary services to deliver land servicing and broader capital works activities.
  • Inability of the LDA to attract, recruit and retain a sufficient number of skilled staff.
  • Contractors’ inability to meet the requirements of the Work Health and Safety Act 2011.

Strategies for 2012-13

The key strategies that the LDA employs to achieve its objectives and effectively manage risks include:

  • collaborating with other government agencies to develop an inventory of environmentally cleared, planned, release ready and serviced land to provide flexibility and alternative release options to cover any unanticipated delays on sites otherwise identified for release in the relevant period;
  • providing detailed technical advice to the EDD to assist it in resolving land development issues with the Commonwealth;
  • using appropriate contract types, mechanisms and active management of the full range of contractors and consultants providing services to the LDA;
  • effectively engaging with local communities, industry associations, relevant special interest groups and the broader ACT community to ensure relevant interests are identified and considered in LDA developments and land release activities;
  • working with government agencies and the community to formulate urban renewal and development strategies for the city centre, town centres, major transport corridors and group centres;
  • maintaining a detailed understanding of relevant regulatory requirements and monitoring approval processes and liaising with relevant agencies to manage any issues that could otherwise delay projects;
  • building effective involvement with the private sector to capture market knowledge and encourage innovation and the transfer of skills;
  • pursuing initiatives to deliver affordable housing consistent with the Affordable Housing Action Plan;
  • consulting with the community regularly regarding the release of land in accordance with the ILRP;
  • improving integration of design management and delivery of capital works with estate works;
  • encouraging viable and liveable communities by providing a variety of block and dwelling types and public spaces to suit the needs of residents and surrounding communities;
  • delivering programs for community consultation and community development to encourage involvement and support for community building;
  • positioning the LDA within the market as a place of preferred employment by utilising transparent succession planning frameworks and career paths, rewarding performance and investing in staff development through training; and
  • progressing the redevelopment of the transit corridor between Civic and Gungahlin, through the newly established Gungahlin to City Project Office, by coordinating and developing transit, urban planning and financial and delivery options.

Financial performance

The following financial information is based on the 2012-13 Financial Statements and the forward estimates contained in the 2013-14 Budget Papers.

Total income

Components of income

As shown in figure 1, the LDA derived 81.5 per cent of its total income for the year ended30 June 2013 from land sales, 12.3 per cent from share of joint venture profit, 1.4 per cent from interest and 4.8 per cent from other income.

Figure 1: Components of Income 2012-13

Components of Income 2012-13

Components of land revenue

As shown in figure 2, 76.1 per cent of LDA land revenue was derived from sales of land inthe LDA estates for the year ended 30 June 2013, 14.3 per cent from recovery of overpaid GST, 7.2 per cent from commercial and industrial land sales, and 2.4 per cent from community land sales, additional yield and infrastructure revenue delivered by third parties.

Figure 2: Components of land revenue 2012-13

Components of land revenue 2012-13

Components of gross profit

As shown in figure 3, 67.9 per cent of LDA gross profit was derived from sales of land in the LDA estates for the year ended 30 June 2013, 26.5 per cent from recovery of overpaid GST, 3.4 per cent from commercial and industrial land sales, and 2.2 per cent from community land sales and other.

Figure 3: Components of gross profit 2012-13

Components of gross profit 2012-13

Comparison to budget

Actual income of $322.4 million was $82.5 million lower than the budget. Actual land sales revenue of $262.8 million was $119 million lower than budget, which relates to lower than expected settlements from residential, commercial and industrial lease sales.

Lower commercial land sales occurred due to lower than expected demand in the commercial sector. The lower englobo sales was due to a delay in the release of Molonglo 3 and Watson. The lower sales of land in LDA estates was primarily due to anticipated sales in Campbell and Kingston being delayed. The lower infrastructure sales delivered by third parties was due to a lower number of contracts settled that required infrastructure to be delivered by third parties.

Comparison to 2011-12 actual

Actual income of $322.4 million was $160.7 million lower than the 2011-12 actual result.Actual land sales revenue of $262.8 million was $167.7 million lower than in 2011-12 due to:

  • a decrease in sales of land in LDA estates primarily due to reduced sales in Bonner and Harrison 4, which was partially offset by increased sales in Jacka and Wright;
  • a decrease in englobo sales; and
  • a decrease in infrastructure delivered by third parties due to a decreased number of contracts settled that required infrastructure to be delivered by third parties.

This reduction was partially offset by recovery of overpaid GST from the Australian Taxation Office.

Future trend — income

Figure 4 shows the actual total income (inclusive of net investments in joint ventures), total expenses and operating profit before tax for 2011-12, 2012-13, the 2013-14 budget and forward estimates for the upcoming four years. The future trend in total revenue reflects the Government’s current published land release program (4,800 dwellings in 2013-14, 4,700 dwellings in 2014-15, 4,500 dwellings in 2015-16 and 4,000 dwellings in 2016-17).

Figure 4: Future trends

Future trends

Total expenditure

Components of expenditure

Total expenses for the year ended 30 June 2013 (as shown in figure 5) were predominantly for cost of land sold, which was 72.5 per cent of the total. The two components of cost of land sold are land acquisitions (31.1 per cent) and development costs (41.4 per cent). The balance of total expenses was for supplies and services (9.6 per cent), employee expenses (7.5 per cent) and other expenses (10.4 per cent).

Figure 5: Components of expenditure

Components of expenditure

Comparison to budget

Actual expenses of $167.4 million was $134.2 million lower than the budget. This reflected the following variances.

  • • Costs of land sold were $138.5 million lower than budget primarily due to lower than budgeted land sales as detailed above. The estimated cost of inventories sold are expensed in the statement of comprehensive income at the point the developed land is sold.
  • Interest expenses were $2.6 million lower than budget mainly due to lower than estimated land holding costs.

Partially offset by:

  • Grants and purchased services were $3.5 million higher than budget mainly due to the payment to the EDD for services received under the Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) between EDD and the LDA.
  • Other expenses were $4.1 million higher than budget mainly due to costs associated with supporting the Capital Metro Project and increased stamp duty equivalent payment.

Comparison to 2011-12 actual

Total expenditure in 2012-13 was $112.4 million lower than in 2011-12 due to:

  • a decrease in cost of land sold of $119.7 million, which is directly related to decreased land sales of $167.7 million as detailed above — the estimated cost of inventories sold are expensed in the statement of comprehensive income at the point the developed land is sold;
  • an increase in supplies and services of $2.3 million — due to an increase in consultants and contractors relating to a review of the application of GST on land sales by the LDA; and
  • an increase in interest expenses of $3.2 million — due to higher land holding costs as a result of increased levels of development activity.

Future trends — expenses

As shown in figure 4, total expenses are budgeted to vary in line with the Government’s ILRP, which directly impacts both the level of construction activity and subsequent land sales.

Dividends

Actual dividends provided for during 2012-13 were $108.5 million compared to the budgeted amount of $72.3 million, an increase of $36.2 million. This is due to the higher than expected profit arising from additional land revenue from GST refunds related to prior year land sales and a higher share of operating result from joint ventures, and was partially offset by lower than anticipated land sales settlements.

Actual dividends paid and provided for during 2012-13 were $33.8 million lower than 2011-12, as a consequence of the decreased operating surplus from lower than expected land sales.

Financial position

Key indicators of the health of the LDA’s financial position are the ability to sustain its asset base, to pay debts as they fall due and to maintain long-term liabilities at prudent levels.

Total assets

Components of total assets

In 2012-13 the LDA maintained a strong net asset position due to its significant cash, investments, receivables and inventory holdings in comparison with its liabilities.

As shown in figure 6, total assets as at 30 June 2013 comprise current and non-current inventories (40.8 per cent), receivables (30.7 per cent), cash and cash equivalents (25.3 per cent), investments in joint ventures (2.1 per cent), and property, plant and equipment (1.1 per cent).

Figure 6: Components of total assets 2012-13

Components of total assets 2012-13

Comparison to budget

The LDA’s total asset position as at 30 June 2013 of $402.9 million was $88.8 million higher than budget. The increase is largely due to the increases in:

  • receivables ($71.7 million) — due to a higher than budgeted receivable from the Commerce and Works Directorate for land rent blocks settled but not paid, GST receivable from Australian Taxation Office for overpaid GST on prior year land sales and the Woden East Joint Venture wind up; and
  • cash and cash equivalents ($81.7 million) — primarily due to lower than budgeted payments for development and land costs.

This increase was partially offset by decreases in:

  • inventories ($51.3 million) — mainly due to lower than budgeted development activity and expenditure; and
  • investments in joint ventures ($12.9 million) — due to the wind-up of the Woden East Joint Venture.

Liquidity

Liquidity refers to the ability of the LDA to satisfy its short-term debts as they fall due. This ability is demonstrated by the LDA’s ‘current ratio’ (set out in table 2), which compares the ability to fund short-term liabilities from short-term assets. The ratio shows that the LDA is in a healthy liquidity position (1.46 to 1) at 30 June 2013.

Table 2: Current assets to current liabilities

Total Current Assets

321,691

193,927

306,585

282,805

268,828

270,274

243,155

Total Current Liabilities

213,890

131,210

210,425

217,287

192,464

183,190

158,199

Current Ratio

1.50 to 1

1.48 to 1

1.46 to 1

1.30 to 1

1.40 to 1

1.48 to 1

1.54 to 1

Calculation line

1.50

1.48

1.46

1.30

1.40

1.48

1.54

Total liabilities

Figure 7 illustrates the LDA’s total liabilities comprising: other liabilities (36.7 per cent), provision for project completions (22.9 per cent), liability to transfer infrastructure (16.4 per cent), payables (15.6 per cent), income tax liability (6.8 per cent) and employee benefits (1.5 per cent).

Figure 7: Components of total liabilities

Components of total liabilities

Other liabilities reflect revenue received in advance for blocks exchanged, the LDA’s deferred income tax liability, the balance of the dividend to be paid to the ACT Government and the value of developed land ready for sale but yet to be sold. The provision for project completions reflects expected costs required to finish developed parcels of land. The liability to transfer infrastructure reflects the value of infrastructure assets that are to be transferred to the relevant ACT Government agency when construction is completed. Payables reflect the value of land accrued for sold blocks together with accrued development costs and administration expenses. Income tax liability reflects the balance of income tax payable to the ACT Government.

Comparison to budget

The LDA’s total liability position as at 30 June 2013 of $277.1 million was $89.5 million higher than budget as a result of increases in:

  • payables ($18.7 million) — due to the GST adjustment on sales for the Crace Joint Venture and an increase in accrued expenses relating to holding costs and stamp duty equivalents;
  • other provisions ($8.9 million) — due to an increase in provision for project completion and liability to transfer infrastructure reflecting an increase in the value of infrastructure assets to be transferred to other Territory entities;
  • other liabilities ($35.6 million) — due to an increased balance of dividend payable to the ACT Government at 30 June 2013 and an increase in the value of developed land ready for sale but yet to be sold; and
  • income tax liability ($11.3 million) — due to a higher than budgeted operating surplus.

Comparison to 2011-12 actual

The LDA’s total liability position as at 30 June 2013 of $277.1 million was $1.9 millionhigher than the 30 June 2012 liability position of $275.2 million. This was caused by the increases in:

  • payables ($16.2 million) — due to the GST adjustment on sales for the Crace Joint Venture and an increase in accrued expenses relating to holding costs and stamp duty equivalents;
  • other provisions ($4.1 million) — due to an increase in provision for project completion and liability to transfer infrastructure reflecting an increase in the value of infrastructure assets to be transferred to other government entities; and
  • deferred tax liability ($4.3 million).

The LDA’s total liability position was offset by a decrease in:

  • other liabilities ($22.8 million) — due to an increased balance of dividend payable to the ACT Government at 30 June 2013 and an increase in the value of developed land ready for sale but yet to be sold.

Further information may be obtained from:

Chief Finance Officer

Telephone: (02) 6205 3585

A6. Financial report

Financial reportFinancial report

Suburban Land Agency
Statement of Comprehensive Income
For the Year Ended 30 June 2013

Statement of Comprehensive Income For the Year Ended 30 June 2013

Suburban Land Agency
Statement of Financial Position
As at 30 June 2013

Statement of Financial Position As at 30 June 2013

Suburban Land Agency
Statement of Changes in Equity
For the Year Ended 30 June 2013

Statement of Changes in Equity For the Year Ended 30 June 2013

Suburban Land Agency
Statement of Changes in Equity - Continued
For the Year Ended 30 June 2013

Statement of Changes in Equity - Continued For the Year Ended 30 June 2013

Suburban Land Agency
Cash Flow Statement
For the Year Ended 30 June 2013

Cash Flow Statement For the Year Ended 30 June 2013

Suburban Land Agency
Cash Flow Statement - Continued
For the Year Ended 30 June 2013

Cash Flow Statement - Continued For the Year Ended 30 June 2013

Suburban Land Agency Note Index

Note 1Objectives of the Suburban Land Agency
Note 2Summary of Significant Accounting Policies
Note 3Change in Accounting Estimates
Note 4Significant Accounting Judgements and Estimates

Income Notes

Note 5Land Sales
Note 6User Charges - ACT Government
Note 7User Charges - Non-ACT Government
Note 8Interest
Note 9Distribution from Investments with the Territory Banking Account
Note 10Resources Received Free of Charge
Note 11Other Revenue
Note 12Gains on Investments

Expense Notes

Note 13Employee Expenses
Note 14Superannuation Expenses
Note 15Supplies and Services
Note 16Depreciation and Amortisation
Note 17Grants and Purchased Services
Note 18Cost of Land Sold
Note 19Interest Expense
Note 20Other Expenses
Note 21Waivers, Impairment Losses and Write-offs
Note 22Auditor's Remuneration
Note 23Income Tax Equivalents

Asset Notes

Note 24Cash and cash Equivalents
Note 25Receivables
Note 26Inventories
Note 27Property, Plant and Equipment
Note 28Intangible Assets
Note 29Other Assets

Liability Notes

Note 30Payables
Note 31Interest-Bearing Liabilities
Note 32Employee Benefits
Note 33Other Provisions
Note 34Income Tax Payable
Note 35Other Liabilities
Note 36Deferred Tax Liability

Equity Note

Note 37Equity

Other Notes

Note 38Financial Instruments
Note 39Commitments
Note 40Contingent Liabilities and Contingent Assets
Note 41Interest in Jointly Controlled Entities
Note 42Cash Flow Reconciliation
Note 43Events Occurring after Balance Date
Note 44Related Party Disclosures

Suburban Land Agency Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements For the Year Ended 30 June 2013

NOTE 2 SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

(a) Basis of Accounting

The Financial Management Act 1996 requires the preparation of annual financial statements for Territory authorities. The Financial Management Act 1996 and the Financial Management Guidelines issued under the Act requires the LDA's financial statements to include:

  1. (i) a Statement of Comprehensive Income for the year;
  2. (ii) a Statement of Financial Position at the end of the year;
  3. (iii) a Statement of Changes in Equity for the year;
  4. (iv) a Cash Flow Statement for the year;
  5. (v) a summary of the significant accounting policies adopted for the year; and
  6. (vi) such other statements as are necessary to fairly reflect the financial operations of the LDA during the year and its financial position at the end of the year.

These general-purpose financial statements have been prepared in accordance with 'Generally Accepted Accounting Principles' (GAAP) as required by the Financial Management Act 1996. The financial statements have been prepared in accordance with:

  1. (i) Australian Accounting Standards; and
  2. (ii) ACT Accounting and disclosure Policies.

The financial statements have been prepared using the accrual basis of accounting, which recognises the effects of transactions and events when they occur. The financial statements have also been prepared according to the historical cost convention, except for assets which were valued in accordance with the valuation policies applicable to the LDA during the reporting period.

These financial statements are presented in Australian dollars, which is the LDA's functional currency.

The LDA is an individual reporting entity.

(b) The Reporting Period

These financial statements state the financial performance, changes in equity and cash flows of the LDA for the year ended 30 June 2013 together with the financial position of the LDA as at 30 June 2013.

Suburban Land Agency Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements For the Year Ended 30 June 2013

NOTE 1 OBJECTIVES OF THE LAND DEVELOPMENT AGENCY

(a) Operations and Principal Activities

The Suburban Land Agency operates under the Planning and Development Act 2007 and was created by the ACT government to maintain stability in the supply of land, to deliver high quality urban development and to realise a better return on the Territory's land holdings.

The key objectives of the LDA are:

  • ensuring an adequate supply of land to meet market demand and to establish an inventory of serviced land;
  • contributing to the delivery of the Government’s key policies and priorities relating to affordable housing, sustainability and climate change;
  • improving inter-directorate coordination to facilitate efficient land delivery processes across the residential, commercial, industrial and community sectors;
  • operating efficiently in a commercial market and to provide agreed returns to the Territory on its investment in the agency;
  • ensuring that key commercial decisions on land in the ACT are made with due consideration to the sustainability of the Territory (that is by balancing economic, social and environmental factors);
  • improving community engagement processes for high profile redevelopments; and
  • supporting the efficiency and effectiveness of the Economic Development Directorate portfolio through effective working relationships and contribution to policy development.

The LDA applies due commercial rigour in the undertaking of its operations, with the objective of delivering a return to the Territory commensurate with relevant industry benchmarks. For the purposes of presentation of the Financial Statements, the LDA is treated as a 'for profit' entity.

(b) Public Trading Enterprise

The LDA is a Public Trading Enterprise. Consistent with the ACT Government’s policy statement on competitive neutrality (Competitive Neutrality in the ACT, October 2010), the LDA applies similar costing and pricing principles, taxation and debt guarantee requirements and appropriate regulations as a fully corporatised business, including:

  • the acquisition of unleased land for development from the Territory on a commercial basis;
  • land holding costs payments;
  • stamp duty equivalency payments;
  • application of the National Taxation Equivalents Regime; and
  • providing a commercial return to Government through the development and sale of the land.

The total return to the ACT Government from the LDA’s activities consists of:

  • land acquisition payments;
  • land holding costs;
  • stamp duty equivalency payments;
  • payroll tax; and
  • payment of dividends based on operating profit after tax.

Suburban Land Agency Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements For the Year Ended 30 June 2013

NOTE 2 SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES - CONTINUED

(c) Comparative Figures

Budget Figures

The Financial Management Act 1996 requires the financial statements to facilitate a comparison with the LDA's Statement of Intent. Budget information provided for 2012-13 is the budget information included in the LDA's 2012-13 Statement of Intent.

Prior Year Comparatives

Comparative information has been disclosed in respect of the previous period for all amounts reported in the financial statements, except where an Australian Accounting Standard does not require comparative information to be disclosed.

Where the presentation or classification of items in the financial statements is amended, the comparative amounts have been reclassified where practical. Where a reclassification has occurred, the nature, amount and reason for the reclassification is provided.

(d) Rounding

All amounts in the financial statements have been rounded to the nearest thousand dollars ($'000). Use of "-" represents amounts equal to or rounded down to zero. Tables and notes may not add due to rounding.

(e) Revenue Recognition

Land Sales

Land sales revenue is recognised when the significant risks and rewards of the sale of land are transferred to the purchaser. Whilst the point of recognition for one sale may differ from another depending on the individual terms of each contract of sale, in the majority of cases sales completed via auction, direct grant, ballot or over the counter will be recognised on settlement.

Revenue from the provision of development rights to a joint venture is recognised in accordance with the substance of the transaction. When a legally enforceable agreement to contribute undeveloped parcels of land to the joint venture entity for development exists, the LDA recognise the gains attributable to the interest:

  1. (i) of other ventures on the provision of development rights to the joint venture; and
  2. (ii) progressively as the land is sold to a third party by the joint venture.

Sales under the Land Rent Scheme are recognised on settlement, at which point the LDA raises an invoice to the Commerce and Works Directorate to facilitate a payment for compensation for foregone land revenue. The compensation paid to the LDA reflects the amount the LDA would have received if the sale had been a capital sum sale rather than a not for capital sum (rent lease) sale to the land owner.

Should sale proceeds be received by instalments over more than 12 months, the initial amount to be recorded as revenue is the fair value of the consideration calculated by discounting the contracted value (nominal value) using a prevailing rate for a similar instrument of an issuer with a similar credit rating to the LDA. The difference which arises between the fair value of the consideration to be received over the deferral period and the contracted (nominal) value of the land is recognised as interest income over the deferral period.

Suburban Land Agency Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements For the Year Ended 30 June 2013

NOTE 2 SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES - CONTINUED

(e) Revenue Recognition - Continued

Proceeds from land sales may comprise both cash related transactions and the value of infrastructure required to be provided by the purchaser as part of the Deed of Agreement associated with the sale of land. The Right to Receive Infrastructure from the purchaser is recognised as revenue and a receivable at the time of settlement.

User Charges

User charges are revenue directly related to the sale of goods or provision of services. They are generated by consumer demand and are non-regulatory in nature. User charges revenue is recognised when the goods are provided or when the fee in respect of services provided is receivable. User charge revenue is not part of government appropriation.

Interest Income

Interest income is recognised as it accrues using the effective interest method.

Distribution

Distributions from the Investments with Territory Banking Account were recognised on an accrual basis.

(f) Resources Received and Provided Free of Charge

Resources received free of charge are recorded as a revenue and as either an expense in the Statement of Comprehensive Income at fair value or an asset in the Statement of Financial Position. The revenue is separately disclosed under resources received free of charge, with the expense or asset being recorded in the line item to which it relates. Goods and services received free of charge from ACT Government agencies are recorded as resources received free of charge, whereas goods and services received free of charge from entities external to the ACT Government are recorded as donations. Services that are received free of charge are only recorded in the Statement of Comprehensive Income if they can be reliably measured and would have been purchased if not provided to the LDA free of charge. Resources provided free of charge are recorded at their fair value in the expense line items to which they relate.

(g) Repairs and Maintenance

The LDA undertakes cyclical maintenance as required on its buildings and plant and equipment. Where the maintenance leads to an upgrade of the asset, and increases the service potential of the existing buildings or plant and equipment, the cost is capitalised. Maintenance expenses which do not increase the service potential of the asset are expensed.

(h) Waivers of Debt

Debts that are waived under Section 131 of the Financial Management Act 1996 are expensed during the year in which the right to payment was waived. Further details of waivers are disclosed at Note 21: Waivers, Impairment Losses and Write-offs.

(i) Taxation

The LDA is registered with the National Tax Equivalent Regime, and is required to calculate income tax in accordance with the Income Tax Assessment Act 1997 and to account for the resulting amounts under the requirements of AASB 112 ‘Income Taxes’.

Suburban Land Agency Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements For the Year Ended 30 June 2013

NOTE 2 SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES - CONTINUED

(i) Taxation - Continued

The charge for the current income tax equivalent expense is based on the surplus/(deficit) for the year adjusted for any non-assessable or non-deductible items. It is calculated using the tax rates that have been enacted or are substantially enacted by the balance date.

Deferred tax is accounted for using the balance sheet liability method in respect of temporary differences arising between the tax bases of assets and liabilities and their carrying amounts in the financial statements. No deferred income tax will be recognised from the initial recognition of an asset or liability, excluding a business combination, where there is no effect on accounting or taxable surplus or deficit.

Deferred tax is calculated at the tax rates that are expected to apply to the period when the asset is realised or the liability settled. Deferred tax is credited in the Statement of Comprehensive Income except where it relates to items that may be credited directly to equity, in which case the deferred tax is adjusted directly against equity.

Deferred income tax assets are recognised to the extent that it is probable that future tax profits will be available against which deductible temporary differences can be utilised. Deferred tax assets are reviewed at each reporting date and are reduced to the extent that it is no longer probable that the related tax benefit will be realised.

The LDA applies the margin scheme for land which is improved at the date of sale, which allows the sellers of real property to pay Good and Services Tax (GST) equal to one-eleventh of the ‘margin’ rather than one-eleventh of the sales price. The ‘margin is generally the difference between the sale price and a valuation of the property at the relevant date. Where permitted, LDA sells unimproved land ‘GST-free’ consistent with the GST-free supply provisions of A New Tax System (Goods and Services Tax) Act 1999 .

(j) Current and Non-Current Items

Assets and liabilities are classified as current or non-current in the Statement of Financial Position and in the relevant notes. Assets are classified as current where they are expected to be realised within 12 months after the reporting date. Liabilities are classified as current when they are due to be settled within 12 months after the reporting date or the LDA does not have an unconditional right to defer settlement of the liability for at least 12 months after the reporting date.

Assets or liabilities which do not fall within the current classification are classified as non-current.

(k) Impairment of Assets

The LDA assesses, at each reporting date, whether there is any indication that an asset may be impaired. Assets are also reviewed for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount may not be recoverable.

Any resulting impairment losses for land and buildings are recognised as a decrease in the available Asset Revaluation Surplus relating to these assets. Where the impairment loss is greater than the available balance in the Asset Revaluation Surplus for the asset, the difference is expensed in the Statement of Comprehensive Income. Impairment losses for plant and equipment and leasehold improvements are recognised in the Statement of Comprehensive Income. Also, in all cases the carrying amount of the asset is reduced to its recoverable amount.

Impairment of receivables is discussed at 2(n): Receivables.

Suburban Land Agency Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements For the Year Ended 30 June 2013

NOTE 2 SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES - CONTINUED

(l) Cash and Cash Equivalents

For the purposes of the Cash Flow Statement and the Statement of Financial Position, cash includes cash at bank, cash on hand and cash equivalents. Cash equivalents are short-term, highly liquid investments that are readily convertible to known amounts of cash and are not subject to price risk. Cash equivalents include short-term investments held in the Cash Facility with the Territory Banking Account. Units within the Cash Facility are not subject to price risk as the Territory Banking Account maintains the unit price at $1. Bank overdrafts are included in cash and cash equivalents in the Cash Flow Statement but not in the cash and cash equivalents line on the Statement of Financial Position.

(m) Investments

The LDA held units in the Cash Enhanced Portfolio administered by the then Territory Banking Account until 31 March 2012. Units within the Cash Enhanced Portfolio were subject to price risk which may result in unrealised gains or losses at balance date. All short-term investment funds are held now in the Cash Facility of the Territory Banking Account (see Note 24). The cash facility is not subject to price risk (see Note 38).

(n) Receivables

Receivables include the Right to Receive Infrastructure, Trade Receivables, Deferred Payment Receivables, Accrued Revenue and Goods and Services Tax Refunds Due.

Right to Receive Infrastructure

The sale of land by the LDA can involve the receipt of cash as well as the value of infrastructure assets (such as roads, services and landscaping) required to be constructed by the purchaser as part of the sale conditions. Upon its completion and handover to the LDA by the purchaser, the infrastructure works are transferred to the Territory and Municipal Services Directorate (TAMS) and ACTEW Corporation (ACTEW). At contract settlement, the LDA recognises the value of the infrastructure to be developed as a receivable.

Trade Receivables

Trade Receivables arise in the normal course of providing goods and services to other agencies and the public. Trade Receivables are payable within 30 days after the issue of an invoice or after the goods or services have been provided under a contractual arrangement and in accordance with the terms and conditions of that contract.

The collectability of receivables is reviewed on an on-going basis. Receivables which are known to be uncollectable are written-off.

Deferred Payment Receivables

Should sale proceeds be received by instalments over more than 12 months, the initial amount to be recorded as a receivable is the fair value calculated by discounting the future instalments using a prevailing rate for a similar instrument of an issuer with a similar credit rating to the LDA. The deferred payment receivable is increased by the amount recognised as interest revenue during the reporting period so that the carrying amount of the receivable at the end of the discount period equals the final cash payment to be received. Refer Note 2(e): Revenue Recognition.

Accrued Revenue

Accrued Revenue is recognised for goods and services provided to other agencies and the public prior to the end of the financial year and for which an invoice had not been raised.

Suburban Land Agency Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements For the Year Ended 30 June 2013

NOTE 2 SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES - CONTINUED

(n) Receivables - Continued

Goods and Services Tax Refunds Due

Goods and Services Tax refunds due reflect the amounts of Goods and Services Tax input credits claimed or available to be claimed from the Australian Taxation Office, net of any Goods and Services Tax collected but not remitted to the Australian Taxation Office. GST receivable is classified in Note 25 as trade receivable.

Impairment of Receivables

Any allowance for impairment of receivables represents the amount of trade and other receivables the LDA estimates will not be repaid. The allowance for impairment losses is based on objective evidence and a review of overdue balances. LDA considers the following is objective evidence of impairment:

  1. (a) becoming aware of financial difficulties of debtors;
  2. (b) default payments; or
  3. (c) debts being more than 90 days overdue.

The amount of any allowance for impairment losses is the difference between the asset’s carrying amount and the present value of the estimated future cash flows, discounted at the current effective interest rate. Cash flows relating to short-term receivables are not discounted if the effect of discounting is immaterial. The amount of the allowance is recognised in the Statement of Comprehensive Income. The allowance for impairment losses is written back against the receivables account when the LDA ceases action to collect the debt as it considers that it will cost more to recover the debt than the debt is worth. Receivables that have been renegotiated because they are past due or impaired are accounted for based on the renegotiated terms.

(o) Property, Plant and Equipment

Acquisition and Recognition of Property, Plant and Equipment

Property, Plant and Equipment are initially recorded at cost. Cost includes the purchase price, directly attributable costs and the estimated cost of dismantling and removing the item (where, upon acquisition, there is a present obligation to remove the item). Where Property, Plant and Equipment is acquired at no cost, or minimal cost, cost is its fair value as at the date of acquisition. The LDA capitalises all non-current physical assets with a value of $5,000 or more.

Measurement of Property, Plant and Equipment After Initial Recognition

Land and buildings are measured at fair value. Plant and equipment and leasehold improvements are measured at cost.

Fair value is the amount for which an asset could be exchanged between knowledgeable willing parties in an arm's length transaction. Fair value is measured using market based evidence available for that asset (or a similar asset), as this is the best evidence of an asset’s fair value. Where the market price for an asset cannot be obtained, because the asset is specialised and is rarely sold, depreciated replacement cost is used as fair value.

Suburban Land Agency Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements For the Year Ended 30 June 2013

NOTE 2 SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES - CONTINUED

(o) Property, Plant and Equipment - Continued

Land is recorded at fair value and buildings are measured using depreciated replacement cost. The LDA obtains an independent valuation for its land and buildings every two years. The latest valuation was as at 30 June 2013.

If at any time management considers the carrying amount of an asset materially differs from its fair value, then the asset will be revalued regardless of when the last valuation took place. Land and buildings that are acquired between revaluations are held at cost until the next valuation, where they are re-valued to fair value.

Intangible Assets

The LDA's intangible assets are comprised of externally acquired software for internal use.

Externally acquired software is recognised and capitalised when:

  1. (i) it is probable that the expected future economic benefits that are attributable to the software will flow to the LDA;
  2. (ii) the cost of the software can be measured reliably; and
  3. (iii) the acquisition cost is equal to or exceeds $50,000.

Capitalised software has a finite useful life. Software is amortised on a straight-line basis over its useful life.

Intangible Assets are measured at cost.

Depreciation of Non-Current Assets

Buildings, leasehold improvements and plant and equipment are systematically depreciated over their useful lives in a manner that reflects the consumption of their service potential. The useful lives of all assets held by the LDA are reassessed on an annual basis.

Land has an unlimited useful life and is therefore not depreciated.

Leasehold improvements and motor vehicles under a finance lease are depreciated over the estimated useful life of each asset, or the unexpired period of the relevant lease, whichever is shorter.

All depreciation is calculated after first deducting any residual values which remain for each asset.

Depreciation for non-current assets is determined as follows:

Class of AssetDepreciation / AmortisationUseful Life (Years)*
BuildingsStraight Line10-50
Leasehold ImprovementsStraight Line5
Plant and EquipmentStraight Line3-5
Motor Vehicles under a Finance LeaseStraight Line2-3
IntangiblesStraight Line2-5

* Useful life commences when an asset is first acquired. When an asset is re-valued, it is depreciated over the remaining useful life of that asset.

(p) Inventories

Inventories held for sale include Developed Land and Work in Progress and are valued at the lower of cost and net realisable value. Work in Progress costs are transferred to Developed Land when a specific development stage receives Operational Acceptance and therefore becomes available for sale. The cost of Developed Land includes the acquisition cost as well as any development costs incurred in development of the land.

Land Acquisitions

Unleased Territory land is acquired at market value and the LDA makes payment to TAMS when the land is sold. The LDA also purchases land from third parties at market value as required. The LDA also receives land through transfers from other ACT Government agencies.

Capitalised Development Costs

Costs of development are costs that directly relate to preparing sites for sale as serviced land. These include expenditure associated with the implementation of estate planning, demolition, remediation activities, and relocation or construction of infrastructure services. Costs associated with marketing and selling activities, feasibility analysis and preliminary development designs are not considered to be directly related to the preparation of the sites for sale as serviced land, and are expensed as incurred.

Land sites held for development and sale are classified as current assets when they are expected to be sold within one year.

(q) Payables

Payables are a financial liability and are measured at the fair value of the consideration received when initially recognised and at amortised cost subsequent to initial recognition, with any adjustments to the carrying amount being recorded in the Statement of Comprehensive Income. All amounts are normally settled within 30 days after the invoice date.

Payables include Trade Payables, Accrued Expenses, Payable to TAMS for Land Sold and Other Payables.

Trade Payables represent the amounts owing for goods and services received prior to the end of the reporting period and unpaid at the end of the reporting period and relating to the normal operations of the LDA.

Accrued expenses represent goods and services provided by other parties during the period, where an invoice has not been received and a payment has not been made by the end of the reporting period.

The payable to TAMS for land sold, represents the cost to the LDA of blocks sold to third parties that remains unpaid at the end of the reporting period.

Other payables include retention monies, land rent security payments and joint venture creditors. Retention monies reflect amounts unpaid on progress claims by construction contractors that are held by the LDA, pending satisfactory completion of works under the terms of the contracts.

Land rent security payments are amounts held by the LDA in respect of land rent blocks sold after 18 February 2013. Following settlement, the security amount is transferred to the ACT Revenue Office and credited against future land rent. The security payment is retained by the LDA to offset the costs of holding and re-selling the land in the event that a person enters into a contract for the purchase of land and, in breach of the contract, refuses to complete the purchase.

(r) Other Provisions

Provision for Project Completions

For any parcel of Developed Land, an estimate is made of the amount of work still to be completed by the LDA. This estimate takes the form of a ‘Project Completion percentage’ and is calculated on a monthly basis. The Provision for Project Completions is a calculation combining the total estimated costs of each finished parcel of Developed Land together with the project completion percentage. Accordingly, the proportion of costs anticipated but not yet incurred are accounted for in this provision.

Provision to Transfer Infrastructure

The sale of land by the LDA can involve the receipt of cash as well as the value of infrastructure assets (such as roads, services and landscaping) required to be constructed by the purchaser as part of the sale conditions. Upon completion, the infrastructure works are transferred to TAMS and ACTEW Corporation. At contract settlement, the LDA recognises the value of the future infrastructure as a liability.

(s) Joint Ventures

Jointly Controlled Entities

The LDA uses the equity method to account for its interest in three unincorporated jointly controlled entities (Forde Joint Venture, Crace Joint Venture and Woden East Joint Venture). Under the equity method, the interest in a jointly controlled entity is initially recognised at cost. After initial recognition, this interest is adjusted for any postacquisition change in the share of the jointly controlled entity’s net assets and is reflected in the Statement of Financial Position. The Statement of Comprehensive Income includes the share of the profit or loss of the jointly controlled entity.

Unrealised profits and losses associated with the contribution of development rights to the jointly controlled entity have been eliminated.

(t) Employee Benefits and On-Costs

Employee benefits include accrued salaries and superannuation, annual leave, annual leave loading and long service leave. On-costs include payroll tax and fringe benefits tax. Employee benefits accrue as a result of services provided by employees up to the reporting period that remain unpaid. They are recorded as a liability and as an expense.

Accrued Salaries and Superannuation

Accrued salaries and superannuation are measured at the amount that remains unpaid to employees at the end of the reporting period.

Accrued Annual and Long Service Leave

Annual leave and long service leave that fall due wholly within the next 12 months are measured based on the estimated amount of remuneration payable when the leave is taken

Annual and long service leave including applicable on-costs that do not fall due within the next 12 months are measured at the present value of estimated future payments to be made in respect of services provided by employees up to the end of the reporting period. Consideration is given to the future wage and salary levels, experience of employee departures and periods of service. At each reporting period end, the present value of the future payments is calculated using market yields on Commonwealth Government bonds with terms to maturity that match, as closely as possible, the estimated future cash flows. In 2012-13, the rate used to estimate the present value of these future payments is 101.3% (106.6% in 2011-12).

The long service leave liability is estimated with reference to the minimum period of qualifying service. For employees with less than the required minimum period of 7 years of qualifying service, the probability that employees will reach the required minimum period has been taken into account in estimating the provision for long service leave and the applicable on-costs.

The provision for annual leave and long service leave includes estimated on-costs. As these on-costs only become payable if the employee takes annual and long service leave while in-service, the probability that employees will take annual and long service leave while in service has been taken into account in estimating the liability for on-costs.

Annual leave and long service leave liabilities are classified as current liabilities in the Statement of Financial Position where there is no unconditional right to defer the settlement of the liability for at least 12 months. However, where there is an unconditional right to defer the settlement of the liability for at least 12 months, annual leave and long service leave have been classified as a non-current liability in the Statement of Financial Position.

(u) Superannuation

Superannuation payments are made to the Territory Banking Account each fortnight to cover the LDA's superannuation liability for the Commonwealth Superannuation Scheme (CSS) and the Public Sector Superannuation Scheme (PSS). This payment covers the CSS/PSS employer contribution but does not include the productivity component. The productivity component is paid directly to ComSuper by the LDA. The CSS and PSS are defined benefit superannuation plans meaning that the defined benefits received by employees are based on the employee's years of service and final average salary.

Superannuation payments have also been made directly to superannuation funds for those employees who are part of superannuation accumulation schemes. This includes the Public Sector Superannuation Scheme Accumulation Plan (PSSAP) and schemes of employee choice.

Superannuation employer contribution payments, for the CSS and PSS, are calculated by taking the salary level at an employee's anniversary date and multiplying it by the actuarially assessed nominal CSS or PSS employer contribution rate for each employee. The productivity component payments are calculated by taking the salary level, at an employee's anniversary date, and multiplying it by the employer contribution rate (approximately 3%) for each employee. Superannuation payments for the PSSAP are calculated by taking the salary level, at an employee's anniversary date, and multiplying it by the appropriate employer contribution rate. Superannuation payments for fund of choice arrangements are calculated by taking an employee's salary each pay and multiplying it by the appropriate employer contribution rate.

A superannuation liability is not recognised in the Statement of Financial Position as the Superannuation Provision Account recognises the total Territory superannuation liability for the CSS and PSS, and ComSuper and the external schemes recognise the superannuation liability for the PSSAP and other schemes respectively.

The ACT Government is liable for the reimbursement of the emerging costs of benefits paid each year to members of the CSS and PSS in respect of the ACT Government service provided after 1 July 1989. These reimbursement payments are made from the Superannuation Provision Account.

(v) Equity Contributed by the ACT Government

Contributions made by the ACT Government through its role as owner of the LDA are treated as contributions of equity.

(w) Insurance

Major risks are insured through the ACT Insurance Authority. The excess payable, under this arrangement, varies depending on each class of insurance held.

(x) Leases

The LDA has entered into operating leases and finance leases.

Operating Leases

In respect of operating leases, the lessor effectively retains substantially all of the risks and benefits incidental to ownership of the assets under an operating lease. Operating lease payments are recorded as an expense in the Statement of Comprehensive Income on a straight line basis over the term of the lease.

Finance Leases

Finance leases effectively transfer, to the lessee, substantially the risk and benefits incidental to ownership of the assets under a finance lease and are initially recognised as assets and liabilities at the lower of fair value and the present value of the minimum lease payments. Where there is reasonable assurance that the LDA will obtain ownership of the asset at the end of the lease term, the asset is depreciated over its useful life, otherwise it is depreciated over the lease term. Assets under a finance lease are depreciated on a straight-line basis. The depreciation is calculated after first deducting any residual values which remain for each leased asset. Minimum lease payments are allocated between interest expense and reduction of the lease liability, according to the interest rate implicit in the lease.

(y) Finished Inventory - Land Value

The land value of finished inventory represents the land portion of inventory ready for sale but yet to be sold. This is recorded as a liability as the LDA is obligated to pay TAMS for the value of land once it is sold.

(z) Impact of Accounting Standards Issued but yet to be Applied

The following new and revised accounting standards and interpretations have been issued by the Australian Accounting Standards Board but do not apply to the current reporting period. The application date applies to the first reporting beginning on or after this date. LDA does not intend to adopt these standards and interpretations early. Where applicable, these Australian Accounting Standards will be adopted from their application date. It is expected that the effect of adopting the below pronouncements, when applicable, will have no material financial impact on LDA in future reporting periods:

  • AASB 9 Financial Instruments (application date 1 January 2015);
  • AASB 11 Joint Arrangements (application date 1 January 2013 for for-profit entities and 1 January 2014 for not-forprofit entities);
  • AASB 12 Disclosure of Interests in Other Entities (application date 1 January 2013 for for-profit entities and 1 January 2014 for not-for-profit entities);
  • AASB 13 Fair Value Measurement (application date 1 January 2013);
  • AASB 119 Employee Benefits (application date 1 January 2013);
  • AASB 127 Separate Financial Statements (application date 1 January 2013 for for-profit entities and 1 January 2014 for not-for-profit entities);
  • AASB 128 Investments in Associates and Joint Ventures (application date 1 January 2013 for for-profit entities and 1 January 2014 for not-for-profit entities);
  • AASB 2010-7 Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards arising from AASB 9 (December 2010) [AASB 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 101, 102, 108, 112, 118, 120, 121, 127, 128, 131, 132, 136, 137, 139, 1023, 1038 and Interpretations 2, 5, 10, 12, 19 and 127] (application date 1 January 2013);12, 19 and 127] (application date 1 January 2015);
  • AASB 2011-4 Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards to Remove Individual Key Management Personnel Disclosure Requirements [AASB 124] (application date 1 July 2013);
  • AASB 2011-7 Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards arising from the Consolidation and Joint Arrangements Standards [AASB 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 9, 2009-11, 101, 107, 112, 118, 121, 124, 132, 133, 136, 138, 139, 1023 & 1038 and Interpretations 5, 9, 16 & 17] (application date 1 January 2013 for for-profit entities and 1 January 2014 for not-for-profit entities);
  • AASB 2011-8 Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards arising from AASB 13 [AASB 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 9, 2009-11, 101, 107, 112, 118, 119, 120, 121, 128, 131, 132, 133, 134, 136, 138, 139, 140, 141, 1004, 1023, 1038 and Interpretations 2, 4, 12, 13, 14, 17, 19, 131 and 132] (application date 1 January 2013);
  • AASB 2011-10 Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards arising from AASB 119 (September 2011) [AASB 1, AASB 8, AASB 101, AASB 124, AASB 134, AASB 1049, AASB 2011-8 and Interpretation 14] (application date 1 January 2013);
  • AASB 2012-2 Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards – Disclosures – Offsetting Financial Assets and Financial Liabilities [AASB 7 & AASB 132] (application date 1 January 2013);
  • AASB 2012-3 Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards – Offsetting Financial Assets and Financial Liabilities [AASB 132] (application date 1 January 2014);
  • AASB 2012-5 Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards arising from Annual Improvements 2009-2011 Cycle [AASB 1, AASB 101, AASB 116, AASB 132 & AASB 134 and Interpretation 2] (application date 1 January 2013);
  • AASB 2012-6 Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards – Mandatory Effective Date AASB 9 and Transition Disclosures [AASB 9, AASB 2009-11, AASB 2010-7 & AASB 2011-8] (application date 1 January 2013); and
  • AASB 2012-9 Amendment to AASB 1048 arising from the Withdrawal of Australian Interpretation 139 (application date 1 January 2013); and
  • AASB 2012-10 Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards – Transition Guidance and Other Amendments [AASB 1, 5, 7, 8, 10, 11, 12, 13, 101, 102, 108, 112, 118, 119, 127, 128, 132, 133, 134, 137, 1023, 1038, 1039, 1049 & 2011-7 and Interpretation 12] (application date 1 January 2013).

Suburban Land Agency Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements For the Year Ended 30 June 2013

NOTE 3 CHANGE IN ACCOUNTING ESTIMATES

Change in Accounting Estimates

Bi-annual review of project costing

The Bi-Annual Reviews for 2012-13 resulted in adjustments to the total estimated costs of various projects including the reduction of the total estimated costs for Bonner by $3.0 million, Franklin by $6.4 million, Harrison 4 by $3.9 million, Wright by $0.7 million and Jacka $1.2 million, partially offset by an increase in the total estimated costs for Kingston Foreshore by $9.1 million. The overall impact of the adjustment was to decrease Cost of Land Sold and increase inventory by $6.1 million and therefore increase the Operating Surplus before Income Tax Equivalents by $6.1 million.

Revision of Estimation of the Employee Benefit Liability

As disclosed in Note 2(t) Employee Benefits and On-Costs, the estimated future payments for annual and long service leave that do not fall due within the next 12 months are measured at present value of estimated payments to be made in respect of services provided by employees up to the reporting date. The LDA uses a rate to estimate the present value of long service and annual leave liabilities classified as long-term. This method takes into account future wage increases adjusted to present value using the Commonwealth Government bond rate. Last financial year the rate was 106.6%, however, due to a change in the Commonwealth Government bond rate, the rate is now 101.3%. This change decreased the value of long service leave liabilities by $126,000.

Suburban Land Agency Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements For the Year Ended 30 June 2013

NOTE 4 SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING JUDGEMENTS AND ESTIMATES

In the process of applying the accounting policies listed in this note, the LDA has made the following judgements and estimates that have the most significant impact on the amounts recorded in the financial statements:

  1. Fair Value of Assets: The LDA has made a significant judgement regarding the fair value of its assets. Land has been recorded at fair value and buildings have been recorded at the depreciated replacement cost as determined by an independent valuer. In some circumstances, buildings that are purpose built may in fact realise more or less than their carrying values.
    The depreciated replacement cost is used to estimate fair value due to a lack of market-based evidence of similar sales because the assets are heritage listed and do not have a Crown lease.
  2. Employee Benefits: Significant judgements have been applied in estimating the liability for employee benefits. The estimated liability for employee benefits requires consideration of the future wage and salary levels, experience of employee departures and periods of service. The estimate also includes an assessment of the probability that employees will meet the minimum service period required to qualify for long service leave and that on-costs will become payable. Further information on this estimate is provided in Note 2 (t) Employee Benefits and On-Costs and Note 3 Change in Accounting Estimates.
  3. Inventories: The cost of unleased Territory land acquired from Government by the LDA is recorded at the lower of cost and net realisable value. Significant judgement has been made using management experience to determine net realisable value of the land. The cost of land held for resale includes the acquisition cost as well as any development costs incurred in developing the land.
  4. Project Costing: As detailed at Note 2(r): Other Provisions, the LDA has made a significant estimate of its Provision for Project Completions based on the difference between the actual expenditure incurred to date, the estimated percentage of the project that is complete and total forecast expenditure. The methodology is a consultative process involving both financial and operational executive staff. The calculations are based on invoices paid to date, accrued expenditure and an estimation of costs still to be incurred to ensure satisfactory completion of the project. Furthermore, an appropriate contingency is calculated based on management experience and expertise together with accepted industry norms.
  5. Allocation of Costs to Blocks Sold: Significant estimates have been made to calculate the cost of each block of land sold. The methodology applied allocates a percentage of the estimated total forecast expenditure (including capitalised development costs and land costs) to each individual block based on the square metres of each individual block as a proportion of the overall size of the land being developed.
  6. Impairment of Assets: The LDA has made a judgement regarding its impairment of assets by undertaking a process of reviewing any likely impairment factors. The LDA performed an assessment of any indication of impairment by completing an impairment checklist. This process indicates that no asset impairments exist.
  7. Depreciation: The LDA has made a significant estimate in the lengths of useful lives over which its assets are depreciated. This estimation is the period in which utility will be gained from the use of assets, based on estimates from officers of the LDA.
  1. Interest Rate Applicable to Deferred Payment Receivables: The LDA has made an estimate of the imputed rate of interest required to discount the contracted value (nominal value) of consideration to the fair value of consideration for those sales where payment has been deferred for more than 12 months. This occurs when proceeds are received by instalments. The imputed rate of interest is calculated on a case by case basis and involves estimating the prevailing rate for a similar instrument that would be offered by an issuer with a similar credit rating to the the LDA.

Suburban Land Agency Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements For the Year Ended 30 June 2013

Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements

(a) The decrease was primarily due to the finalisation of land sales in the Bonner, Flemington Road and Harrison 4 estates; partially offset by increased sales in Jacka and Wright.

(b) The were no Englobo Sales in 2012-13.

(c) The decreases in commercial and industrial land sales was due to lower demand in the commercial and industrial sector.

(d) In certain circumstances, the Government may release land by ‘direct sale’ where a lease is offered for sale without going through a competitive process. The decrease in community land sales was due to several direct sales being extended or deferred to 2013-14.

(e) The LDA received extra revenue from the land purchasers following variations to holding leases, resulting in higher dwelling yields than initially planned.

(f) The decrease in infrastructure delivered by third parties was due to a decreased number of contracts settled that required infrastructure to be delivered by third parties.

(g) The LDA identified an entitlement to GST refunds as a result of changes in the Australian Taxation Office’s interpretations of eligibility to apply the Government Margin Scheme. The meaning of ‘land on which there are no improvements’ is now considered to be broader than it once was, meaning the LDA can apply the scheme to a broader range of circumstances, which led to a significant entitlement to GST refunds for prior year land sales in 2012-13.

Suburban Land Agency Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements For the Year Ended 30 June 2013

Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements

(a) The LDA provided financial management services and executive services to the Economic Development Directorate (EDD) under the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between EDD and the LDA .

(b) In 2011-12 the net payment under the MOU was disclosed in Grants and Purchased Services. However, in 2012-13 the payment have been disclosed on a gross basis with payment for services provided by LDA to EDD included in User Charges and payments to EDD for services provided disclosed in Grants and Purchased Services. The comparative figures have been reclassified consistent with this treatment. For further details refer to Note 44: related Party Disclosures.

NOTE 7 USER CHARGES - NON-ACT GOVERNMENT

NOTE 7 USER CHARGES - NON-ACT GOVERNMENT

(a) The LDA derived rental income from sites in Civic, Kingston and Gungahlin.

NOTE 8 INTEREST

NOTE 8 INTEREST

(a) Interest revenue increased in 2012-13 due to LDA receiving interest revenue from the Cash Facility held in the Treasury Investment Fund, following a transfer of cash from the Cash Enhanced Facility, see note 2(m).

(b) Other interest revenue decreased due to a reduction in contract defaulters, resulting in lower late settlement penalty interest received in 2012-13.

Suburban Land Agency Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements For the Year Ended 30 June 2013

Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements

(a) The decrease was due to the LDA transferring funds from the Cash Enhanced Fund to the Cash Facility during 2011-12, see note 2(m). The LDA now receives interest on these funds, see Note 8: Interest.

NOTE 10 RESOURCES RECEIVED FREE OF CHARGE

Resources received free of charge relate to goods and/or services being provided free of charge from other entities within the ACT Government.

NOTE 10 RESOURCES RECEIVED FREE OF CHARGE

(a) The resources received free of charge relate to transfers of land from other ACT Government Directorates to the LDA at no cost. The increase was due to the transfer of Barton 2/10 (Hotel Kurrajong) and Ngunnawal 108/23 from TAMS.

NOTE 11 OTHER REVENUE

NOTE 11 OTHER REVENUE

(a) The LDA continued to receive revenue from the Commonwealth Housing Affordability Fund to meet its obligations to provide affordable housing to the community. The decrease in revenue was due to the completion of the program in Bonner.

(b) Miscellaneous revenue included put and call option fees, land rent fees and retained deposits for terminated contracts. The increase in miscellaneous revenue was primarily due to an increase in retained deposits for sales contracts terminated by prospective purchasers.

Suburban Land Agency Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements For the Year Ended 30 June 2013

Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements

(a) The decrease was due to all short-term investment funds being held now in the Cash Facility of the Treasury Investment Fund which is not subject to price risk, see note 2(m).

NOTE 13 EMPLOYEE EXPENSES

NOTE 13 EMPLOYEE EXPENSES

NOTE 14 SUPERANNUATION EXPENSES

NOTE 14 SUPERANNUATION EXPENSES

Suburban Land Agency Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements For the Year Ended 30 June 2013

Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements

(a) The increase was primarily due to costs associated with a review of the application of GST on land sales by the LDA.

(b) The increase was primarily due to the solar water and landscape rebate payments in Bonner, Harrison 4 and Wright.

(c) The increase was due to increased costs for the repair and maintenance of the Old Bus Depot, Kingston.

(d) The increase was due to the development of a new sales and marketing online system, an increase in signage and an increase in the number of community activities and events.

(e) The decrease was due to reduced contract works insurance as a result of the decrease in capital works expenditure in 2012-13.

(f) The decrease was mainly due to the write-off of capitalised software costs in 2011-12.

NOTE 16 DEPRECIATION AND AMORTISATION

NOTE 16 DEPRECIATION AND AMORTISATION

(a) The increase was due to the depreciation of new fit-out in LDA Dickson Office.

Suburban Land Agency Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements For the Year Ended 30 June 2013

Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements

NOTE 17 GRANTS AND PURCHASED SERVICES

Grants are amounts provided to ACT Government agencies and non-ACT Government agencies for general assistance or for a particular purpose. Grants may be for capital, current or recurrent purposes and the name or category reflects the use of the grant. The grants given are usually subject to terms and conditions set out in the contract, correspondence, or by legislation.

Purchased services are amounts paid to obtain services from other ACT Government agencies and external parties.

NOTE 17 GRANTS AND PURCHASED SERVICES

(a) LDA continued to receive revenue from the Commonwealth Housing Affordability Fund (HAF) in order to meet its obligations to provide affordable housing to the community. Funding was received by the LDA for projects in Gungaderra and Crace and subsequently forwarded to LDA's project partners in line with contractual agreements.

(b) Purchased services comprised:

NOTE 17 GRANTS AND PURCHASED SERVICES

(a) In 2011-12 the net payment under the MOU was disclosed in Grants and Purchased Services. However, in 2012-13 the payment have been disclosed on a gross basis with payment for services provided by LDA to EDD included in User Charges and payments to EDD for services provided disclosed in Grants and Purchased Services. The comparative figures have been reclassified consistent with this treatment. For further details refer to Note 44.

(b) The decrease was due to a re-examination of the Service Level Agreement and a rationalisation of computer equipment across the agency.

(c) Consistent with the Law Officers (General) Legal Directions 2012 , the LDA has entered into an agreement with the ACT Government Solicitor's Office for the provision of legal services.

Suburban Land Agency Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements For the Year Ended 30 June 2013

Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements

Cost of Land Sold is the current estimate of the cost of inventories sold during the reporting period, which includes the acquisition of land, direct costs relating to the development of land and the value of infrastructure constructed by land purchasers and transferred to the Territory and Municipal Services Directorate, ACTEW Corporation Limited and ActewAGL.

In addition to the above, estimates of the Cost of Land Sold are reviewed on a bi-annual basis and the result of the 2012-13 Bi-annual Reviews was to decrease Cost of Land Sold by $6.173 million, refer Note 3: Change in Accounting Estimates.

(a) The estimated cost of inventories sold, as detailed above, are expensed in the Statement of Comprehensive Income at the point the developed land is sold. The decrease in the value of land sold was primarily due to the decrease in overall land sales.

(b) The decrease in Transfer of Infrastructure Assets was due to a decreased number of contracts settled that required infrastructure to be delivered by third parties.

NOTE 19 INTEREST EXPENSE

NOTE 19 INTEREST EXPENSE

(a) Consistent with the ACT Government’s policy on competitive neutrality, the LDA applies similar costing and pricing principles, taxation and debt guarantee requirements and appropriate regulations as a fully corporatised business (see Note 2b). During 2012-13, the LDA reached an agreement with CMTD for the process and method to be applied for the payment of land holding cost equivalents (interest) on land purchased from the Territory for development.

Suburban Land Agency Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements For the Year Ended 30 June 2013

Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements

(a) Consistent with the ACT Government’s policy on competitive neutrality, the LDA applies similar costing and pricing principles, taxation and debt guarantee requirements and appropriate regulations as a fully corporatised business (see note 2b). During 2012-13, the LDA reached an agreement with CMTD for the process and method to be applied for the payment of stamp duty equivalents on land purchased from the Territory for development.

(b) The decrease was due to the one-off transfer of Gungahlin 6/58 to the Health Directorate free of charge in 2011-12 for a new community health centre.

(c) The decrease was due to the one-off payment to the Capital Woodland and Wetlands Conservation Trust in 2011-12, to manage two of the Territory's most special natural areas: the Jerrabomberra Wetlands and Mulligan's Flat Woodland Sanctuary. The LDA will benefit from this contribution through enhanced land value for sites being developed adjacent to these two areas.

(d) The LDA incurs costs during the processing of direct grant applications. In the event a direct sale is terminated with no revenue received, costs are categorised as inventory write-off rather than a cost of land sold.

(e) The decrease was due to a one-off payment relating to a settlement with the Australian Taxation Office (ATO) in respect to GST payable for sales of land to the Crace Joint Venture in 2011-12.

(f) Inventories held for sale are valued at the lower of cost and net realisable value. The difference between the cost and net realisable value is recorded as an Inventory Loss.

(g) The increase was due to the LDA donating the proceeds from the sale of Franklin Charity House to a number of charities in 2012-13.

(h) The LDA’s 2012-13 Statement of Intent noted that the LDA would support progressing the redevelopment of the transit corridor between Civic and Gungahlin. As part of this strategy, the LDA provided a contribution to the Capital Metro project in 2012-13.

Suburban Land Agency Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements For the Year Ended 30 June 2013

Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements

NOTE 21 WAIVERS, IMPAIRMENT LOSSES AND WRITE-OFFS

During the reporting period, there were no Impairment Losses or Write-offs. There were no Waivers pursuant to Section 131 of the Financial Management Act 1996 (2011-12: Nil).

NOTE 22 AUDITOR'S REMUNERATION

Auditor’s remuneration consists of financial audit services provided to the LDA by the ACT Auditor-General’s Office. No other services were provided by the ACT Auditor-General's Office.

NOTE 22 AUDITOR'S REMUNERATION

NOTE 23 INCOME TAX EQUIVALENTS

NOTE 23 INCOME TAX EQUIVALENTS

(a) The decrease in income tax equivalents is due to the decreased operating surplus before tax.

Suburban Land Agency Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements For the Year Ended 30 June 2013

Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements

NOTE 25 RECEIVABLES

NOTE 25 RECEIVABLES

(a) The decrease is primarily due to decreased land rent sales, resulting in lower proceeds receivable from the Commerce and Works Directorate, partially offset by a receivable from Woden East Pty Ltd following the wind up of Woden East Joint Venture and GST receivable from Australian Taxation Office.

NOTE 25 RECEIVABLES

(1) 'Not Impaired' refers to Net Receivables (that is Gross Receivables less Impaired Receivables).

Suburban Land Agency Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements For the Year Ended 30 June 2013

Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements

(a) The decrease is primarily due to decreased sales proceeds receivable from the Commerce and Works Directorate for land rent sales.

(b) The increase is primarily due to distribution receivable from Woden East Pty Ltd following the wind up of Woden East Joint Venture and GST receivable from Australian Taxation Office.

Suburban Land Agency Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements For the Year Ended 30 June 2013

Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements

(a) The decrease in land available for sale is due to a decrease in unsold finished land in the Bonner, Harrison 4 and Wright estates.

(b) Land acquisitions include costs incurred in acquiring land from the Territory in accordance with the LDA's status as a Public Trading Enterprise (see Note 1(b) Public Trading Enterprise). Acquisitions include land purchased from other parties at market value and the fair value of land transferred from other ACT Government agencies to the LDA for sale.

(c) The increase is due to the increased scale of developments by the LDA including its development activities in Jacka, Molonglo (Wright and Coombs), Kingston Foreshore and New West (Hume).

Suburban Land Agency Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements For the Year Ended 30 June 2013

NOTE 27 PROPERTY, PLANT AND EQUIPMENT

Property, plant and equipment includes the following classes of assets – land and buildings, leasehold improvements, plant and equipment.

Land and Buildings held includes property held for use as office buildings, storage facilities and commercial display space. Land which is used for trading is classified as inventory (See Note 26: Inventories).

Leasehold Improvements represent capital expenditure incurred in relation to leased assets. LDA has fit-outs in its leased buildings.

Plant and Equipment includes motor vehicles under a finance lease, furniture, fittings and office electronic equipment.

NOTE 27 PROPERTY, PLANT AND EQUIPMENT

Valuation of Property, Plant and Equipment

The Australian Valuation Office performed an independent valuation of Land and Buildings as at 30 June 2013.

Reconciliation of Property, Plant and Equipment at 30 June 2013

The following table shows the movement of Property, Plant and Equipment throughout 2012-13.

NOTE 27 PROPERTY, PLANT AND EQUIPMENT

Reconciliation of Property, Plant and Equipment at 30 June 2012

The following table shows the movement of Property, Plant and Equipment throughout 2011-12

NOTE 27 PROPERTY, PLANT AND EQUIPMENT

Carrying Value of Assets Measured at Fair Valued under the Cost Model

The following classes of Property, Plant and Equipment, which are carried at fair value (as indicated above), would have had carrying values, if measured using the cost model, as follows:

NOTE 27 PROPERTY, PLANT AND EQUIPMENT

NOTE 28 INTANGIBLE ASSETS

NOTE 28 INTANGIBLE ASSETS

NOTE 29 OTHER ASSETS

NOTE 29 OTHER ASSETS

(a) In 2011-12, the LDA returned one fleet vehicle, which was at the end of the lease term to SG Fleet (Fleet Manager) to arrange for the vehicle to be sold. The vehicle was then transferred from Fixed Assets to Assets Held for Sale.

(b) The write-off related to the LandTech project which was terminated by LDA in 2011-12.

Suburban Land Agency Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements For the Year Ended 30 June 2013

Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements

(a) The increase is due to increased GST payable to Australian Taxation Office and the introduction of land rent security payments. Land rent security payments are amounts held by the LDA in respect of exchanged contracts for land rent blocks to offset the costs of holding and re-selling the land if the sales contracts is terminated by prospective purchasers.

(b) The decrease in Payable to TAMS for Land Sold is related to lower volumn of land sales in the final quarter of 2012-13.

(c) The increase is mainly due to the accrual of land holding costs and stamp duty equivalents, which were recognised in 2012-13 (see note 1(b)).

Suburban Land Agency Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements For the Year Ended 30 June 2013

NOTE 31 INTEREST-BEARING LIABILITIES

Finance Leases

LDA holds a number of finance leases for motor vehicles. The interest rates implicit in these leases vary from 5.65% to 6.20% and the terms are two to three years. These leases allow for extensions, but have no terms of renewal or purchase options, nor escalation clauses.

NOTE 31 INTEREST-BEARING LIABILITIES

Secured Liability

The LDA's finance lease liability is effectively secured because if the LDA defaults, the assets under a finance lease revert to the lessor.

Finance Leases

Finance lease commitments are payable as follows:

Finance LeasesFinance Leases

Overdraft

The LDA did not go into overdraft during the reporting period.

Suburban Land Agency Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements For the Year Ended 30 June 2013

Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial StatementsNotes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements

Suburban Land Agency Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements For the Year Ended 30 June 2013

Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements

(a) In 2012-13, the increase in the value of Provision for Project Completion related to settlement ready blocks in LDA estates. The major contributions were $2.4 million from Phillip Section 3, $12.7 million from Jacka and $37.2 million from Wright.

(b) The decrease in the Provision for Project Completion in 2012-13 was mainly due to payments made for estate development costs. As the LDA estates became settlement ready, the reduction was aligned with the increase in Provision for Project Completion.

Suburban Land Agency Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements For the Year Ended 30 June 2013

Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements

NOTE 35 OTHER LIABILITIES

NOTE 35 OTHER LIABILITIES

(a) The decrease in dividend payable is due to the decrease in the Operating Surplus and the corresponding dividend declared.

(b) Revenue Received in Advance relates to deposits received for land sales. The decrease is directly related to a decrease in the value of sales contracts that have been exchanged but are yet to settle in Bonner, Wright and Harrison 4 and an increase in land rent sales.

(c) The decrease in land available for sale was due to a decrease in unsold finished land in the Bonner, Harrison 4 and Wright estates.

Suburban Land Agency Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements For the Year Ended 30 June 2013

Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements

NOTE 36 DEFERRED TAX LIABILITY

Deferred tax liabilities are the amounts of income taxes payable in future periods relating to temporary differences between the calculation of accounting and taxation profit.

NOTE 36 DEFERRED TAX LIABILITY

Suburban Land Agency Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements For the Year Ended 30 June 2013

Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements

The Asset Revaluation Surplus is used to record the increments and decrements in the value of land and buildings.

Suburban Land Agency Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements For the Year Ended 30 June 2013

NOTE 38 FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS

Outlined below are the terms and conditions of financial assets and liabilities held by the LDA as at 30 June 2013. Details of significant policies and methods adopted, including the criteria for recognition, the basis of measurement, and the basis on which income and expenses are recognised with respect to each class of financial asset and financial liability are disclosed at Note 2 Summary of Significant Accounting Policies.

Interest Rate Risk

Interest rate risk is the risk that the fair value or future cash flows of a financial instrument will fluctuate because of changes in market interest rates.

The LDA only holds financial assets in floating interest rate arrangements. Therefore, the LDA is not significantly exposed to movements in interest payable. However, it is exposed to movements in interest receivable.

Financial assets subject to floating interest rates include investments held in commercial banking accounts and the Territory Banking Account together with receivables in respect to sales completed via instalments. The LDA manages the interest rate risk on investments held in a commercial banking account and Territory Banking Account by only investing in floating interest rate investments that are low risk, whilst the receivable from instalment payments is not actively managed due to the immateriality of the associated interest payments.

Interest rate risk for financial liabilities is not actively managed by the LDA as the majority of financial liabilities are non-interest bearing.

A sensitivity analysis of the interest rate risk has not been performed, because as disclosed above, the LDA's exposure to interest rate risk is low.

Credit Risk

Credit risk is the risk that one party to a financial instrument will fail to discharge an obligation and cause the other party to incur a financial loss. The LDA’s credit risk is limited to the amount of the financial assets it holds net of any allowance for impairment. The LDA expects to collect all financial assets that are not past due or impaired.

The LDA's credit risk mainly includes the investment of excess cash and exposure to deferred payment receivables. Credit risk is managed by the LDA by only investing surplus funds with the Territory Banking Account, which has appropriate investment criteria for the external fund manager engaged to manage the Territory’s surplus funds.

Credit risk for deferred payment receivables relates to sales in which proceeds are received via instalments. All contracts of this nature are effectively secured by the Deed of Agreement for each sale. Credit risk for Trade Receivables mainly relates to sales proceeds receivable from the Commerce and Works Directorate for land rent sales which is considered to be low risk. Therefore, the exposure to credit risk of the investment of excess cash and loans receivable is low.

Liquidity Risk

Liquidity risk is the risk that the LDA will encounter difficulties in meeting obligations associated with financial liabilities that are settled by delivering cash or another financial asset. To limit its exposure to liquidity risk, the LDA ensures that it does not have a large portion of its financial liabilities maturing in any one reporting period and that, at any particular point in time, it has a sufficient amount of current financial assets to meet its current financial liabilities.

LDA's exposure to liquidity risk and the management of this risk has not changed since the previous reporting period.

Price Risk

Price risk is the risk that the fair value or future cash flows of a financial instrument will fluctuate because of changes in market prices (other than those arising from interest rate risk or currency risk), whether these changes are caused by factors specific to the individual financial instrument or its issuer, or factors affecting all similar financial instruments traded in the market. The LDA is not subject to price risk for its investment in the Cash Facility as the price for each unit is fixed at $1 by the Territory Banking Account.

A sensitivity analysis of the price risk has not been performed, because as disclosed above, the LDA is not exposed to price risk on investment in the Cash Facility.

Fair Value of Financial Assets and Liabilities

The carrying amounts and fair values of financial assets and liabilities at the end of the reporting period are:

Fair Value of Financial Assets and Liabilities

(a) The amounts reported are net of the Right to Receive Infrastructure and Accrued Revenue which do not meet the definition of a Financial Instrument under AASB 139: Financial Instruments: Recognition and Measurement.

Fair Value Hierarchy

The LDA is required to classify financial assets and financial liabilities into a fair value hierarchy that reflects the significance of the inputs used in determining their fair value. The fair value hierarchy is made up of the following three levels:

  • Level 1 - quoted prices (unadjusted) in active markets for identical assets or liabilities;
  • Level 2 - inputs other than quoted prices included within Level 1 that are observable for the asset or liability either directly (i.e. as prices) or indirectly (i.e. derived from prices); and
  • Level 3 - inputs for the asset or liability that are not based on observable market data (unobservable inputs).

All financial assets and liabilities are measured, subsequent to initial recognition, at amortised cost and therefore not required to be disclosed in the fair value hierarchy.

Maturity Analysis

The following table sets out LDA's maturity analysis for financial assets and liabilities as well as the exposure to interest rates, including the weighted average interest rates by maturity period as at 30 June 2013. All financial assets and liabilities which have a floating interest rate or are non-interest bearing will mature in one year or less. All amounts appearing in the following maturity analysis are shown on an undiscounted cash flow basis.

Maturity Analysis

(a) The amounts reported are net of the Right to Receive Infrastructure and Accrued Revenue which do not meet the definition of a Financial Instrument under AASB 139: Financial Instruments: Recognition and Measurement.

The following table sets out the LDA's maturity analysis for financial assets and liabilities as well as the exposure to interest rates, including the weighted average interest rates by maturity period as at 30 June 2012. All financial assets and liabilities which have a floating interest rate or are non-interest bearing will mature in one year or less. All amounts appearing in the following maturity analysis are shown on an undiscounted cash flow basis.

NOTE 38 FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTSNOTE 38 FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS

(a) The amounts reported are net of the Right to Receive Infrastructure which does not meet the definition of a Financial Instrument under AASB 139: Financial Instruments: Recognition and Measurement. LDA does not have any financial assets in the 'Available for Sale' category or the 'Held to Maturity' category and as such these categories are not included above. Also, the LDA does not have any financial liabilities in the 'Financial Liabilities at Fair Value through Profit and Loss' category and as such this category is not included above.

Suburban Land Agency Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements For the Year Ended 30 June 2013

Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements

The operating leases relate to the lease of Dickson Office from the Territory and Municipal Services Directorate and IT plant and equipment and mobile phones provided by Shared Services Centre. The operating lease agreements give the LDA the right to renew the lease. This will result in the terms of the lease becoming renegotiable at the end of the current lease period.

Suburban Land Agency Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements For the Year Ended 30 June 2013

NOTE 40 CONTINGENT LIABILITIES AND CONTINGENT ASSETS

Contingent Liabilities

The ACT Government Solicitor is acting for the Suburban Land Agency in matters involving legal claims. There were no legal claims at balance date (2011-12: $350,000).

The LDA has contingent liability of $7,777,273 for income tax and dividend payments to Government, as a result of the contingent asset for GST refunds outlined below.

Contingent Assets

There were no contingent assets related to legal claims at balance date (2011-12: $340,000).

The LDA has a contingent asset for GST refunds of $7,777,273 as a result of overpayments of GST on land sales in previous financial years. These refunds relate to prior year land sales that the LDA now classifies as ‘GST-free’ land sales. However, the Australian Taxation Office (ATO) had not yet indicated that it agrees with this position. As such, until these refunds are received or the ATO indicates its acceptance, they represent a contingent asset to the LDA.

Suburban Land Agency Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements For the Year Ended 30 June 2013

NOTE 41 INTEREST IN JOINTLY CONTROLLED ENTITIES

The LDA was involved in three unincorporated joint venture entities during the reporting period for the residential development of Forde, Woden East and Crace. A summary of the LDA's total interest in its Joint Ventures is detailed below.

The carrying amount of the LDA's investment in any of its Joint Ventures will differ from the carrying amount recorded in the Financial Statements of that Joint Venture due to recognition requirements detailed in AASB 131 'Interests in Joint Ventures'. Under AASB 131.48, when a venturer contributes assets to a Joint Venture, only that portion of the gain that is attributable to other venturers can be recognised. The balance of the LDA's investment in any of its Joint Ventures is recognised progressively in line with the sale of developed land by that Joint Venture to third parties.

NOTE 41 INTEREST IN JOINTLY CONTROLLED ENTITIESNOTE 41 INTEREST IN JOINTLY CONTROLLED ENTITIES

The LDA was involved in an unincorporated joint venture entity during the reporting period, for the residential development of Forde. There are two venturers in the Forde Joint Venture. The LDA and Forde Developments Pty Ltd with each party having a 50% ownership interest and voting power in the Joint Venture. The reporting date of the LDA is 30 June and the reporting date of the Joint Venture is 30 June and 31 December each year.

NOTE 41 INTEREST IN JOINTLY CONTROLLED ENTITIES

(a) The decrease in net income was due to decreased land sales for Forde as the project is nearing completion.

(b)The reduction is due to the receipt of capital distributions from the Joint Venture.

NOTE 41 INTEREST IN JOINTLY CONTROLLED ENTITIESNOTE 41 INTEREST IN JOINTLY CONTROLLED ENTITIES

Capital Commitments arising from the Joint Venture
The Joint Venture has no commitments that do not relate to inventory.

Contingent Liabilities
The Joint Venture has no contingent liabilities.

NOTE 41 INTEREST IN JOINTLY CONTROLLED ENTITIES

The LDA was involved in an unincorporated joint venture entity during the reporting period for the residential development of Woden East. There are two venturers in Woden East Joint Venture. The LDA and Woden East Pty Ltd each have a 50% ownership interest and voting power in the Joint Venture. The reporting date of the LDA and the Joint Venture is 30 June each year.

The Woden East Joint Venture was wound up on 31 December 2012 and the accounts were finalised on 30 June 2013.

NOTE 41 INTEREST IN JOINTLY CONTROLLED ENTITIES

(a) The increase in net income was due to the recognition of revenue for Sale of Development Rights per para 48 of AASB 131: Interests in Joint Ventures.

(b) The decrease in net assets is due to the wind up of the joint venture.

NOTE 41 INTEREST IN JOINTLY CONTROLLED ENTITIES

(a) This comprised cash distribution of $3,047,166 in 2012-13 and a receivable of $13,710,700 from Woden East Pty Ltd.

NOTE 41 INTEREST IN JOINTLY CONTROLLED ENTITIES

Capital Commitments arising from the Joint Venture The Joint Venture has no commitments that do not relate to inventory.

Contingent Liabilities The Joint Venture has no contingent liabilities.

NOTE 41 INTEREST IN JOINTLY CONTROLLED ENTITIES

The LDA was involved in an unincorporated joint venture entity during the reporting period for the residential development of Crace. There are two venturers in the Crace Joint Venture. The LDA and Crace Developments Pty Ltd each have a 50% ownership interest and voting power in the Joint Venture. The reporting date of the LDA is 30 June and the reporting date of Crace Joint Venture is 30 June and 31 December each year.

NOTE 41 INTEREST IN JOINTLY CONTROLLED ENTITIES

(a)The increase in net income was due to increased land sales for Crace.

(b)The reduction is due to the receipt of capital distributions from the Joint Venture.

The Carrying Amount of the Investment in the Joint Venture

NOTE 41 INTEREST IN JOINTLY CONTROLLED ENTITIESNOTE 41 INTEREST IN JOINTLY CONTROLLED ENTITIES

Capital Commitments arising from the Joint Venture
The Joint Venture has no commitments that do not relate to inventory.

Contingent Liabilities
The Joint Venture has no contingent liabilities.

Suburban Land Agency Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements For the Year Ended 30 June 2013

NOTE 42 CASH FLOW RECONCILIATION

(a) Reconciliation of Cash and Cash Equivalents at the End of the Reporting Period in the Cash Flow Statement to the Equivalent Items in the Statement of Financial Position.

NOTE 42 CASH FLOW RECONCILIATION

(b) Reconciliation of Net Cash Inflows from Operating Activities to the Operating Surplus

NOTE 42 CASH FLOW RECONCILIATION

Changes in Operating Assets and Liabilities

NOTE 42 CASH FLOW RECONCILIATION

(c) Non-Cash Financing and Investing Activities

NOTE 42 CASH FLOW RECONCILIATION

Suburban Land Agency Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements For the Year Ended 30 June 2013

NOTE 43 EVENTS OCCURRING AFTER BALANCE DATE

There were no events occurring after balance date that had a material effect on the financial statements of the LDA.

NOTE 44 RELATED PARTY DISCLOSURES

The directors of the LDA during the year were:

Mr Ross Barrett: Chair
Mr Robert Tonkin: Deputy Chair
Mr David Dawes: Chief Executive Officer and Member
Mr Ray Davis (dec): Member
Ms Sandra Lambert: Member
Ms Susan Proctor: Member

NOTE 43 EVENTS OCCURRING AFTER BALANCE DATE

The Chief Executive Officer did not receive any remuneration as a member of the Board.

NOTE 43 EVENTS OCCURRING AFTER BALANCE DATEINDEPENDENT AUDIT REPORTINDEPENDENT AUDIT REPORT

Crace Joint Venture

ABN: 62 12.4 931 161

Financial Statements for the year ended 30 June 2013

CRACE JOINT VENTURE
(ABN 62 124 931 161)

CRACE JOINT VENTURECRACE JOINT VENTURE

The above statement of comprehensive income and statement of changes in equity should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

CRACE JOINT VENTURE
(ABN 62 124 931 161)

CRACE JOINT VENTURE

The above statement of financial position should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

CRACE JOINT VENTURE
(ABN 62 124 931 161)

CRACE JOINT VENTURE

The above statement of cash flow should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

Suburban Land Agency Statement of Performance For the Year Ended 30 June 2013

Financial Performance Measurement Analysis 2012-13

Financial Performance Measurement Analysis 2012-13Financial Performance Measurement Analysis 2012-13

The above Statement of Performance should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

* These performance indicators were varied by an Instrument issued under Section 19D of the Financial Management Act 1996.
** Negative figures in brackets.

NOTES

  1. Return on Assets = (operating result before tax+interest expense) / average total assets for period
  2. Return on Equity = operating result before tax / equity
  3. Gross Profit Margin = (lease sales – cost of goods sold) / lease sales
  4. Current Ratio = current assets / current liabilities
  5. Acid Test Ratio = (current assets –current inventory) / current liabilities
  6. Cash Flow Indicator = cash flow from operating activities / current liabilities
  7. Equity Ratio = total funds employed / total assets
  8. Debt to Equity Ratio = total borrowing / total funds employed
  9. Interest Coverage = (operating result before tax + interest expense) / interest expense

Statement of Performance For the Year Ended 30 June 2013Statement of Performance For the Year Ended 30 June 2013REPORT OF FACTUAL FINDINGSREPORT OF FACTUAL FINDINGS

A8. Strategic indicators

Strategic indicators for the LDA are not reportable as they are not set as part of the Budget process and do not appear in the Budget papers.

A9. Analysis of agency performance

2012-13 Objective 1

Ensure an adequate supply of land to meet market demand and establish an inventory of serviced land

The four year Residential Indicative Land Release Program (ILRP) is intended to satisfy underlying demand of approximately 10,000 to 12,000 households as well as absorbing any unmet demand for detached housing in greenfield estates. The LDA released 4,354 dwelling sites in 2012-13.

The residential release target incorporated ‘redundancy’, which enabled the LDA to establish an inventory of serviced land to meet additional demand generated by the Government’s affordable housing initiatives, including the Land Rent Scheme.

The Commercial ILRP includes a supply of mixed use commercial land to support the demand for infill housing. The LDA released 120,479 m2 of commercial land in 2012-13. Demand for industrial land has been met (24,249 m2) and an inventory of serviced land established. The Community Facility Program delivered 122,040 m2 of community and non-urban land. The supply has enabled the LDA to support community needs arising from Canberra’s urban growth.

2012-13 Objective 2

Contribute to the delivery of the Government’s key policies and priorities relating to affordable housing, sustainability and climate change

Affordable housing

All LDA greenfield estates met the Government’s policy of delivering 20 per cent affordable housing in 2012-13. This was achieved in the Flemington Road, Wright and Coombs developments via Performance Delivery Agreements that required no less than 20 per cent of dwellings constructed to be sold at or below the affordable housing thresholds provided in the ACT Government’s Affordable Housing Action Plan.

Land rent lease

In accordance with the ACT Government’s Affordable Housing Action Plan, the LDA also provides the option for eligible purchasers of land in residential estates to take up a land rent lease. In 2012-13 a total of 318 LDA blocks were part of the Land Rent Scheme, which included releases in Franklin, Bonner, Harrison 4, Jacka, Wright and Coombs.

Housing Affordability Fund

Building on the success of the LDA’s previous Commonwealth Housing Affordability Fund agreements, the LDA continued to invest in affordable housing at Crace and Harrison. In 2012-13 the LDA received and paid $3.4 million of funding towards the delivery of affordable housing in Crace and Harrison.

The delivery of affordable housing in Harrison is in partnership with Community Housing Canberra (CHC). This is the first time the LDA has partnered with CHC.

Sustainability and climate change

The LDA has continued to incorporate the principles of ecologically sustainable development into its activities in line with government requirements and the LDA Statement of Intent (SOI).

Consistent with the LDA’s Sustainability and Innovation Framework and the ACT Government’s The Canberra Plan — Towards Our Second Century, the LDA collects comprehensive data for reporting on across eight key themes:

  • energy and emissions;
  • water;
  • landscape and biodiversity;
  • waste and materials;
  • influencing design;
  • community;
  • transport; and
  • affordability.

The reporting process provides a measure of the wide range of sustainability initiatives undertaken by the LDA such as:

  • encouraging energy efficiency by mandating solar hot water heaters in Harrison 4 and Coombs;
  • continuing the trial of energy efficient street lighting in Bonner and Harrison 4 and further expanding the trial to the suburb of Jacka;
  • developing water sensitive urban design in all LDA estates;
  • identifying and protecting threatened species, populations and ecological communities;
  • continuing to sponsor PhD scholarships at the Australian National University’s Fenner School of Environment and Society;
  • requiring all LDA projects to be presented to the LDA Design Review Panel (DRP) prior to the LDA Board’s approval of the Project Business Plan (in 2012-13 LDA projects reviewed by the DRP included: the Molonglo Demonstration Precinct — Scope at Coombs; Belconnen Section 47; Throsby; Amaroo Group Centre; Campbell Section 5; and Greenway Lakeside);
  • helping establish new community wellbeing through the Mingle Community Development Program;
  • ensuring pedestrian and cycle networks are provided in all LDA estates; and
  • providing affordable housing through the LDA’s OwnPlace program, Project Delivery Agreement and the Land Rent Scheme.

A number of the LDA’s other achievements integrate different aspects of sustainability. A licence agreement has been signed with NSW Landcom for the use of PrecinX, a mathematical tool that calculates sustainability performance of estates. PrecinX has been adapted for ACT conditions and is being trialled in a number of LDA projects.

Wright and Coombs were re-accredited through the Urban Development Institute of Australia EnviroDevelopment industry certification scheme under the energy, waste, community and ecosystems categories. A number of initiatives contributed, including the Home Sustainability Advisor, solar orientation of blocks, solar envelope guidelines (ensuring solar access for standard homes) and mandatory seven star energy efficiency rating for multi-unit developments.

The LDA has been a sponsor of the Green Star Communities rating tool being developed by the Green Building Council of Australia. This is a national scheme to assess the sustainability of community-level projects and the LDA is piloting the tool in Lawson.

The LDA is working on a demonstration precinct that has been designed to provide an exemplar sustainable living community. Scope at Coombs is an initiative seeking to showcase sustainable living and design excellence. The development is comprised of 56 compact houses and 20 multi-unit dwellings within the Molonglo Valley suburb of Coombs. Scope at Coombs is 1.6 hectares and comprises five urban courts designed to provide space and facilities that complement quality compact living.

The LDA, in partnership with the Master Builders Association of the ACT, delivered the Franklin Charity House which has a seven star thermal rating and adaptable features. The house was auctioned in March 2013 with proceeds raised being distributed to a number of local charities that support those experiencing homelessness or at risk of becoming homeless.

2012-13 Objective 3

Improve inter-directorate coordination to facilitate efficient land delivery processes across the residential, commercial, industrial and community sectors

The LDA worked closely with the Economic Development Directorate (EDD) and relevant directorates to provide technical input to several inter-directorate working groups and committees that assist in coordinating land delivery. These include: the Infrastructure and Capital Works Working Group to improve the integration of design management and delivery of capital works that relate to estate works; the Pipeline Constraints and Supply Working Group to identify and resolve blockages and constraints to timely land release; the Demand Analysis and Monitoring Working Group; the DRP with the Government Architect and members from Environment and Sustainable Development Directorate who advise on urban design; and the Land Supply Committee.

The LDA also provided detailed technical advice to assist in resolving land development issues with the Commonwealth, especially in relation to obtaining environmental clearances under the Commonwealth’s Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999.

2012-13 Objective 4

Operate efficiently in a commercial market and provide agreed returns to the Territory on its investment in the agency

As at 30 June 2013, the LDA had received land sales revenue totalling $263 million in the period since 1 July 2012. As at that time, the value of exchanged contracts held by the LDA was $152.5 million (excluding GST). Of these, $133.3 million were scheduled to settle in 2012-13.

2012-13 Objective 5

Ensure that key commercial decisions on land in the ACT are made with due consideration to the sustainability of the Territory (that is, by balancing economic, social and environmental factors)

Each project that the LDA undertakes requires development of of a detailed Project Business Plan which is approved by the LDA Board. Plans are also independently reviewed by the DRP and identify a range of non-financial outcomes. This approach ensures that the right balance between economic, social and environmental factors are embedded within projects.

2012-13 Objective 6

Improve community engagement processes for high profile redevelopments

Community engagement is coordinated by EDD on behalf of the LDA, in accordance with the existing Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) between the two entities. With particular regard to community engagement on high profile redevelopments, this arrangement has enabled a holistic approach to each engagement, providing members of industry associations, professional groups, Community Councils and the community with an established contact point.

This has ensured fast and effective responses to all comments and suggestions received and all community engagement reports are reviewed by the Minister for Economic Development prior to publication.

This engagement model has delivered high level consultation outcomes for the community, stakeholders and the Government.

2012-13 Objective 7

Support the efficiency and effectiveness of the EDD portfolio through effective working relationships and contribution to policy development

Under the existing MoU arrangements between the EDD and the LDA, EDD undertakes a number of administrative functions on behalf of the LDA, including policy development. Notwithstanding, the LDA actively contributes to policy development through the provision of detailed technical advice relating primarily to land development, through a number of workshops and meetings with the broader EDD portfolio, and by ensuring a regular and consistent flow of information for effective land policy development.

Further information may be obtained from:

Senior Business Manager
Telephone: (02) 6207 8263

A10. Triple bottom line

INDICATOR

2011-12 result

2012-13 result

% change

ECONOMIC

Employee expenses

Number of staff employed (head count)

90

94

4% higher

Total employee expenditure ($)

10,369

11,066

7% higher

Operating statement

   

Total expenditure ($)

279,753

167,391

40% lower

Total own source revenue ($)

445,531

282,771

36% lower

Total net cost of services

N/A

N/A

N/A

Economic viability

   

Total assets ($)

401,703

402,924

N/A

*In 2011-12, central services consumption (percentage of total base building consumption as provided by Territory and Municipal Services Directorate) was included in the LDAs office consumption data. In 2012-13, Territory and Municipal Services Directorate were not able to provide central services data (including electricity, water and gas). Data for 2011-12 has therefore been recalculated (shown in brackets in green) to show office energy use without central services consumption to allow for comparison between the years. See div C19 for further information.

Further information may be obtained from:

Senior Business Manager
Telephone: (02) 6207 8263

B1. Community engagement

The LDA Mingle Mascot

The Suburban Land Agency approach to community engagement is based on the ACT Government Guideline, Engaging Canberrans: A Guide to Community Engagement, which is published on the Chief Minister and Treasury Directorate (CMTD) website. Community engagement is a function delivered on behalf of the LDA by the Economic Development Directorate (EDD) through a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU).

The LDA continues to implement the community development program called Mingle, which is designed to build vibrant local communities within new LDA estates. The program aims to achieve a number of social objectives based around the notion of encouraging new residents to feel part of the community and become involved in community life and activities. The program is tailored for each suburb to suit demographics, resident feedback and proximity to surrounding services. LDA works closely with the Community Services Directorate, who also participate in Mingle events.

The LDA undertook research with residents in Bonner and Franklin to test the effectiveness of the Mingle program. A total of 470 survey forms were received — with 227 residents of Bonner and 243 residents of Franklin participating in the survey. Residents expressed an overall high level of satisfaction with living at Bonner and Franklin. In Bonner, 87 per cent of respondents agreed or strongly agreed that ‘Overall, Bonner is a good place to live’. This compares with 89 per cent of respondents living in Franklin. More than half of all survey respondents in Franklin had participated in a Mingle event or activity.

In 2012-13 the program continued in Franklin and Bonner with promotion of future activities commencing for purchasers in Wright and Coombs. Over 15 community events were organised in 2012-13 across Franklin and Bonner supported by quarterly newsletters and online communication pieces. Events included a Community Festival, Pet Play Dates, GardenSmart activities, Gubur Dhaura walking tours, photography lessons, Twilight Movie Night and Christmas Lights competitions. A volunteer group was also established in Franklin and Bonner to support greater community involvement.

The LDA, in partnership with the Master Builders Association of the ACT, delivered the Franklin Charity House Project in 2012-13. A variety of community events were conducted at the House as part of the Franklin Mingle program. The net proceeds of the sale of the House (over $582,000) were distributed between five charities who provide support to those who are either homeless or are at risk of being homeless — namely, YWCA of Canberra, YouthCARE Canberra, Canberra Men’s Centre, Inanna and Toora Women Incorporated. The Franklin Charity House project involved the generous support and contributions from over 100 businesses within the ACT building and construction industry.

In May 2013 the LDA hosted events including the Canberra International Music Festival Twilight event at Kingston Foreshore. This event fostered community development for Kingston Foreshore residents as well as being strongly supported by the wider Canberra Community. More than 2,500 people attended the event throughout the evening. It is planned to be included again in the schedule of events for 2013-14.

Canberra International Music Festival Twilight Event 2013

Canberra International Music Festival Twilight Event 2013

Community engagement

The following table outlines the community engagement projects undertaken during 2012-13.

ProjectConsultation process (tools used)Groups/ individuals consultedApproximate number consulted and number of timesOutcome
Greenway
Lakeside
Public dropin
sessions at
Tuggeranong
Hyperdome; library
display;
Tuggeranong
Community Council
meetings; LDA
website; Canberra
Times Community
Noticeboard
Tuggeranong
Community
Council; local
residents; patrons
and employees
of Tuggeranong
Hyperdome; local
businesses and
stakeholders
500 consulted
Information Session
at Tuggeranong
Hyperdome (March
2013)
Project display
at Tuggeranong
Library (March/April
2013)
Community advised
on the final design
of the Estate
Development Plan
for Greenway
Lakeside West,
following two
years of previous
consultation
Belconnen
Section 48
Block 15
Belconnen
Community Council
meetings; LDA
website; site sign
Belconnen
Community
Council; patrons of
car park
40 consulted (April
2012 meeting)
One-on-one
consultation
session with
a member of
the Belconnen
Community Council
(December 2012
Community was
advised of the
pending release of
the site
Belconnen
Section 152
Block 17
Belconnen
Community
Council meetings;
stakeholder
meeting with
Belconnen
Community
Service; LDA
website; site sign;
LDA website
Belconnen
Community
Council; Belconnen
Community
Service; patrons
of existing car
park; adjoining
businesses
40 consulted (April
2012 meeting)
One-on-one
consultation
session with
a member of
the Belconnen
Community Council
(December 2012)
Community was
advised of the
pending release
of the site.
programmed for
release 2013-14
Campbell Section 5Newsletter to residents and local
businesses; LDA
website; Canberra
Times Community
Noticeboard
National Capital Authority; Campbell Residents Representatives; local residents of Campbell, Reid and Duntroon; business owners

2,415 newsletters to residents and local businesses

One (1) session held with Residents Representatives

Community advised of the status of the NCA Works Approval and the EPBC approval, as well as the programmed development timeframes
MolongloHome Sustainability
Advice Sessions for
community groups;
information session
for Molonglo River
Park — Coombs
Interface project;
Wright and
Coombs project
newsletters; ten
year anniversary of
Canberra fires; LDA
information display Board at Stromolo
Purchasers in
Wright and
Coombs; residents
of Wright; future
residents of
Coombs; Weston
Creek Community
Council; ACT
Equestrian
Association Forum
Attended monthly
meetings of the
ACT Equestrian
Association Forum
Information on
Wright and Coombs
specific building
requirements
communicated to
purchasers; update
on Wright and
Coombs project
to Weston Creek
and surrounding
community; update
on Wright and
Coombs project
to Wright current
residents and
Wright and Coombs
future residents;
update Equestrian
Association on
development of
Molonglo Valley
Molonglo ValleyNewsletterMolonglo Valley database, which includes stakeholders and purchasers from Wright and Coombs

9,700 in October 2012, February 2013 and May 2013

Update on the
construction of
Wright and Coombs;
details of how to
register to be on the
Mingle database;
tips from the Home
Sustainability
Advisor; information
about community
events; information
for purchasers
about block and
street maintenance;
notification of land
releases and sales
results
Kingston
Foreshore
LDA website; ACT
Government Time
to Talk Canberra
website; Kingston
Foreshore Facebook
page; Shoreline
newsletter;
stakeholder
meetings; Canberra
International Music
Festival ‘Twilight’
event with public
information drop-in
session and display;
letter box drops
Kingston Foreshore
residents; Kingston
Foreshore
residents’ groups;
Kingston Foreshore
body corporates;
Kingston Foreshore
developers;
business
owners; key arts
organisations
Approximately 466
likes on Facebook
(as at August 2013);
total of 1,086
newsletters sent to
local residents and
businesses; three
(3) stakeholder
meetings held with
25 stakeholders;
approximately
2,500 people
attended free public
event; letters sent to
400 residents
Kingston Foreshore
Harbour and
Landscaping
opened by
the Minister
for Economic
Development
Andrew Barr;
park naming
competition;
free public
event; regular
communication
with key
stakeholders.
MoncrieffPublic drop in session at Amaroo School; LDA websiteLocal residents

LEss than ten people consulted

One session held on 11 October 2012

Community advised of the Environmental Impact Statement

 

Further information may be obtained from:

Senior Business Manager
Telephone: (02) 6207 8263

B2. Internal and external scrutiny

The LDA Board and senior management ensure the accountability of program delivery through a strong governance approach. This approach is maintained through regular monitoring and scrutiny of key activities by the LDA Board, the LDA Board Audit Committee and the LDA Executive.

Internal policies and procedures are regularly reviewed to ensure they are current and reflect the business structure and objectives of the LDA.

The LDA has not had any scrutiny report developed or tabled by the ACT Ombudsman.

The internal audit is reported separately in div C1 (risk management and internal audit).

Further information may be obtained from:

Senior Business Manager
Telephone: (02) 6207 8263

B3. Legislative Assembly Committee Inquiries and Reports

The LDA formally responded with the EDD to the Standing Committee on Public Accounts (PAC) Inquiry on the performance audit undertaken by the ACT Auditor-General on Residential Land Supply. The PAC finalised the review on 22 August 2012.

LDA Executive attended the following Committee hearings.

  • Annual Report Hearings.
  • Select Committee on Estimates.
  • Aboriginal Torres Strait Islander Elected Body.

Further information may be obtained from:

Senior Business Manager
Telephone: (02) 6207 8263

B4 Legislation report

While the LDA does not administer any enactments, it is established by div 31 of the Planning and Development Act 2007 and is bound by chapter 4 of that Act.

Further information may be obtained from:

Senior Business Manager
Telephone: (02) 6207 8263

C1. Risk management and internal audit

Risk management

Risk management in the LDA is monitored and regularly reviewed by the LDA Board and Land Executive Committee, and through regular Project Control Group meetings and monthly reports to the Executive and the LDA Board, with recommendations provided by the LDA Board Audit Committee and ACT Auditor-General’s Office as appropriate. The LDA Executive is committed to, and places a high priority on, effective risk management across the full range of organisational functions. The overarching approach to managing risk at strategic and operational levels includes incorporating appropriate fraud prevention and control processes and practices to ensure the early identification and treatment of emerging risks.

LDA planning processes, including strategic and business planning together with organisational project management, incorporate risk management.

The LDA’s approach to risk management is based on the relevant Standard (AS/NZS ISO 31000:2009: Risk Management — Principles and Guidelines). The LDA’s Risk Register was developed in accordance with the Standard to include organisational risks, sources, impacts, responsibilities, treatments and monitoring/review processes.

The LDA contributed to a series of meetings in 2012-13 to assist with the identification of significant risks and to determine appropriate mitigation strategies. The results were incorporated into the LDA Risk Register and approved by the LDA Board Audit Committee in May 2013. The identified risks are reviewed regularly by the Land Executive and the LDA Board Audit Committee to ensure risk mitigation strategies are included in business plans and are regularly reported against.

The LDA has also implemented strategies to meet obligations under theWork Health and Safety Act 2011(the WHS Act) and the Public Sector Management Act 1994. A Work Health and Safety Strategic Plan (the Plan) has been developed in consultation with the LDA Board, the Economic Development Directorate (EDD) Senior Executive Committee and health and safety representatives from across both the LDA and the EDD.

The Plan outlines the LDA’s commitment to the provision of a safe and healthy work environment for all workers, visitors and clients, and assists the LDA in meeting the WHS Act obligations where there are requirements for employers to provide and maintain a safe workplace. Monitoring of WHS issues at all stages of construction projects is undertaken and any issues or incidents are reviewed monthly by the LDA Board to ensure strategies are in place to address identified emerging safety risks or trends. Further, the LDA and EDD have led the way in WHS risk management by developing and implementing the Interim Guidelines for Managing Work Health and Safety in Construction Projects. These guidelines will be adopted at a whole-of-government level later in 2013.

LDA Board Audit Committee

The LDA Board Audit Committee and internal auditors provide independent assurance and assistance to the LDA Board on risk management, financial controls and legal compliance as well as external accountability responsibilities.

The LDA Internal Audit Charter provides the framework for the conduct of the internal audit function in the LDA. Annual and forward audit programs are guided by governance, risk and compliance programs and supported by an audit recommendations register.

The LDA Board Audit Committee met six times during 2012-13.

Name of member

Position

Duration

Meetings attended

   

(of the total of 6)

Robert Tonkin

Chair

2012-13

6

Sandra Lambert

Member

2012-13

6

Senior Executive Responsible for Business Integrity and Risk

The Director Workforce and Governance, EDD, undertakes the role as the LDA’s Senior Executive Responsible for Business Integrity and Risk.

Further information may be obtained from:

Senior Business Manager
Telephone: (02) 6207 8263

C2. Fraud prevention

The LDA is fully committed to the detection and elimination of fraud and corruption and has in place a Fraud and Corruption Control Plan and a Fraud Risk Register, approved in March 2013 by the LDA Board Audit Committee reporting to the LDA Board.

The main objective of the LDA Fraud and Corruption Control Plan 2012–14is to prevent, to the greatest extent possible, all incidents of fraud and corruption towards the LDA. The Plan provides the basis of the LDA’s actions to control fraud, to identify those key activities that require the implementation of additional controls to reduce the likelihood of fraud occurring, and to assist staff in the management of fraud risks. Additionally, the Chief Executive Financial Instruction No 9 (Managing Risk and Accountability), details the primary responsibilities and accountabilities in relation to fraud, integrity and related reporting.

The LDA Fraud and Corruption Control Plan 2012–14was developed taking into account the recommendations from a PricewaterhouseCoopers audit report. A Land Development Division workshop was held to identify risks and treatments, including fraud and corruption risks specific to the Division. The LDA’s Fraud Risk Register is to be regularly monitored, updated as relevant by Executives and business units, and endorsed by the LDA board Audit Committee and the LDA Board.

In accordance with the governance arrangements in place under the Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) between the Economic Development Directorate (EDD) and the LDA, fraud and ethics training opportunities are available to staff through the training and development program. An ethics and fraud awareness training session was delivered in May 2013. Fraud and corruption prevention and awareness is also delivered as a component of the quarterly EDD Induction Program, along with presentations on the ACT Public Service (ACTPS) Code of Conduct, values and signature behaviours. A training session for managers on ‘Dealing with Misconduct and Inappropriate Behaviour in the Workplace’ was delivered in July 2012 and is available through the ACTPS training calendar.

The LDA has a strong culture of probity and adherence to public sector management values. The Land Executive Committee reviews LDA’s fraud risks on a monthly basis and members demonstrate, promote, instil and foster high standards of professionalism, integrity and work ethics in all staff. In the second half of 2012-13 the CEO reminded all staff of their collective responsibilities to act ethically and with integrity in the work of the LDA.

The ‘Purchase of Land from LDA Joint Venture and LDA Estates Policy and Fast Facts’, which was extended in 2011-12 to include all EDD staff, is available via the EDD intranet. This outlines expectations for staff, or members of their immediate family, taking part in purchases of land from the LDA to ensure there is no actual or perceived conflict of interest in the process. An October 2012 CEO’s message to staff, and discussion at the EDD Senior Manager’s Forum in June 2013, reminded staff of this policy.

Senior Executive Responsible for Business Integrity Risk

The Director, Workforce and Governance, EDD, is the LDA’s Senior Executive Responsible for Business Integrity Risk (SERBIR) and manages information pertaining to actual, alleged or suspected cases of fraud. The LDA Board and LDA Board Audit Committee receive regular reports from the SERBIR.

Two incidents of suspected fraud, relating to petty cash handling and making a false statutory declaration, were reported. During 2012-13, the investigations were completed. As a result of the investigations, petty cash access and reconciliation processes have been reviewed and, in relation to the false statutory declaration, the staff member concerned has had a financial penalty imposed on their salary and has been transferred to a another position.

Further information may be obtained from:

Director, Workforce and Governance
Telephone: (02) 6205 9626

C3. Public interest disclosure

PID procedures

Under the Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) between the LDA and the Economic Development Directorate (EDD), the EDD provides governance services to the LDA. The services provided include developing and implementing policy in relation to public interest disclosures (PIDs).

During the 2012-13 reporting year, two different pieces of legislation were in place in relation to PIDs, also known as ‘whistle-blowing’. The Public Interest Disclosure Act 1994 provided a vehicle for any members of the public, including ACT public servants, to report wrongdoing in the ACT public sector, and provided rights and protection to persons who reported wrongdoing. Under that piece of legislation, in early September 2012 the EDD prepared a guidance document setting out the procedures that it and the LDA would use to receive, investigate and manage a PID. This document was placed on the EDD website and promulgated to all LDA and EDD staff via email.

The new Public Interest Disclosure Act 2012 (the Act) commenced on 1 February 2013 and improves on the previous legislation by: broadening and clarifying the types of wrongdoing that fall within the definition of disclosable conduct; establishing a clear reporting pathway for the receipt and handling of disclosures; and providing specific circumstances under which a disclosure can be made to a third party.

As required under the Act, the Commissioner for Public Administration’s office prepared Public Interest Disclosure Guidelines 2013to assist ACT Public Sector entities to meet their obligations under the new legislation. The guidelines are a notifiable instrument (NI2013-40), which came into effect on 7 June 2013.

The Act also requires the LDA to publish specific procedures detailing how PIDs will be managed. The procedures must detail how LDA will meet the obligations to protect disclosers and how the agency will assess and manage the risk of reprisals against people who make a PID, or are involved or implicated in a PID. The procedures must align with the Commissioner for Public Administration’s guidelines. Under the MoU, the LDA will adopt EDD’s procedures, which are currently being finalised.

PID statistics

The LDA did not receive any public interest disclosures during 2012-13.

Further information may be obtained from:

Director, Workforce and Governance
Telephone: (02) 6205 9626

C4. Freedom of information

The Freedom of Information Act 1989(FOI Act):

  • provides for general access to documents of agencies and official documents of Ministers, subject to certain exemptions;
  • provides for the amendment of records about personal affairs of an applicant that the applicant believes to be incorrect, incomplete, out of date or misleading;
  • establishes a system to review certain decisions at various levels; and
  • requires the publication of information on the functions and official documents of an agency, and that particular documents be available for inspection and sale.

Section 7 statement

Section 7 of the FOI Act requires the LDA to prepare and publish a statement outlining the organisation’s functions and powers, the categories of documents available and facilities provided for access to documents.

Organisation function and powers

The LDA is a Territory authority established by div 31 of the Planning and Development Act 2007to develop land, carry out works to enhance land, and carry out strategic or complex urban development projects. The LDA does not administer any legislation.

A MoU between the LDA and the EDD outlines a provision of governance arrangements provided by the EDD. This includes the functions of an FOI Coordinator.

Public participation in decision making

Public participation in decision making includes public submissions to inquiries, discussion at public meetings, consultative committees for specific purposes, access to records through FOI requests, comments on draft documents, comments on Bills before the Assembly and contact with the relevant Minister.

Categories of documents

The LDA holds the following categories of documents:

  • those that are freely available on request and without charge;
  • those that are exempt under the FOI Act; and
  • all other kinds of documents that may be made available under the FOI Act.

Documents available on request and without change

Documents within this category include publications by the LDA on various aspects of its activities. These documents are usually distributed at events, from the offices of the EDD, and are generally available on the LDA’s website. Other documents include discussion papers, information pamphlets and annual reports.

Documents available under the FOI Act

Documents of other kinds that may be available under the FOI Act include:

  • general records, including internal, interdepartmental and public documents such as minutes of meetings, agendas and background papers, policy statements, correspondence and administrative records;
  • personnel records;
  • records held on microfilm, computer or paper in connection with directorate functions;
  • photographs, videos and film;
  • maps, plans and brochures;
  • technical and scientific reports and discussion papers;
  • financial records;
  • details of contracts and tenders;
  • files on applicants and clients; and
  • leases and deeds of agreement.

Facilities for access

In line with the MoU between the EDD and the LDA, responsibility for the coordination of FOI requests lies with EDD. Those seeking information are encouraged to first contact the EDD before using the more formal FOI process.

The EDD’s contact for FOI is:

The FOI Coordinator
Economic Development Directorate
GPO Box 158
Canberra ACT 2601

The physical location of the FOI Coordinator is:

Level 2, Telstra House
490 Northbourne Avenue
Dickson ACT 2602
Telephone: (02) 6207 5833
Email: EDDFreedomofInformation@act.gov.au

Several bus stops are close to Telstra House and short term parking is located off Challis Street, Dickson, including disabled car park spaces. The building has wheelchair and elevator access.

Section 8 statement

Section 8 of the FOI Act requires the principal officer to prepare and make available each year a statement listing all publicly accessible documents that are used by the LDA in making decisions under a legislative scheme. A copy of the div 8 statement is available online at www.economicdevelopment.act.gov.au.

FOI guidelines

The ‘FOI Guidelines for Applicants’ are available on the LDA website to assist prospective applicants to make an FOI request. EDD has also prepared internal ‘Guidelines for Managers and Staff’, utilised by officers of the LDA to inform decision makers and action officers about the FOI Act and their roles and responsibilities in managing responses to applications in accordance with the FOI Act.

Section 79 statement

Section 79 of the FOI Act requires the LDA to include in its annual report details of applications made to the LDA during the year. Access decisions in relation to FOI requests are categorised in terms of: full access granted; partial access granted; entirely exempt; access refused to all documents (technical refusal); decision still pending; transferred; and withdrawn.

During the 2012-13 financial year the LDA received five applications under the FOI Act for access to documents

Number of FOI requests received

30 days or less

31 to 45 days

46 to 60 days

61 to 90 days

91 days or more

Not yet finalised (as at 30

June 2013)

5

5

0

0

0

0

0

Access decisions

Full access

Partial access

Entirely exempt

Technical refusal

Withdrawn

Transferred to another Directorate

Not yet provided

0

2

11

12

1

0

0

Requests to amend personal records (div 48)

Section 48 of the FOI Act provides for a person, under specified circumstances, to ask for personal information in the documents to be amended if he or she believes they are incomplete, incorrect, out of date, or misleading — providing the person establishes one of these grounds.

Decisions appealed
Request for Internal ReviewDecision AffirmedPartial accessOverturned
0000
Referrals to the ACT Civil and Administrative Tribunal (ACAT)
Request to ACATAffirmedOverturnedNot yet finished
0000
Fees and charge (for request with > 10 hours processing time)
Fees chargedTotal amount collected
$0$0
Apllicant type
Member of publicSolicitorAssociation/organisationMLACompany
21200

Requests to amend personal records (section 48)

Section 48 of the FOI Act provides for a person, under specified circumstances, to ask for personal information in the documents to be amended if he or she believes they are incomplete, incorrect, out of date, or misleading — providing the person establishes one of these grounds

RequestAffirmedOverturnedOngoing
0000

Further information may be obtained from:

Director, Workforce and Governance
Telephone: (02) 6205 9626

C5. Internal accountability

LDA Board

The LDA Board is established by div 42 of the Planning and Development Act 2007 as a governing board. The LDA Board must have at least five, but not more than eight, members. In appointing LDA Board members, the responsible Minister must try to ensure that the following disciplines and areas of expertise are represented:

  • land development
  • landscape architecture
  • sustainable development
  • economics
  • public law
  • finance or accounting
  • public administration
  • engineering

Under div 56 of the Financial Management Act 1996the LDA Board is responsible, under the Minister, for the efficient and effective financial management of the authority. Section 77 of the Financial Management Act 1996 provides that a governing board has the following functions;

  • setting the authority’s policies and strategies;
  • governing the authority consistently with the authority’s establishing Act and other relevant legislation;
  • ensuring, as far as practicable, that the authority operates in a proper, effective and efficient way; and
  • ensuring, as far as practicable, that the authority complies with applicable governmental policies.

From July 2012 to December 2012 the LDA Board consisted of six members. There were a total of 13 meetings during 2012-13.

Board attendance 2012-13

NamePositionMeeting attended of total of 13
Ross BarrettChair12*
Robert TonkinDeputy Chair13
Susan ProctorMember12*
Sandra LambertMember13
Ray Davis (deceased)Member5
David DawesCEO & Member12*

*Apologies recorded.

Ross Barrett

Ross Barrett

Mr Ross Barrett is former President of the ACT Branch of the Master Builders Association (MBA). He is a life member of the Association. Mr Barrett has been a Fellow of the Institution of Engineers Australia since 1986 and, in 2011, was judged by Engineers Australia as one of Australia’s top 100 most influential engineers.

Mr Barrett has a long history of membership and leadership of professional bodies. He has been a Fellow of the Australian Institute of Company Directors since 1990. He has been a National Board member of the MBA since 2001. He is also a National Board member (since 1995) and current President of the Civil Contractors Federation of Australia (CCF), which is the national body of the state and territory CCFs and is Australia’s pre­eminent civil contractor organisation with over 2000 full contractor members. He is also a current Board member of MBA Group Training (ACT) Inc.

Mr Barrett has served on a number of regional advisory and professional organisations. He was Chair of Community Housing Canberra Ltd (2007–11) and Chair of Regional Development Australia ACT in 2009-10. Both of these positions are ACT Government appointments. He has also been a member of the Residential Advisory Committee to the ACT Planning and Land Authority since 2003 and its predecessor organisation, the Residential Advisory Group to Chief Minister’s Department, from 1998.

Mr Barrett has also held the following regional positions.

  • Chair (2007-08) and Deputy Chair (2008-09), Capital Region Development Board.
  • Patron, ACT Region, Worldskills 2007-08.
  • Deputy Chair, Australian Technical College Queanbeyan and Region Steering Committee, 2006–08.
  • Member of Executive, Queanbeyan Business Council, 2005–08.
  • Treasurer, CCF, 2005–07.
  • Member, Canberra Central Task Force, 2005–07.
  • Board Member, Business Canberra, 2003–05.
  • Board Member, Australian Construction Industry Forum Ltd, 2003–05.

The Canberra Central Task Force was established by the ACT Government to oversee delivery of the Canberra Central Program and consisted of the chief executive from each ACT Government department, together with industry representatives.

Business Canberra was established by the ACT Government to provide strategic advice to government on a broad range of business related issues.

Mr Barrett has a Bachelor of Engineering (Civil) degree from the University of NSW and a Local Government Engineers Certificate (NSW).

Robert Tonkin

Mr Robert Tonkin is a former senior Commonwealth and ACT public servant and has been a resident of Canberra since 1973. Robert is a former Chief Executive of the ACT Chief Minister’s Department, Associate Secretary in the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet, and Deputy Secretary in the Department of Defence.

Mr Tonkin has extensive high-level experience in public sector governance, strategic policy and resource management, and national security and risk management.

Within the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet, Mr Tonkin led the Australian Government’s Taskforce on Offshore Maritime Security and headed the Secretariat of the COAG National Enquiry on Bushfire Mitigation and Management. In the ACT he led reform initiatives in the ACT Public Service, led the Service’s response to the 2003 bushfires and served on the Bushfire Recovery Taskforce.

As a Deputy Secretary in the Department of Defence, Mr Tonkin was concurrently CFO and CIO, oversighted a number of divisions including corporate planning, government relations, estate management, corporate support and audit, and led the Department’s successful implementation of major reform and efficiency initiatives.

Mr Tonkin has chaired a number of Commonwealth department audit committees and has been a board member of the Defence Housing Authority.

He was previously a member of the Council of the Order of Australia and of the Australian Bravery Decorations Council, and was Deputy Chair of the Defence Reserves Support Council of the ACT.

Currently, Mr Tonkin is the National Secretary and ACT Chair of the Australian Industry and Defence Network.

Mr Tonkin has an Honours degree in urban geography and is a Fellow of the Australian Institute of Management.

Susan Proctor

Ms Susan Proctor is a Legal Director of Commercial/Property at Bradley Allen Love, the amalgamated firm of Bradley Allen Lawyers (of which she was the Managing Partner) and Williams Love & Nicol Lawyers, both local Canberra law firms. She has been practising in all aspects of property law and commercial law for the past 15 years. Her client base consists largely of Canberra based businesses, property owners/developers, clubs and listed companies involved in commercial property development.

Ms Proctor is a former director and Chair of the Audit Committee of ACTTAB. She was also a Councillor of the ACT Property Council and member of the Council’s Planning Committee. Ms Proctor was also a Director of Tuggeranong Valley Financial Services (Bendigo Bank).

Ms Proctor has a Bachelor of Laws Degree from the Australian National University, as a Bachelor of Arts Degree and a Graduate Diploma in Legal Practice. Ms Proctor is a member of the Law Society and the Australian Institute of Company Directors.

Sandra Lambert

Ms Sandra Lambert has worked for the public sector for all of her career spanning over 30 years. She has worked as a teacher and held a number of school based leadership positions including as a College Principal. She has also worked for the Australian Government and has held several senior executive and leadership positions in the ACT Government. Her most recent was as the inaugural Chief Executive of the then Department of Disability, Housing and Community Services (2002–10), a position in which she exercised the statutory role of the Commissioner for Housing, responsible for the public trading enterprise known as Housing ACT.

During this period, in 2009, she also undertook the role of ACT Coordinator General of the Stimulus Taskforce responsible for delivering the Australian Government’s National Building Package in the ACT. As Chief Executive, Ms Lambert was also actively engaged in national committees including chairing the Community, Disability Services Ministers’ Advisory Committee for three years. She was also a Board Member of the Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute and of the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare. Before becoming a Chief Executive, Ms Lambert’s roles included driving and implementing whole-of-government policy development, implementation and evaluation, and being responsible for leading significant, often high profile projects. Leading the project team that established Canberra Connect is one example.

Ms Lambert has a Bachelor of Arts degree from Canterbury University (New Zealand) and a Diploma of Teaching, Distinction Award. She is a Fellow of the Australian Institute of Management and a member of the Australian Institute of Company Directors.

Ms Lambert’s current activities include consulting roles and being a non-executive director on other Boards. She is also the Deputy Chair of the Hands Across Canberra Board, which is a new philanthropic organisation in the ACT.

Ray L Davis (deceased)

The late Ray Davis was one of Canberra’s most experienced and well known property identities. He built up an unparalleled healthy respect from property owners, investors, financiers and managers over some 30 years of consultancy, agency practice, valuations and property management in the ACT and the local region in all facets including residential, rural, commercial, industrial and retail.

Ray passed away on 19 December 2012.

‘...He was a true gentleman, a man of good humour, great style and “sartorial flair”. He will be greatly missed.’ (LDA Board of the late Ray Davis, February 2013).

David Dawes

Mr David Dawes has three important roles in the ACTPS: Director-General of the Economic Development Directorate (EDD), CEO of the LDA and Coordinator-General.

As Director-General of EDD, Mr Dawes is responsible for:

  • programs, initiatives and policy advice aimed at supporting economic and business development in the Territory;
  • preparation and delivery of the Government’s land release program, including the delivery of a diverse range of capital projects;
  • managing the Government’s tourism marketing and development programs, along with managing the Territory’s major sporting and recreation venues and events; and
  • leading the Government’s sport and recreation programs and policies.

As the Chief Executive Officer of the LDA, Mr Dawes is responsible for the development and release of government-owned land for residential, community, commercial and industrial uses.

In his role of Coordinator-General, Mr Dawes is responsible for:

  • coordinating government response to high value and/or high complexity investment or development inquiries and proposals from the private sector;
  • advising government on systemic changes to policy/practice to improve the delivery of government priorities and on reduction in ‘red tape’ to improve business and investment in the ACT and the effectiveness of the ACTPS; and
  • undertaking cross-government coordination of complex delivery activities as requested by the Minister or Strategic Board.

Mr Dawes has led EDD since it was established in May 2011. Prior to that, he was Chief Executive of the ACT Government’s Department of Land and Property Services (created in December 2009) responsible for implementing major government initiatives such as the land release program and aspects of the nationally recognised Affordable Housing Action Plan.

During this time, Mr Dawes also oversaw the ACT Property Group, responsible for managing and preparing long-term plans for housing ACT public servants. In addition, he led the Strategic Project Facilitation Group, which facilitated numerous private sector and government projects including development of the National Arboretum Canberra.

Mr Dawes joined the ACTPS in April 2007 as Deputy Chief Executive, Business and Projects, Chief Minister’s Department.

Prior to joining the ACTPS he was the Executive Director of the MBA (ACT) for nine years. In that role he represented the Association with industry, government and business groups including the Canberra Business Council, local area planning and advisory committees and was a member of the Occupational Health and Safety Council.

During his time at the MBA, he was a founding member of OzHelp — an organisation that has now been launched nationally to prevent youth suicide. He commenced the ‘Housing for Life’ advisory service in the ACT and built the first ‘Housing for Life’ display house in conjunction with ACT Housing. In 2003 he instigated a single demolition package to assist the victims of the bushfires and was the Chairman on the Planning and Infrastructure Task Force and the Community Expert Reference Group, which was established following the 2003 bushfires.

Remuneration for Chief Executive Officer and the LDA Board Members

Under the Remuneration Tribunal Act 1995the Remuneration Tribunal determines remuneration for the CEO and Board Members.

Senior Executives

NamePosition
David DawesChief Executive Officer, Suburban Land Agency Director-General, Economic Development Directorate Coordinator-General
Dan StewartDeputy Director-General, Land Development, Strategy and Finance
Chris ReynoldsExecutive Director, Land Development

 

Management committees

Senior Executive Committee

The Senior Executive Committee is EDD’s principal decision making body and considers key matters affecting or relevant to the LDA and the EDD, including those related to:

  • finance/budget;
  • workforce (including human resources) and governance (including audit and compliance);
  • information and communications technology;
  • government and directorate priorities; and
  • emerging issues.
NamePosition
David DawesChief Executive Officer, Suburban Land Agency Director-General, Economic Development
Directorate
Catherine HudsonDeputy Director-General, Economic Development, Policy and Governance
Dan StewartDeputy Director-General, Land Development, Strategy and Finance
Shane O’LearyExecutive Director, Tourism, Events and Sport

Land Executive Committee

The Land Executive Committee manages ongoing operational issues, oversees project delivery and the LDA Risk Register review, and addresses organisational management issues.

NamePosition
David DawesChief Executive Officer, Suburban Land Agency Director-General, Economic Development
Directorate
Dan StewartDeputy Director-General, Land Development, Strategy and Finance
Chris ReynoldsExecutive Director, Land Development
Hamish McNultyExecutive Director, Infrastructure and Capital Works
Dermot WalshChief Finance Officer, Strategic Finance
Paul LewisDirector, Urban Renewal
Greg EllisDirector, Sustainable Land Strategy
Clint PetersDirector, Sales, Marketing and Estate Management

This meeting is also attended by Senior Project Managers.

Land Development, Strategy and Finance WHS Committee

The LDA’s Workplace Health and Safety Committee (WHSC) facilitates consultation and communication between employees, represented unions and management. It also monitors the effectiveness of the safety management system and develops initiatives and programs to achieve improved outcomes in health and safety.

Name

WHSC role

General title

Chris Reynolds

Co-Chair

Executive Director, Land Development

Dan Stewart

Co-Chair

Deputy Director-General, Land Development, Land Strategy and Finance

Joanne Rosewarne

Senior HR Manager

Senior HR Manager

Leanne Martens

Secretariat

HR Manager — Workforce and Governance

Catherine Welch

WHS Coordinator

Senior HR Advisor — Workforce and Governance

Daniel Santosuosso

Health and Safety Rep

Land Development

Mark Overton

Health and Safety Rep

Land Development

Lynette Marsh

Health and Safety Rep

Infrastructure and Capital Works

Simon Tennent

Health and Safety Rep

Land Release/Sustainable Land Strategy

Stephen Terracini

Health and Safety Rep

Sales and Marketing

Ed Senti

Health and Safety Rep

Strategic Finance

Adam Nugent

Admin/Facilities

Estate Management Officer

Steve Polsen

Admin/Facilities

Estate Management Officer

David Pitt, Luke BrownChief Minister and Treasury Directorate AdvisorChief Minister and Treasury Directorate Safety Support Team

Joint Venture Management Committees

The joint ventures in Crace, Forde and Woden Green are each managed by a Joint Venture Management Committee (JVMC). Separate project control groups manage the operational aspects of each respective site.

Crace

Crace in Gunghalin is a joint venture between the LDA and Crace Developments Pty Ltd. Crace Developments is a consortium with CIC as project manager and lead partner. The other consortium partners are Defence Housing Australia (DHA), CHC Affordable Housing and investment company, Tatebrook Pty Ltd. Crace has HIA Greensmart© accreditation —a Canberra first — and a special arrangement with Greening Australia is offsetting emissions during the development process.

To find out more visit www.crace.com.au

Forde

Forde in Gungahlin is a joint venture development between the LDA and Forde Development Pty Ltd. Forde Development is a consortium between CIC and Lend Lease. Dedicated to creating a genuine sense of community and a respect for the surrounding natural bushland, Forde has a strong focus on sustainability. The Forde joint venture development is expected to be completed by December 2013 subject to completion of all infrastructure and handover of assets.

Woden Green

Woden Green was a joint venture development between the LDA and Hindmarsh Property Development. The planning of Woden Green was formed as a ‘residential lifestyle estate’ setting a new standard in innovation and quality for multi-generational living. This has led to an emphasis on high quality, architecturally designed, fully adaptable housing integrated into an environmentally sensitive landscaped environment. The development aims to achieve walkability, active street frontages and a proactive approach to achieving a wide range of housing outcomes in close proximity to the Woden Town Centre.

The joint venture was concluded on 31 December 2012 with an agreement to sell the balance holding lease to Woden East Pty Ltd. The final administrative matters are expected to be completed by 30 November 2013.

Details of the financial statements for 2012-13 for all joint ventures are provided in div A6 of this report.

Further information may be obtained from:

Senior Business Manager
Telephone: (02) 6207 8263

C6. Human resources performance

Under a Memorandum of Understanding arrangement between the LDA and the EDD, the EDD Workforce and Governance Human Resource (HR) Unit continued to provide strategic, operational and technical advice and HR support to executives, managers and staff of the LDA. The unit performs a number of HR functions for the LDA and facilitates provision of support from the ACT Government Shared Services Centre. The HR priorities were guided by the EDD Strategic Plan 2011-12, which identified the need for a continued focus on strengthening the capability and skills of the workforce, ensuring a safe and productive work environment, providing effective performance feedback and building an innovative and collaborative workforce.

Delivering for the future

The LDA continues to build its organisational capability by ensuring it has a professional, innovative and experienced workforce with the ability to respond to future needs. Attraction and retention of key staff continues to be a principal objective of the LDA to ensure these needs are met. New employees are supported through a quarterly internal induction program and all employees are encouraged to attend professional development activities both in-house and external to the LDA and the EDD.

The relationship between HR and Shared Services HR has been strengthened through a nurturing of working relationships. This has led to streamlined processes and improved efficiencies for the LDA.

Reporting structures were reviewed and updated in collaboration with the Shared Services HR Reporting Team to improve the quality of reported HR data for divisions, and the LDA Board.

The ACTPS Economic Development Portfolio Enterprise Agreement 2011–13 nominally expired on 30 June 2013. Work commenced in the third quarter 2012-13 on development and negotiation of new enterprise agreements that will be occupation-based rather than agency-based as has been the case in the past.

Strengthening organisational resilience

Organisational resilience is an important factor in ensuring the workplace culture provides a safe working environment and a highly committed and motivated workforce. The LDA has been building a positive workplace culture by providing Respect, Equity and Diversity (RED) training to all managers and staff to increase staff and management awareness and by providing a safe working environment to encourage a highly committed, motivated and productive workforce.

The EDD is continuing to implement a number of health and wellbeing initiatives as well as promoting ownership of health and safety across the EDD and the management of an effective, efficient and consistent injury management process.

An Employee Assistance Program is in place to provide counselling service and support to all employees and immediate family members.

Sustaining community confidence

The LDA acknowledges the importance of the community having confidence in its actions. To achieve this, the LDA continues to promote and utilise training opportunities for staff in governance and risk management practices, and continues to promote awareness of the RED framework to embed an ethical and integrity based culture. The LDA participates in the EDD Portfolio RED Contact Officer’s Network Group, chaired by the RED Executive Sponsor and comprising RED contact officers.

The LDA also participates in the EDD staff awards program, which is based around the ACT Public Service values of ‘respect, integrity, collaboration and innovation’, and nominations are open to all staff. Through this program, staff are rewarded and recognised for outstanding contributions within the workplace and/or the greater community as a result of their work.

Working collaboratively

Through working collaboratively both within the LDA and with the wider public service and the community, the LDA is able to develop and progress policies and practices for the benefit of all.

During the reporting period, LDA has again participated in the EDD Consultative Committee and Workplace Consultative Committees, which continued to meet quarterly to consolidate consultation and communication between managers, staff and unions. WHS Committees have also continued to operate collaboratively, while a Health and Safety Representative Network and a RED Contact Officer Network have been established. A bi-monthly Senior Manager’s Forum (including all Senior Officers Grades A and B, and Executives) ensures a regular update of information from the Chief Executive Officer, a networking opportunity and the sharing of experiences across the Directorate and its portfolio agencies.

The LDA and EDD Work Health and Safety Strategic Plan aims to build work health and safety into the culture. The WHS Strategic Plan incorporates a Due Diligence Action and Reporting Plan that is reported on monthly to the Senior Executive Committee and guides the health and safety initiatives for the Directorate. The LDA together with the EDD has led the way by developing ‘Interim Guidelines for Managing Work Health and Safety in Construction Projects’ that aim to provide a systematic approach to the integration of work health and safety requirements into all aspects of a construction project. These guidelines will be adopted across the ACT Government.

Enhancing skills and capabilities

The LDA is committed to the development and retention of competent and skilled employees. This has been achieved by facilitating a number of in-house training programs to provide skills enhancement opportunities to employees on professional and personal matters. During the reporting period the LDA also supported agency-specific development initiatives as well as participation in whole-of-government programs.

New employees commencing in the LDA are provided with a one-on-one induction conducted by the HR Unit. In addition, employees attend a comprehensive EDD Portfolio

Induction Program, which is delivered to new staff members on a quarterly basis. The program provides an overview of the functions of the LDA, EDD and other portfolio agencies, an understanding of the expectations on employees in the workplace and knowledge of the conditions of service.

Performance management is a key strategy for developing a professional, experienced, collaborative and innovative workforce that has the capacity to deliver the LDA’s business goals and performance measures. The Performance Management Program enables managers and supervisors to undertake performance feedback as part of their regular management practice and responsibilities. The program has been designed to align individual performance goals with those of the LDA, establish clear and agreed work expectations, and to identify and address individual learning and development needs including any skill gaps. In addition, use of the program assists with the identification and resolution of any performance-related problems as well as with the recognition of good performance.

Further information may be obtained from:

Director, Workforce and Governance
Telephone: (02) 6205 9626

C7. Staffing profile

The LDA comprises a workforce of 94 people with the majority (91.48 per cent) employed on a permanent basis. Permanent part-time employees make up 17.02 per cent of the workforce, with the majority being female. There has been an increase in this reporting period across all equity and diversity groups with 16 per cent of employees identifying as being an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander, from a culturally and linguistically diverse background or having a disability.

FTE and headcount

 

Female

Male

Total

FTE by gender (%)

40.0

49.2

89.2

Headcount by gender (no.)

44.0

50.0

94.0

% of workforce (headcount)

46.8

53.2

100.0

Classifications

   

Classification group

Female

Male

Total

Administrative Officers

19

6

25

Executive Officers

0

4

4

Senior Officers

25

40

65

Total

44

50

94

Employment category by gender

   

Employment category

Female

Male

Total

Casual

0

0

0

Permanent full-time

27

43

70

Permanent part-time

14

2

16

Temporary full-time

3

5

8

Temporary part-time

0

0

0

Total

44

50

94

Average length of service by age-group by gender

Average length of service

Pre-Baby Boomers

Baby Boomers

Generation X

Generation Y

Total

 

F

M

F

M

F

M

F

M

F

M

0–2 years

0

0

0

2

2

5

2

1

4

8

 

2–4 years

0

0

0

1

4

3

6

2

10

6

 

4–6 years

0

1

6

2

8

2

2

0

16

5

 

6–8 years

0

0

0

2

3

3

2

0

5

5

8–10 years

0

0

0

1

0

4

1

1

1

6

 

10–12 years

0

0

0

3

1

3

0

0

1

6

 

12–14 years

0

0

0

1

1

1

0

0

1

2

 

14+ years

0

0

3

9

3

3

0

0

6

12

Total

0

1

9

21

22

24

13

4

44

50

Generation

Birth years covered

Generation

Birth years covered

Pre-Baby Boomers

prior to 1946

Generation X

1965 to 1979 inclusive

Baby Boomers

1946 to 1964 inclusive

Generation Y

from 1980 and onwards

 

Total average length of service by gender

Gender

Average length of service

Female

7.2

Male

10.3

Total

8.8

Age profile

Age group

Female

Male

Total

 

<20 years

0

0

0

20–24 years

3

0

3

25–29 years

6

1

7

30–34 years

8

8

16

 

35–39 years

3

7

10

40–44 years

10

8

18

45–49 years

6

5

11

50–54 years

3

10

13

55–59 years

4

4

8

60–64 years

0

5

5

65–69 years

1

2

3

70+ years

0

0

0

Total

44

50

94

Agency profile

  

Branch/division

FTE

Headcount

Land Development

57.5

61

Office of the Deputy Director-General

1.8

2

Strategic Finance

13.1

14

Urban Renewal

16.9

17

Total

89.3

94

Agency profile by employment type

Branch/division

Permanent

Temporary

Casual

Total

Land Development

58

3

0

61

Office of the Deputy Director-General

1

1

0

2

Strategic Finance

11

3

0

14

Urban Renewal

16

1

0

17

Total

86

8

0

94

Equity and workplace diversity (headcount)

 

Category A Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander

Category B Culturally and linguistically diverse

Category C People with disability

Employees who identify in category A, B or C*

Women

Headcount

2

10

3

15

44

% of total staff (headcount)

2.1

10.6

3.2

16.0

46.8

The statistics exclude board members, staff not paid by the ACT Public Service and people on leave without pay. Staff members who had separated from the ACT Public Service, but received a payment have been included.

Further information may be obtained from:

Director, Workforce and Governance
Telephone: (02) 6205 9626

C8. Learning and development

The LDA remains committed to providing learning and development opportunities to strengthen and build its workforce capability, retention and performance. This has been achieved by coordinating a range of ‘in-house’ learning and development opportunities, utilising the ACT Public Service training calendar, conferences and various specialist programs to develop and enhance our workforce skills and knowledge. The LDA participated in the Economic Development Directorate (EDD) Learning and Development Program, which was informed by legislative requirements, whole-of-government initiatives and LDA and EDD priorities. The learning and development activities included, but were not limited to, the programs outlined below. There was a particular focus over the year on work health and safety and contract management training.

Induction program

During the reporting period the LDA participated in the quarterly induction program for new staff from EDD, the LDA and other portfolio agencies. The induction program is divided into two half day sessions with the first providing current and new employees with an overview of the functions of the EDD (including the LDA) and an opportunity to network and learn about the EDD portfolio. The second session is specifically aimed at new employees and is designed to provide them with an understanding of expectations in the workplace, conditions of service and workplace health and safety. LDA Executives were present at all induction programs for new staff.

Coaching skills for leaders and managers

Yellow Edge conducted a program focused on key coaching skills and methodologies to improve engagement and performance of the organisation. It was also designed to provide the tools to assist managers in improving their individual leadership effectiveness. Fourteen LDA staff attended the sessions.

Giving and receiving feedback

Training was conducted by Interaction Consulting Group to develop and enhance the skills of managers to assist in providing feedback to their staff.

Procurement training

Information sessions were held to inform staff of the changes being made to goods and services purchasing. These sessions were presented to staff by Shared Services Procurement.

Cultural awareness training

Cultural awareness training was conducted by Indigenous presenters from the Yurauna Centre, CIT to increase awareness of contemporary Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander communities.

Construction induction card (white card training) and asbestos awareness training

This training, provided by Parasol and the Master Builders Association of the ACT, continued to be provided to staff who attend construction sites as part of their employment. Six LDA staff attended the construction induction card (white card) training and ten LDA staff attended the asbestos awareness training.

Other Whole of Government Learning and Development Opportunities

InitiativeNo. of participants who attended each
program
ACTPS Graduate Program3
Young Professionals’ Network0
Future Leaders Program0*
Executive Development Program0
PSM Program0
Sponsored training for first-time and front-line managers0

*CMTD did not conduct the Future Leaders Program during the reporting period. Nominations were held over until the 2013-14 financial year.

Studies assistance

The LDA supported staff through the Studies Assistance Program by providing paid and unpaid leave and payment of course costs for staff to undertake tertiary study. Two staff members were supported during the 2012-13 reporting period with an investment by the LDA of $1,820.25.

The learning and development opportunities offered through the Shared Services Training Calendar were promoted to staff with approximately 35 staff attending training at an estimated cost of $12,425.20.

Further information may be obtained from:

Director, Workforce and Governance
Telephone: (02) 6205 9626

C9. Workplace health and safety

Work health and safety (WHS) is managed in accordance with the statutory provisions of the Work Health and Safety Act 2011 (the Act) and supported by the ACTPS Workers Compensation and Work Safety Improvement Plan: Case Management and Performance Measurement. The LDA acknowledges the importance of maintaining the health, safety and welfare of its workers and commits to minimising the human and financial costs of injury and illness through active preventative strategies.

During the reporting period the LDA was not issued under part 10 of the Act with any improvement, prohibition or non-disturbance notices and, as such, did not fail to comply with any notice issued. It did not receive or fail to comply with any enforceable undertakings under part 11 of the Act; and did not receive or fail to comply with a safety duty under part 2 (divisions 2.2, 2.3 and 2.4) of the Act.

Major WHS achievements during the reporting period included development of the WHS Strategic Plan, which aims to build WHS into organisational culture. The WHS Strategic Plan has a Due Diligence Action and Reporting Plan that guides the health and safety initiatives for the LDA as part of the EDD portfolio. The LDA, together with the Economic Development Directorate (EDD), has also developed ‘Interim Guidelines for Managing Work Health and Safety in Construction Projects’. The interim guidelines were developed with oversight by the LDA Board Work Health and Safety Sub-Committee. The interim guidelines are being adopted across the whole-of-government and aim to provide a systematic approach to the integration of WHS requirements into all aspects of a construction project.

Health and safety structures

The LDA is represented on the Land Development, Strategy and Finance (LDSF) Health and Safety Committee. The Committee meets on a quarterly basis to provide a mechanism for consultation, coordination and communication between employees, represented unions and management. It also monitors the effectiveness of the safety management system, considers injury prevention initiatives and programs, and promotes the achievement of improved health and safety outcomes.

Copies of the minutes of the LDSF Work Health and Safety Committee meetings are uploaded to the intranet and provided to the LDA Board. The LDA has five elected Health and Safety representatives.

In 2012-13 EDD, on behalf of the LDA, reported one notifiable incident (the fall of a metal sheet from TransACT building rooftop in high wind) to the regulator in accordance with Part 3, Section 38 of the Work Safety Act 2011.

Injury prevention and management

The LDA implemented a range of initiatives to help prevent injuries to workers including:

  • workstation assessments and manual handling presentations for staff;
  • induction sessions for staff that includes WHS information;
  • a review of current, and the establishment of new, WHS risk registers for the LDA;
  • quarterly LDSF Health and Safety Committee meetings;
  • mandatory Respect, Equity and Diversity training;
  • asbestos awareness and construction white card training;
  • engagement of rehabilitation providers for both compensable and non-compensable injuries/illness to support employees to an early, safe and supported return to the workplace;
  • participation in whole-of-government Toolbox sessions for managers to build capability in managing workers who have an injury;
  • participation in whole-of-government Toolbox sessions on managing psychological injury in the workplace;
  • including WHS as a standing item at all team meetings, with a WHS checklist developed to assist managers to review work health and safety at team meetings;
  • a review of all WHS reporting and notification arrangements for the LDA;
  • participation in the SafeTALK program that teaches members of the community to recognise persons with thoughts of suicide and to connect them to suicide intervention resources;
  • participation in events such as Lifeline Stress Down Day;
  • representation on the whole-of-government work safety working group;
  • representation on the whole-of-government health and wellbeing network; and
  • regular awareness and reminders of WHS matters at a range of staff division meetings.

Health and wellbeing programs

The LDA continued its commitment to promoting a culture where health, safety and wellbeing are a part of everyday business. A range of health and wellbeing initiatives were implemented across the LDA including:

  • a ‘Health and Wellbeing’ reimbursement initiative to financially support employees (not exceeding $100 per annum) to participate in health and wellbeing activities;
  • providing a carer’s room for staff;
  • providing and promoting professional and confidential counselling services to staff and their families through the Employee Assistance Program (EAP) provided by IPS/PPC Worldwide;
  • promoting the EAP Manager Assist program;
  • providing a weight loss program for staff;
  • offering onsite influenza vaccinations to staff; and
  • organising a weekly lunchtime walking group for staff.

Further information may be obtained from:

Director, Workforce and Governance
Telephone: (02) 6205 9626

C10. Workplace relations

The ACT Public Service Economic Development Portfolio Enterprise Agreement 2011–13 (the Agreement) provides conditions of service, including salary, allowances, and leave for all non-executive employees of the LDA. Work has commenced on the development of new agreements covering classification groups and these are expected to be implemented during the next reporting period. The current Agreement has a nominal expiry date of 30 June 2013, but will remain in force until the new agreements come into effect.

The Agreement provides scope for individual Special Employment Arrangements (SEAs) to be agreed with staff in exceptional circumstances and where specific criteria are satisfied. SEAs allow for high levels of remuneration to be paid as part of an attraction and retention strategy, and where market rates exceed those otherwise payable by the LDA under the terms of the Agreement.

As at 30 June 2013, there were 14 active SEAs operating within the LDA. No SEAs ceased operation. Six new SEAs were commenced during the 2012-13 financial year.

Further information may be obtained from:

Description

No. of individual group SEAs

No. of group SEAs

Total employees covered by group SEAs

Total
 

A

B

C

(A+C)

SEAs

Number of SEAs at 30 June 2013

14

0

0

14

Number of SEAs entered into during period

6

0

0

6

Number of SEAs terminated during period

0

0

0

0

Number of SEAs providing for privately plated vehicles as at 30 June 2013

0

0

0

0

Number of SEAs for employees who have transferred from AWAs during period

0

0

0

0

AWAs

Number of AWAs at 30 June 2013

0

0

0

0

Number of AWAs terminated/lapsed (including 0 0 0 0 formal termination and those that have lapsed due to staff departures)

0

0

0

0

 

Classification range

Remuneration as a 30 June 2012

Individual and group SEAs

SOGB-SPOA

$129,426-$185,056

AWAs (includes AWAs ceased during reporting period)

N/A

0

   
Director, Workforce and Governance
Telephone: (02) 6205 9626

C11. Human Rights Act 2004

The Human Rights Act 2004 is part of the ACT Government’s commitment to build a human rights culture in the ACT and to ensure that Territory managers are working within a human rights framework. All public officials have a duty to interpret the legislation under which they operate consistently with human rights, unless the Territory law clearly authorises otherwise.

Under div 40 of the Human Rights Act 2004 the LDA is a public authority. The majority of the LDA’s functions involve commercial relationships with business entities. The LDA discharges those functions in accordance with its obligations under div 40B of the Human Rights Act 2004, whereby it is unlawful to act in a way that is incompatible with a human right or, in making a decision, to fail to give proper consideration to a relevant human right.

In its interactions with individuals, primarily through land sales, the LDA applies clear and transparent sale processes to protect the rights of all parties. It also provides comprehensive pre-sale material to intending purchasers that fully informs them of all relevant issues.

In all its dealings with staff, members of the public and the business community, the LDA acts in a way that takes its responsibilities into account and is respectful of human rights.

The LDA continued to actively work towards creating a positive work culture with ongoing promotion of the Respect, Equity and Diversity (RED) initiative. Mandatory training for RED continues with all new staff (including management and executive level staff) participating in a variety of RED training courses outwardly promoting core human rights principles. During 2012-13 22 staff participated in RED training. The Human Rights Commission and other ACT Public Service brochures and publications outlining human rights are available to staff and the rights and obligations under the Human Rights Act 2004are included in new starter induction packages.

Further information may be obtained from:

Director, Workforce and Governance
Telephone: (02) 6205 9626

C12. Strategic Bushfire Management Plan

The LDA complies with the requirements of the Government’s Strategic Bushfire Management Plan (SBMP) for the ACT.

The Emergencies Act 2004requires the Emergency Services Agency (ESA) to develop a SBMP. The SBMP establishes the basis and framework for efficient, effective and comprehensive management of fire and fire-related activities to protect human life, property, assets and the environment. One of the requirements of the plan is that land managers inside the Bushfire Abatement Zone produce a Bushfire Operational Plan (BOP).

The LDA prepares a Bushfire Management Plan to cover areas under its land management control and sets out individual requirements and commitments in a BOP.

The LDA’s BOP comprises a variety of methods to reduce or remove fire fuels such as dead and damaged trees, long dry grass and fallen branches, some shrub and lower branches, bark and leaves. In 2012-13 these methods included physical removal, slashing, mowing, grazing, general maintenance and creation of fire suppression trails.

All areas in which these methods are applied are monitored for regrowth and any further risks or hazards.

In 2012-13 slashing was carried out on over 216 hectares at Block 766 Bonner (Horse Park Homestead), Moncrieff, Jacka, Lawson South, Gungahlin Town Centre, Hume, Wright and Coombs.

Grazing of livestock is used in areas not considered environmentally sensitive. In 2012-13, 513.6hectares of land in Moncrieff, Lawson South and Glenloch were grazed.

In addition, the LDA undertakes individual bushfire risk assessments for estates as directed by ESA’s SBMP and using the Environment and Sustainable Development Directorate’s (formerly ACTPLA) guidelines ‘Planning for Bushfire Risk Mitigation General Code 2008’.

Bushfire mitigation strategies identified as a result of these assessments are implemented in development of the estates or included in individual sale conditions as well as in englobo sale of land to the private sector for its development.

Further information may be obtained from:

Senior Business Manager
Telephone: (02) 6207 8263

C13. Strategic asset management

The LDA has an Asset Management Plan covering planned fixed asset acquisitions and disposals for the period 2012-13 and addressing the principles and requirements of the ACT Asset Management Strategy.

The plan covers all assets utilised by the LDA in its service delivery including leased and financed assets. It addresses asset management directions and strategies, asset acquisitions or replacements, office accommodation, asset maintenance and asset reuse or rationalisation opportunities.

Assets managed

As at 30 June 2013, the LDA managed assets valued at $4.165 million comprising one building at Kingston Foreshore, leasehold improvements and office equipment. This does not include leased motor vehicles or leased office equipment.

These assets are held at independent valuation (building) and cost (leasehold improvements and office equipment), net of accumulated depreciation.

It should be noted that land purchased from the Commonwealth and ACT Government and land development works in progress are treated as inventory by the LDA and valued at the lower of cost or net realisable value in accordance with Australian Accounting Standards and do not form part of the LDA’s fixed asset register.

AssetsProperties
Built property assetsFormer Kingston Transport depot (occupied by the Old Bus Depot Markets, the Burley Griffin Antique Centre and former LDA offices)
Leasedhold improvementGround floor, level 6 and level 7, TransACT House
OtherOffice equipment

During 2012-13, minor leasehold improvements were added to the LDA’s asset register. No assets were removed from the LDA’s asset register.

Assets maintenance and upgrade

In 2012-13 the LDA operational assets valued at $4.165 million were subject to general repairs and maintenance only. No upgrades were undertaken.

Office accommodation

The LDA has provision to accommodate 125 employees and contractors occupying approximately 1,877m 2 of office accommodation on the ground floor, level 6 and level 7 of TransACT House, 470 Northbourne Avenue, Dickson.

Further information may be obtained from:

Senior Business Manager
Telephone: (02) 6207 8263

C14. Capital works

The LDA carries out a significant number of civil infrastructure and landscape construction programs in conducting its land development activities. Most expenditure is incurred in constructing major infrastructure items and servicing estates.

Civil infrastructure construction — work in progress

Project

Original estimates

Year of approval

Original estimated completion

Revised completion

date

Revised total project value

Amaroo Group Centre

$7,310,000

2012

06/2013

12/2013

$7,5000,000

Coombs 2 Residential Estate

$22,134,506

2012

10/2013

11/2013

$22,327,212

Coombs 3 Residential Estate

$14,502,142

2012

07/2014

07/2014

$14,502,142

Kingston Boat Harbour

$4,000,000

2011

05/2012

08/2014

$4,000,000

Civil infrastructure — completed

Project

Original estimates

Final costs

Estimated completion

Practical completion

Financially complete

O’Brien Place Gungahlin

$691,632

$1,386,017

12/2012

06/2013

No

Jacka 1 Residential Estate

$9,247,123

$9,247,123

12/2012

01/2012

No

Wright Stage 1B Variation to Wright 1A

$17,780,000

$17,780,000

04/2012

10/2012

No

New West Infrastructure

$16,574,923

$16,574,923

01/2012

10/2012

No

Kingston Stage 4

$12,226,892

$15,000,000

12/2011

08/2012

No

Kingston Canal Bridge

$1,234,376

$1,234,376

11/2012

10/2012

Yes

Wright Stage 2 Variation to Wright 1A contract

$15,155,592

$14,514,466

07/2012

11/2012

No

Gungahlin Blocks 2 & 3

Section 226

$469,345

$458,383.68

04/2012

04/2013

No

Gungahlin Block 1 Section 228 temporary footpaths

$125,207.50

$120,433.75

11/2012

04/2013

No

Landscape construction — work in progress

Project

Original estimates

Year of approval

Original estimated completion

Revised completion date

Revised total project value

Wright Stage 1A Landscape Works Reserve Buffer

$1,557,380

2012

02/2013

12/2013

$1,800,000

Bonner 3 Open Space

$2,312,481

2013

04/2014

04/2014

$2,312,481

Bonner 4 Open Space

$1,307,360

2012

01/2015

11/2015

$1,307,360

Kingston Public Realm Landscaping

$9,019,331

2012

12/2014

12/2014

$9,465,024

Kingston Public Realm Boardwalk

$3,474,366

2012

06/2012

05/2015

$3,925,553

Landscape construction — completed

Project

Original estimates

Final costs

Estimated completion

Practical completion

Financially complete

Bonner 2 Open Space Landscaping

$1,545,131

$1,545,131

09/2011

01/2012

No

Gungahlin Town Centre Shade Structure

$175,758

$198,759

12/2010

10/2012

Yes

Senior Business Manager
Telephone: (02) 6207 8263

C15. Government contracting

Procurement principles and processes

The LDA’s procurement selection and management processes for all contractors including consultants was compiled in accordance with the Government Procurement Act 2001 and Government Procurement Regulation 2007, and subordinate guidelines and circulars.

The Government Procurement Regulation 2007sets select tender and tender thresholds and required procurement plans for procurements values at $1 million or more to be reviewed by the ACT Government Procurement Board.

The LDA engaged a range of consultants and contractors to provide specialist resource need in relation to specific functions. In 2012-13 this included civil engineers, geotechnical engineers, urban designers, planners and environmental planners.

Contracts and consultants

The LDA uses external sources of labour and services to meet objectives. The following tables list the contract entities used to provide professional services to the LDA where the total amount expended, equalled or exceeded $25,000 or where smaller contracts awarded to the same contractor exceeded $25,000 in total in 2012-13.

Jul 12–Jun 13 Feb 10

Contracting entity

Description

Month contract let

Cost

($ ex-GST)

Procurement method

A & K LONERGAN PTY LTD

Detailed Land Survey — Taylor

Feb 13

146,818

Panel

ACT GEOTECHNICAL ENGINEERS PTY LTD

Engineering Services — Multiple Contracts

Jul 12–Jun 13

82,334

Various

AECOM AUSTRALIA PTY LTD

Remediation — Macarthur 7/398

Mar 13

20,863

Panel

AECOM AUSTRALIA PTY LTD

Planning Services

— Belconnen 6/48

May 13

25,202

Panel

AECOM AUSTRALIA PTY LTD

Environmental Assessments — Multiple Contracts

Jul 12–Jun 13

33,693

Various

AECOM AUSTRALIA PTY LTD

Remediation — Kingston Foreshore Site 19

Aug 10

42,962

Public tender

AECOM AUSTRALIA PTY LTD

Interchange

Options Study —

Yarralumla

Sep 12

45,425

Panel

AECOM AUSTRALIA

PTY LTD

Project Validation

& Site Audit —

Kingston Foreshore

Apr 10

50,520

Select tender

AECOM AUSTRALIA

PTY LTD

Planning &

Engineering —

Franklin 3A & 3B

Mar 08

56,126

Public tender

AECOM AUSTRALIA PTY LTD

Planning & Engineering Services —Multiple Contracts

Jul 12–Jun 13

68,720

Various

AECOM AUSTRALIA PTY LTD

Environmental
Compliance —
Kingston Foreshore

May 11

79,325

Public tender

AECOM AUSTRALIA PTY LTD

Environmental Program Manager – Kingston Foreshore

Aug 10

193,118

Public tender

AECOM AUSTRALIA PTY LTD

EIS – MONCRIEFF

Aug 12

199,850

Select tender

AECOM AUSTRALIA PTY LTD

Environmental
Compliance —
Kingston Foreshore

May 11

79,325

Public tender

AECOM AUSTRALIA

PTY LTD

Molonglo 2

Environmental

Testing —

Jul 12

245,675

Panel

ANTHONY QUINN

SURVEYS PTY LTD

Survey Services —

Multiple Contracts

Jul 12–Jun 13

51,090

Various

AURECON

AUSTRALIA PTY

LTD

Environmental

Assessment —

Multiple Contracts

Jul 12–Jun 13

15,045

Various

AURECON

AUSTRALIA PTY

LTD

Parking Study —

Kingston 46/19

Jan 11

22,000

Panel

AURECON

AUSTRALIA PTY

LTD

Golden Sun Moth

Survey — Multiple

Contracts

Jul 12–Jun 13

39,850

Various

AURECON

AUSTRALIA PTY LTD

Vegetation

Assessments — Multiple Contracts

Jul 12–Jun 1344,686Various

AURECON

AUSTRALIA PTY

LTD

Environmental

Technical Advice

— Former

Belconnen Sewage

Works

Apr 10

158,072

Single select

BIOSIS RESEARCH

PTY LTD

Heritage

Jul 12–Jun 13

37,881

Various

Assessment —

   

Multiple Contracts

   

BROWN

Planning Services

Jul 12–Jun 13

50,391

Various

CONSULTING (ACT)

— Multiple

   

PTY LTD

Contracts

   

BIOSIS RESEARCH

PTY LTD

Multiple Contracts

Flora and Fauna

Assessments —

Jul 12–Jun 13

61,530

Various

   

BIOSIS RESEARCH PTY LTD

Contamination Report — Throsby Stage 2

Feb 13

133,780

Panel

BLAK BOX PTY LTD

Feasibility Analysis

Jul 12–Jun 13

27,709

Various

 

& Advice —

   
 

Multiple Contracts

   

BLAK BOX PTY LTD

Valuation Services

Jul 12–Jun 13

88,840

Panel

BOST PTY LTD

Mediation —

Feb 13

178,241

Tender

 

Gungaderra Creek

   

BROWN

Planning Services

Sep 12

25,200

Select tender

CONSULTING (ACT)

— Molonglo 2

   

PTY LTD

School Site

   

BROWN

Planning & Design

Oct 12

32,670

Panel

CONSULTING (ACT)

— Molonglo 2

   

PTY LTD

    

BROWN

Planning &

Sep 07

39,853

Public tender

CONSULTING (ACT)

Engineering —

   

PTY LTD

Bonner

   

BROWN

Planning &

Aug 11

44,907

Select tender

CONSULTING (ACT)

Engineering —

   

PTY LTD

Nicholls Section 73

   

BROWN

Site Investigations

Jul 12–Jun 13

46,860

Various

CONSULTING (ACT)

— Multiple

   

PTY LTD

Contracts

   

BROWN CONSULTING (ACT) PTY LTD

Engineering Design

— Coombs

Aug 12

50,498

Panel

BROWN CONSULTING (ACT) PTY LTD

Project Management Services — Multiple Contracts

Jul 12–Jun 13

58,035

Various

BROWN CONSULTING (ACT) PTY LTD

Site Management & Superintendency — Bonner 4

58,035

Public tender

BROWN

Engineering Design

Jul 12–Jun 13

86,501

Various

CONSULTING (ACT)

Services —

   

PTY LTD

Multiple Contracts

   

BROWN CONSULTING (ACT) PTY LTD

Detail Design & Documentation — Dickson

Jan 12

93,674

Public tender

BROWN

Site Investigation

Dec 12

102,582

Panel

CONSULTING (ACT)

and Traffic Impact

   

PTY LTD

Study — Dickson

   

BROWN

Engineering Design

Jan 12

116,990

Public tender

CONSULTING (ACT)

— Flemington

   

PTY LTD

Road Corridor

   

BROWN

Planning and

Sep 11

174,164

Public tender

CONSULTING (ACT)

Design —

   

PTY LTD

Moncrieff

   

BROWN

Civil Construction

Jan 11

232,927

Public tender

CONSULTING (ACT)

Superintendency

   

PTY LTD

— Hume West

   

CANBERRA

Survey Services —

Jul 12–Jun 13

30,400

Various

SURVEYS PTY LTD

Multiple Contracts

   

CAPITAL VALUERS

Valuation Services

Jul 12–Jun 13

52,940

Panel

PTY LTD

    

CARDNO (NSW/

Engineering &

Jul 12–Jun 13

39,130

Various

ACT) PTY LTD

Planning Services

   
 

— Multiple

   
 

Contracts

   

CARDNO (NSW/

Site Investigation

Aug 12

102,293

Panel

ACT) PTY LTD

— Watson 12/96

   

CARDNO (NSW/

Planning &

Mar 11

406,191

Public tender

ACT) PTY LTD

Engineering —

   
 

Lawson

   

CARDNO (NSW/

Estate Design —

Jul 11

415,515

Public tender

ACT) PTY LTD

Campbell Section 5

   

CARDNO (NSW/

Site

Dec 12

436,013

Public tender

ACT) PTY LTD

Management and

   
 

Superintendency

   
 

— Coombs

   

CARDNO (NSW/

Site Management

Mar 11

816,368

Public tender

ACT) PTY LTD

Consultancy —

   
 

Wright

   

CARDNO LANE

Remediation & Site

Jul 12–Jun 13

28,150

Various

PIPER

Audit Services — West Macgregor
(former Sewerage
Works)

   

CARDNO YOUNG PTY LTD

Planning & Engineering — Hume West

Dec 09

32,711

Select tender

CARDNO YOUNG PTY LTD

Estate Design — Campbell Section 5

Jul 11

226,554

Public tender

CARDNO YOUNG PTY LTD

Planning & Engineering — Coombs & Wright

Jan 10

904,481

Public tender

CBRE VALUATIONS PTY LTD

Planning Study — Multiple Contracts

Jul 12–Jun 13

44,920

Various

CBRE VALUATIONS PTY LTD

Valuation Services

Jul 12–Jun 13

143,377

Panel

CHAMBERLAINS LAW FIRM PTY LTD

Legal Advice

Jul 12–Jun 13

65,655

Panel

CHRIS DICKSON

Provision of GIS Services

Sep 12

24,952

Select tender

CHRIS DICKSON

Provision of GIS Services

Jan 13

27,220

Select tender

CHRIS DICKSON

Provision of GIS Services

May 13

25,180

Select tender

CIA LANDSCAPES

Landscape

Jul 12–Jun 13

34,787

Various

& COLOUR PTY

Consultancy —

   

LTD

Molonglo

   

CIRRUS

Project

Nov 09

99,245

Various

STRATEGIES

Management

   
 

Services

   

CLAYTON UTZ

Legal Services

Jul 12–Jun 13

155,487

Panel

COFFEY

Environmental

Jul 12–Jun 13

29,336

Panel

ENVIRONMENTS

Services —

   

PTY LTD

Multiple Contracts

   

COFFEY

Environmental

Sep 10

40,415

Select tender

ENVIRONMENTS

Assessment —

   

PTY LTD

Jacka

   

COFFEY

Environmental

May 12

84,501

Select tender

ENVIRONMENTS

Monitoring —

   

PTY LTD

Kenny

   

COFFEY

Environmental

Sep 11

185,622

Panel

ENVIRONMENTS

Assessment —

   

PTY LTD

Lawson South

   

COLEMAN

Civil Engineering

Dec 12

111,270

Public tender

ENGINEERING

Service

   

SERVICES PTY

    

LIMITED

    

COLIN STEWART

Planning Study —

Aug 12

22,797

Panel

ARCHITECTS PTY

Phillip

   

LTD

    

COLLIERS

Planning Services

Jul 12–Jun 13

9,250

Various

INTERNATIONAL

— Multiple

   

CONSULTANCY &

Contracts

   

VALUATION PTY

    

LTD

    

COLLIERS

Valuation Services

Jul 12–Jun 13

72,000

Panel

INTERNATIONAL

    

CONSULTANCY &

    

VALUATION PTY

    

LTD

    

COX

Urban Design &

Jul 12–Jun 13

96,967

Various

ARCHITECTURE

Planning Services

   

PTY LTD

— Multiple

   
 

Contracts

   

CROWE HORWATH

Accounting Advice

Sep 11

71,720

Single select

SYDNEY PTY LTD

    

DAVID HOGG PTY

Environmental

Jul 12–Jun 13

63,805

Various

LTD

Assessments —

   
 

Multiple Contracts

   

DFP DESIGN AND

Urban Design

Apr 12

79,740

Various

CONSTRUCTION

and Project

   
 

Management

   

DFP DESIGN AND

Urban Design

Feb 13

46,440

Select tender

CONSTRUCTION

and Project

   
 

Management

   

DRUMMOND

Project

Jun 12

109,000

Single select

DEVELOPMENTS

Consultancy

   
 

Services

   

DKO

Affordable Housing

Oct 12

68,182

Panel

ARCHITECTURE

Guide

   

PTY LTD

DOUGLAS

Geotechnical

Jul 12–Jun 13

78,990

Various

PARTNERS PTY

Assessments —

   

LTD

Multiple Contracts

   

EASTCLIFF PTY

Mediation Services

Jul 12–Jun 13

64,428

Various

LTD

— Multiple

   

Contracts

DOUGLAS

Geotechnical &

Dec 12

28,120

Single select

PARTNERS PTY

Contamination

   

LTD

Assessments —

   
 

Dickson

   

ELLEVEN CONSULTING PTY LTD

Financial Management & Taxation Advice

Jul 12

32,273

Single select

ELLEVEN

Financial

Jul 12

204,879

Single select

CONSULTING PTY

Management

   

LTD

    

ELLEVEN

Project

Jul 12

206,288

Single select

CONSULTING PTY

Management &

   

LTD

Technical Advice

   

ELLEVEN

Financial

Jul 12

283,984

Single select

CONSULTING PTY

Management &

   

LTD

Taxation Advice

   

ENVIRON AUST PTY LTD

Environmental Services — Multiple Contracts

Jul 12–Jun 13

8,181

Various

ENVIRON AUST

Environmental

Jan 12

50,446

Select tender

PTY LTD

Services —

   

Molonglo Stage 2

ENVIRONMENTAL

Cultural & Heritage

Jul 12–Jun 13

40,072

Various

RESOURCES

Assessments —

   

MANAGEMENT

Multiple Contracts

   

AUST

    

ENVIRONMENTAL

Heritage

Feb 13

108,416

Panel

RESOURCES

Assessment —

   

MANAGEMENT

Fyshwick Section

   

AUST

47 Stage 2

   

ENVIRONMENTAL

Environmental

Oct 10

176,334

Public tender

RESOURCES

Management —

   

MANAGEMENT

Kingston Foreshore

   

AUST

    

GEOFF KEOGH &

Work, Health &

Oct 12 & Dec 12

41,975

Select tender

ASSOCIATES PTY

Safety Guidelines

   

LTD

GEOMATIC

AND PROPERTY SERVICES AUSTRALIA

Detail Survey — Throsby

Jun 12

27,500

Panel

GHD PTY LTD

Superintendency

Oct 08

28,500

Select tender

 

— Gungahlin Town

   
 

Centre

   

GHD PTY LTD

Environmental

Jul 12–Jun 13

34,915

Various

 

Assessments —

   
 

Multiple Contracts

   

GHD PTY LTD

Contamination

Sep 12

45,251

Panel

 

Assessment —

   
 

Kenny

   

GHD PTY LTD

Planning Study —

Jun 12

49,500

Panel

 

Woden

   

GHD PTY LTD

Engineering Design

Aug 12

1,276,132

Public tender

 

— Greenway

   
 

Lakeside

   

GLAEBA (2) PTY LTD

Contamination Investigation — Fyshwick Section 47

Jul 12

22,341

Panel

GLAEBA (2) PTY LTD Symonston

Environmental Investigation — Symonston

Oct 12

69,744

Panel

GOLDER ASSOCIATES PTY LTD

Environmental Services — Campbell Section 5

May 11

7,500

Single select

GOLDER

Site Audit —

Nov 09

217,061

Single select

ASSOCIATES PTY

Kingston Foreshore

   

LTD

    

GOLDSMITH

Environmental

Mar 11

31,107

Panel

CIVIL &

Services —

   

ENVIRONMENTAL

Kingston Foreshore

   

GREEN BUILDING

Green Star

Feb 13

60,000

Single select

COUNCIL

Certification —

   

AUSTRALIA

Lawson South

   

GRIFFITH

Project

Jan 10

111,204

Single select

CONSULTING

Management

   
 

Services

   

GTA CONSULTANTS

Traffic & Parking

Jul 12–Jun 13

36,861

Various

 

Studies — Multiple

   
 

Contracts

   

GTA CONSULTANTS

Traffic Impact

Aug 12

33,348

Select tender

 

Assessment —

   
 

Woden Section 3

   
IAN C MILLS PTY LTDEngineering Consultancy ServiceJul 10 & Sep 1234,680Single select

INDESCO PTY LIMITED

Design Review — Symonston Industrial Park

Nov 12

25,000

Panel

INDESCO PTY LIMITED

Site Investigation — Downer Section 61

Nov 12

34,085

Panel

INDESCO PTY LIMITEDSite Investigation
— Yarralumla
Apr 1336,300Panel

INDESCO PTY

LIMITED

Planning &

Engineering Services — Multiple Contracts

Jul 12–Jun 13

38,471

Various

INDESCO PTY LIMITED

Site Investigation

— Woden Section 3

Aug 12

41,125

Select tender

INDESCO PTY

LIMITED

Planning & Design

— Moncrieff

Sep 11

53,040

Public tender

 

INDESCO PTY

LIMITED

Site Investigations

— Multiple

Contracts

Jul 12–Jun 13

58,703

Various

INDESCO PTY

Superintendency

Jun 10

69,798

Public tender

LIMITED

— Bonner 3

   

INDESCO PTY

Landscape

Nov 11

192,156

Public tender

LIMITED

Consultancy —

   
 

Lawson

   

INDESCO PTY

Superintendency

Dec 11

340,653

Public tender

LIMITED

— Jacka 1

   

IRWIN AND

Remediation —

Oct 12

25,679

Select tender

HARTSHORN PTY

Gungahlin Town

   

LTD

Centre

   

J EASTHOPE AND

ASSOC PTY LTD

Project

Jul 12–Jun 13

43,053

Various

Management& Certification — Multiple Contracts

   
JONES LANG
LASALLE AUST PTY LTD
Valuation ServicesJul 12–Jul 1397,950Panel

KAIZEN MANAGEMENT SERVICES

Safety Audit — Multiple Contracts

Jul 12–Jun 13

32,055

Various

KINESIS PTY LTD

IT Services

Jan 13

30,000

Single select

LAND DATA SURVEYS PTY LTD

Survey Services

— Greenway

Jun 12

33,260

Panel

LAND DATA SURVEYS PTY LTD

Survey Services

— Molonglo Stage 2

Jul 11

41,724

Panel

LAND DATA SURVEYS PTY LTD

Survey Services — Multiple Contracts

Jul 12-Une13

85,035

Various

LINK CORPORATE SERVICES PTY LTD

Financial Services & Advice

Jul 12

161,333

Single select

MACROPLAN AUSTRALIA PTY LTDRetail Market Analysis – CoombsNov 1228,500Select tender
MACROPLAN AUSTRALIA PTY LTDCost Benefit – Canberra BrickworksOct 12281,922Single select
MAIL MCDONALD BARNSLEY PTY LTDSurvey Services – Kingston ForeshoreSep 1228,310Panel
MACROPLAN AUSTRALIA PTY LTDSurvey Services – Kingston ForeshoreDec 0761,202Select tender

MANTEENA PTY

LTD

Kingston Boat

Harbour

Project

Management —

Mar 11

933,974

Public tender

MELINDA DODSON ARCHITECTS

Architectural Design — Molonglo

Oct 12

72,659

Public tender

MELINDA DODSON ARCHITECTS

Architectural Design

Oct 12

41,000

Public tender

MMJ REAL ESTATE

Valuation Services

Jul 12–Jul13

62,870

Panel

MOTT MADONALD

Planning &

Jul 12–Jun 13

34,383

Various

AUSTRALIA PTY

Engineering

   

LTD

Services — Multiple Contracts

   

MOTT MADONALD AUSTRALIA PTY LTD

Site Investigation

— Chapman 1/45

Jun 12

41,060

Panel

MOTT MADONALD AUSTRALIA PTY LTD

Site Investigation

— Latham 3/31

Jun 12

51,560

Panel

MOTT MADONALD AUSTRALIA PTY LTD

Site Investigations

— Multiple Contracts

Jul 12–Jun 13

97,585

Various

MOTT MADONALD AUSTRALIA PTY LTD

Geotechnical Infrastructure Works — Kingston Foreshore

Jan 10

233,813

Public tender

NAVIN OFFICER HERITAGE CONSULTANTSCultural & Heritage Study – TaylorJan 1327,518Select tender
NAVIN OFFICER HERITAGE CONSULTANTSCultural & Heritage Assessment – Multiple ContractsDec 1228,741Panel
NAVIN OFFICER HERITAGE CONSULTANTSHeritage Assessment – SymonstonNov 1229,835Panel
NORTHROP CONSULTING ENGINEERSPlanning Services — Multiple ContractsJul 12–Jun 1324,670Various
NORTHROP CONSULTING ENGINEERS

Site Investigation — Monash 5/52

Mar 1326,415Panel
NORTHROP CONSULTING ENGINEERSSite Investigation — Multiple ContractsJul 12–Jun 1345,850Panel
NORTHROP CONSULTING ENGINEERSSite Investigation – Garran 1/24Sep 1260,190Panel
NORTHROP CONSULTING ENGINEERSTemporary Carparking Study – Gungahlin District 654 &778Feb 13121,916Select tender

NORTHROP

Site Investigations

Jul 12–Jun 13

45,850

Panel

CONSULTING

— Multiple

   

ENGINEERS

Contracts

   

OXIGEN PTY LTD

Landscape

Dec 12

27,200

Select tender

 

Consultancy —

   
 

Coombs Stage 3

   

OXIGEN PTY LTD

Landscape Design

Sep 12

27,731

Select tender

 

— Coombs

   

OXIGEN PTY LTD

Landscape

Aug 10

48,623

Select tender

 

Consultancy —

   
 

Wright

   

OXIGEN PTY LTD

Landscaping

Jul 12–Jun 13

79,810

Various

 

Design Services —

   
 

Multiple Contracts

   

OXIGEN PTY LTD

Detail Design &

Aug 10

102,532

Single select

 

Superintendence

   
 

— Kingston

   
 

Foreshore Harbour

   
 

Promenade

   

PAXUS AUSTRALIA

IT Services

Sep 11

30,432

Single select

PTY LTD

    

PHILIP LEESON

Architectural

Jul 12–Jun 13

30,730

Various

ARCHITECTS PTY

Design — Multiple

   

LTD

Contracts

   

PHILIP LEESON

Architectural

Oct 12

45,000

Public tender

ARCHITECTS PTY

Design — Coombs

   

LTD

Demo Precinct

   

PHILIP LEESON ARCHITECTS PTY LTD

Architectural Design

Oct 12

56,545

Public tender

PRICE WATERHOUSE COOPERS

Taxation/GST Advice

Jul 12–Jun 13

1,571,894

Single select

PROVIDENCE CONSULTING GROUP

Engineering Consultancy

Nov 10

63,250

Single select

PURDON ASSOCIATES PTY LTDPlanning Services — Woden Section 9Feb 1128,396Select tender
PURDON ASSOCIATES PTY LTDPlanning Services — Multiple ContractsJul 12–Jun 1370,273Various

PURDON ASSOCIATES PTY LTD

Master Plan — Grevillea Park Kingston Foreshore

Mar 12

108,295

Panel

PURDON ASSOCIATES PTY LTDKingston Foreshore Section 49Dec 11140,103Panel

R D GOSSIP PTY LTD

Site Investigation & Planning Services — Multiple Contracts

Jul 12–Jun 13

70,858

Various

RANDSTAD PTY LIMITED

Temporary Staff Placement — Multiple Contracts

Jul 12–Jun 13

20,388

Various

RANDSTAD PTY LIMITED

Temporary Staff Placement

Aug 12

26,788

Single select

RANDSTAD PTY LIMITED

Temporary Staff Placement

Jun 12

36,850

Single select

RANDSTAD PTY LIMITED

Temporary Staff Placement

Apr 12

46,277

Single select

REDBOX DESIGN GROUP PTY LTD

Landscape Superintendency — Wright

Sep 12

29,904

Select tender

REDBOX DESIGN GROUP PTY LTD

Landscape Design & Management — Bonner

Mar 08

40,675

Public tender

REDBOX DESIGN GROUP PTY LTD

Landscape Consultancy — Coombs Stage 2

Jun 12

54,439

Select tender

REDBOX DESIGN GROUP PTY LTD

Landscape Consultancy — Coombs Stage 2

Jun 12

54,439

Select tender

REDBOX DESIGN GROUP PTY LTD

Landscape Design Services — Multiple Contracts

Jul 12–Jun 13

68,720

Various

REDBOX DESIGN GROUP PTY LTDLandscape Detailed Design — FranklinMay 1289,732Public tender
REDBOX DESIGN GROUP PTY LTDLandscape Design & Management — Bonner 3Jan 10116,585Public tender

RIVERVIEW GROUP

Development

Oct 12

17,679

Single select

PTY LTD

Management —

   
 

Wright

   

RIVERVIEW GROUP

Ecological

Jun 13

41,691

Single select

PTY LTD

Assessment —

   
 

Riverview

   

ROBERT JESSOP

Environmental

Jul 12–Jun 13

50,015

Various

PTY LTD

Investigations —

   
 

Multiple Contracts

   

SCENIC LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE PTY LTD

Landscape Design & Assessment – Multiple Contract

Jul 12-Jun 13

18,527

Various

SCENIC LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE PTY LTD

Landscape Design & Assessments — Multiple Contracts

Aug 12

30,979

Panel

SGS AUSTRALIA

Environmental

May 12

21,657

Single select

 

Testing —

   
 

Kingston Foreshore

   

SGS AUSTRALIA

Environment

Jul 12

71,596

Select tender

 

Laboratory Testing

   
 

— Kingston

   
 

Foreshore

   

SM PRECISION

Landscaping

Sep 12

35,377

Single select

BUILDING

Services —

   
 

Bonner 1–6/105

   

SMEC

Temporary Car

Jun 11

27,336

Public tender

 

park — Dickson

   

SMEC

Geotechnical

Mar 13

29,027

Select tender

 

Services —

   
 

Throsby

   

SMEC

Survey Services —

Dec 12

29,284

Panel

 

Stromlo

   

SMEC

Site Investigations

Jul 12–Jun 13

81,406

Panel

 

& Surveys —

   
 

Multiple Contracts

   

SMEC

Environmental

May 10

58,492

Public tender

 

Assessment —

   
 

Kingston Foreshore

   

SMEC

Planning &

Jul 12–Jun 13

95,598

Various

 

Environmental

   
 

Services —

   
 

Multiple Contracts

   

SMEC

Project Compliance

May 10

97,752

Public tender

 

— Kingston

   
 

Foreshore Package

   
 

5

   

SMEC

Project Compliance

May 10

99,097

Public tender

 

— Kingston

   
 

Foreshore Package

   
 

4

   

STAFFING AND

Temporary Staff

May 12

62,118

Single select

OFFICE SOLUTIONS

Placement

   

PTY LTD

    

TAIT WADDINGTON

Detail Design —

Dec 12

59,267

Panel

 

Kingston Harbour

   
 

Facilities

   

TAIT WADDINGTON

Masterplan

Jan 12

76,193

Panel

 

— Molonglo

   
 

Demonstration

   
 

Precinct

   

TAIT WADDINGTON

Housing Design

Jan 12

127,761

Panel

 

Integration

   
 

— Molonglo

   
 

Demonstration

   
 

Precinct

   

TAIT WADDINGTON

Planning &

Jul 12–Jun 13

34,597

Various

 

Advisory Services

   
 

— Multiple

   
 

Contracts

   

TAIT WADDINGTON

Concept Planning

Jan 13

38,180

Panel

 

— Coombs

   

THE EXPERT

Planning Services

Jul 12–Jun 13

23,945

Various

CLIENT PTY LTD

— Multiple

   
 

Contracts

   

THE EXPERT

CLIENT PTY LTD

Estate

Development

Plan — Kingston

Site 10

Sep 11

29,704

Public tender

THE EXPERT CLIENT PTY LTD

Housing Design Integration — Molonglo Demonstration Precinct

Jan 12

41,400

Panel

THE EXPERT CLIENT PTY LTD

Masterplan — Molonglo Demonstration Precinct

Jan 12

93,189

Panel

TRACT CONSULTANTS PTY

Urban Design Services – Multiple Contracts

Jul 12-Jun13

37,700

Various

TRACT CONSULTANTS PTY

Design Services – Woden Bus Interchange

Jun 12

65,000

Panel

TREADSTONE COMPANY PTY LTD

Planning, Design & Advisory Services

Jul 09

54,005

Single select

TUROSS HOLDING

Provision of

Jul 11

44,946

Single select

PYT LTD

Specialist

   
 

Regulatory & Policy

   
 

Advice

   

UMWELT

Ecological

Sep 12

54,230

Single select

AUSTRALIA PTY

Assessment —

   

LTD

Moncrieff

   

TRACT

Design Services

Jun 12

65,000

Panel

CONSULTANTS PTY

— Woden Bus

   

LTD

Interchange

   

UMWELT

Environmental

Jul 12–Jun 13

63,853

Various

AUSTRALIA PTY

Assessments —

   

LTD

Multiple Contracts

   

TRACT

Urban Design

Jul 12–Jun 13

37,700

Various

CONSULTANTS PTY

Services —

   

LTD

Multiple Contracts

   

WALKER ENGINEERING

& DRAFTING SERVICES

Engineering Services

Apr 13

19,617

Select tender

WALKER ENGINEERING

& DRAFTING SERVICES

Engineering Services

Apr 12

100,747

Single select

WANNIASSA GIS SERVICES

Provision of GIS Services

Feb 13

39,327

Select tender

Construction related works projects

The LDA used the following external sources of labour and services for construction activities. These contracting entities were all selected in accordance with the Government Procurement Act 2001and Government Procurement Regulation 2007. The amounts shown in the below schedule are payments made on the relevant contracts in 2012-13 but are not reflective of the full contracted amount.

Contracting entity

Description

Month contract

let

Cost ($ ex-GST)

ABLE LANDSCAPING PTY LTD

Landscape Construction — Franklin 2

Oct 11

202,107

ACTEW CORPORATION P/L

Electrical Infrastructure — Multiple Contracts

Aug 12–

Mar 13

26,825

ACTEWAGL DISTRIBUTION

Electrical Infrastructure — Amaroo

Dec 12

37,908

ACTEWAGL DISTRIBUTION

Electrical Infrastructure — Amaroo

Mar 13

44,067

ACTEWAGL DISTRIBUTION

Electrical Infrastructure — Jacka

Aug 12

139,707

ACTEWAGL DISTRIBUTION

Electrical Infrastructure — Kingston

Feb 12

320,983

ACTEWAGL DISTRIBUTION

Electrical Infrastructure — Amaroo

May 13

413,451

ACTEWAGL DISTRIBUTION

Electrical Infrastructure — Lawson

Nov 12

454,934

CANBERRA UNITED LANDSCAPERS

Landscape Construction — GTC

Oct 10

2,468

CANBERRA UNITED LANDSCAPERS

Landscape Construction — Gubur Dhaura

Jun 11

42,772

CANBERRA UNITED LANDSCAPERS

Landscape Construction — Harrison 3

Oct 06

268,331

CHINCIVIL PTY LTD

Civil Works Construction — Harrison 4

Jan 11

500,868

CIVIL WERXS PTY LTD

Civil Works Construction — GTC

Nov 12

106,748

CONSOLIDATED LANDSCAPE SERVICES PTY LTD

Landscape Construction — Bonner 3

Nov 12

412,027

DEEBLE B AND C PTY LTD

Civil Works Construction — Bonner 3

Sep 12

22,455

DEEBLE B AND C PTY LTD

Civil Works Construction — Bonner 3

Oct 12

94,658

DESIGN LANDSCAPES PTY LTD

Landscape Construction — Bonner

Aug 12

52,515

DESIGN LANDSCAPES PTY LTD

Landscape Construction — Wright

Sep 12

1,442,361

GROUP ONE PTY LTD

Civil Works Construction — Wright Stg 1A

Nov 10

25,858

GROUP ONE PTY LTD

Civil Works Construction — Bonner 2

Sep 09

223,797

GROUP ONE PTY LTD

Civil Works Construction — Wright 1B

Aug 11

4,037,154

GROUP ONE PTY LTD

Civil Works Construction — Wright Stg 2

Jan 12

9,393,862

GROUP ONE PTY LTD

Civil Works Construction — Coombs Stg 2

Dec 12

12,725,271

HAWKINS CIVIL ENGINEERING PTY LTD

Civil Works Construction — Kingston Foreshore

Mar 11

117,056

HUON CONTRACTORS PTY LTD

Civil Works Construction — Fyshwick

Jul 10

59,758

HUON CONTRACTORS PTY LTD

Civil Works Construction — Harrison 4

Jan 11

419,407

MANTEENA PTY LTD

Civil Works Construction — Kingston

Jul 11

184,336

MARSUPIAL LANDSCAPE MANAGEMENT PTY LTD

Landscape construction — Franklin

Sep 12

39,400

MARSUPIAL LANDSCAPE MANAGEMENT PTY LTD

Landscape construction — Franklin

Jan 13

110,258

MILIN BROS BUILDERS PTY LTD

Civil Works Construction — Kingston

Aug 12

323,685

PROJECT COORDINATION AUSTRALIA PTY LTD

Civil Works Construction — Franklin

Oct 12

43,087

PROJECT COORDINATION AUSTRALIA PTY LTD

Civil Works Construction — Kingston

Jul 12

230,789

PYRAMID CORPORATION PTY LTD

Landscape Construction — Bonner

May 11

158,277

RAM CONSTRUCTIONS

Landscape Construction — Bonner 1B

May 09

37,730

RAM CONSTRUCTIONS

Landscape Construction — Bonner 1B

Jul 09

120,803

SIMEONOV CIVIL ENGINEERING ACT PTY LTD

Civil Works Construction — Holder 24&25/45

Sep 12

122,099

TELSTRA CORPORATION LTD

Telecommunications Relocations — Wright

Jan 12

47,470

TELSTRA CORPORATION LTD

Telecommunications Relocations — Multiple Contracts

Jul 12–Jun

13

47,760

TELSTRA CORPORATION LTD

Telecommunications Relocations — Hume West

Nov 10

81,359

TRANSACT CAPITAL COMMUNICATIONS PTY LTD

Broadband Infrastructure — Jacka

Jun 13

10,800

TRANSACT CAPITAL COMMUNICATIONS PTY LTD

Fibre to the home — Flemington Road

Nov 11

58,200

TRANSACT CAPITAL COMMUNICATIONS PTY LTD

Broadband Infrastructure — Franklin

Oct 10

120,899

TRANSACT CAPITAL COMMUNICATIONS PTY LTD

Broadband Infrastructure — Jacka

Feb 12

132,000

TRANSACT CAPITAL COMMUNICATIONS PTY LTD

Fibre to the Home — Wright

Jan 13

177,200

TRANSACT CAPITAL COMMUNICATIONS PTY LTD

Fibre to the Home — Franklin

Jun 10

260,400

TRANSACT CAPITAL COMMUNICATIONS PTY LTD

Telecommunications Infrastructure — Harrison 4

Jul 12

313,600

TRANSACT CAPITAL COMMUNICATIONS PTY LTD

Broadband Infrastructure — Bonner

Oct 09

592,800

URBAN CONTRACTORS PTY LTD

Landscape Construction — Franklin

May 12

48,326

URBAN CONTRACTORS PTY LTD

Landscape Construction — Kingston Foreshore

Aug 11

3,842,684

WODEN CONTRACTORS PTY LTD

Civil Works Construction — Bonner 3C

Aug 10

262,924

WODEN CONTRACTORS PTY LTD

Civil Works Construction — Bonner 3A

Apr 10

476,960

Further information may be obtained from:

Senior Business Manager
Telephone: (02) 6207 8263

C16. Community grants/ assistance/sponsorship

Organisation/recipient

Project description/ process/period of time engaged

OutcomesAmount ($ ex-GST)
Cultural Facilities CorporationCanberra Museum andGallery — 2113: A Canberra OdysseyRecognition of the LDA in 20,000 promotion materials and during exhibition20,000

ACT Regional Building and Construction Industry Training Council

Silver Sponsorship of 2012 CITC Outstanding Graduating Apprentice and Industry AwardsRecognition of the LDA in promotion materials2,273
ACT GovernmentCanberra — Create your Future Program 2012-13Recognition of the LDA in promotion materials and
during presentations
5,000

Australian Property Institute

2012 ACT Industry Forum
Sponsorship
Recognition of the LDA in
promotion materials and during presentations
3,000
Australian National UniversityPhD Scholarship funding (Social perspectivies on nature and developing urban areasAnnual progress report to the LDA40,000
Australian National UniversityPhD Scholarship funding Annual progress report to (Maintenance of hollow bearing trees in urban developments including assessing the effectiveness of nesting boxes
replacing hollow bearing trees)
Annual progress report to the LDA15,000

Further information may be obtained from:

Senior Business Manager
Telephone: (02) 6207 8263

C17. Territory records

The records of the ACT Government are an important resource for Canberra residents and government officials alike. Records may provide proof of a particular action and provide evidence, support and transparency of government decisions, which can be invaluable to the progress of Territory business.

Records management emphasises the value of knowledge and information as a resource. A structured approach to record creation, retention and status yields faster retrieval of needed information. Faster and easier access frees LDA staff from searching for information and allows them the time to devote to other tasks. The life cycle extends from the time records are received or created, through processing and use, to placement in storage and retrieval systems, until eventual destruction or permanent archival retention.

The LDA’s records come in many formats including documents, maps, plans, drawings, models, crown leases and investigation reports. Regardless of the format, records are as valuable now as they have ever been for telling a story about the agency’s work and giving context to each task.

The LDA complies with the requirements of the Territory Records Act 2002 (the Act) through the LDA Records Management Program (RMP). The LDA RMP includes Records Management Policy and Procedures in addition to the agency Thesaurus and Records Disposal Schedules. These documents are available to staff via the Economic Development Directorate (EDD) intranet. Staff training is also regularly conducted on record management procedures and practices to ensure a consistent approach is being undertaken to the management of records. The policy and procedures will be reviewed in the next reporting year.

Under the Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) between the LDA and EDD, all records management services, including training, materials and the administration of the TRIM system, are provided by EDD.

An ongoing in-house training program run by the EDD Governance Section is in place to train all staff in basic records management policy and procedures, including ongoing individual support as required. This financial year, 18 LDA staff attended an in-house course in Information and Records Management.

The LDA uses an in-house TRIM database as its record keeping system. To support TRIM, a power user network was created to manage the creation and movement of hard copy files. This network is then supplemented with a TRIM Action Tracking Team, which consists of executives and their assistants who manage all approval processes electronically in TRIM, including any Ministerial matters for or by the LDA. A separate training session and ongoing support is also provided to these staff members. This year five staff were trained in TRIM Power User and Ministerial Action Tracking.

Training sessions

2011-12 attendees

2012-13 attendees

Information and Records Management

71

18

TRIM Power User and Ministerial Action Tracking

21

5

In addition to the Whole-of-Government Thesaurus and Records Disposal Schedules, which are used to manage retention length and disposal of administrative records, agency-specific records are managed in accordance with the following notifiable instruments.

Records disposal schedule name

Effective

Year and no.

Land Development

21 April 2006

NI2006—136

Government Coordination Records

14 September 2007

NI2007—280

In accordance with the Act, the LDA has arrangements in place to preserve records that contain information that may allow people to establish links with their Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander heritage. If any such record is created, received or discovered, the LDA endorses the relevant file with the notation ‘File contains records with Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander heritage information — Do Not Destroy’.

The aim of a disposal freeze on records is to minimise the risk of losing crucial evidence at, or around the time when an issue has been identified. At present there are two disposal freezes that may or may not be relevant to the LDA. They are:

  • the Federal Post Cornwell Superannuation Case Litigation — Processing of Additional Claims; Instruction 23 — TRO Records Advice No. 59. Records Disposal Freeze — Superannuation Records 2010–2015; and
  • Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse — Territory Records (Records Disposal Schedule — Protection of records relevant to the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse) Approval 2013 (No 1).

The LDA will continue to retain records identified under the disposal freezes until the litigation and commission come to an end and the disposal freezes are lifted.

Members of the public can seek access to the LDA’s records by contacting:

Archives ACT
GPO Box 158
Canberra City ACT 2601
Fax Number: (02) 6207 5835
Email: archives@act.gov.au
Phone Contact Numbers:
Reference Archivist (Government Records)
Telephone: (02) 6207 5726
Public Access Support Officer
Telephone: (02) 6205 3510

By maintaining an approved register of Section 28 declarations, the LDA complies with the Act, which allows a declaration to be made in relation to a document classed as an exempt document under prescribed provisions of theFreedom of Information Act 1989. LAND DEVELOPMENT AGENCY

Access to a record to which a declaration applies is prohibited under the Act.

Further information may be obtained from:

Director, Workforce and Governance
Telephone: (02) 6205 9626

C18. Commissioner for the Environment

As in previous years, the LDA has continued to provide information on progress towards implementing relevant recommendations in Commissioner’s reports and has provided other information as requested by the Commissioner.

Following contributions to the review of the State of the Environment Report 2011, the LDA participated in the Office for the Commissioner for Sustainability and the Environment’s workshops to review the State of the Environment reporting framework and contribute to preparation for the 2015 State of the Environment Report. The LDA will continue to be involved in this ongoing review process.

Further information may be obtained from:

Senior Business Manager
Telephone: (02) 6207 8263

C19. Ecologically sustainable development

Background

In 2011-12, the LDA introduced a more comprehensive approach to reporting on sustainability in its core business — land development. This approach covers environmental, social and economic considerations in LDA operations, thus helping to address the principles of ecologically sustainable development.

The 2012-13 LDA Statement of Intent (SOI) outlined a commitment by the LDA to contribute to ‘the delivery of the Government’s key policies and priorities relating to affordable housing, sustainability and climate change’. The SOI also included a range of key performance indicators (KPIs). There were five non-financial KPIs, covering urban water cycle management, sustainable community programs, housing affordability, biodiversity and landscape and design excellence.

Sustainability themes

The LDA has identified the following key themes for sustainability reporting in its projects. These themes include:

  • energy and emissions;
  • water;
  • landscape and biodiversity;
  • waste and materials;
  • influencing design;
  • community;
  • transport; and
  • affordability.

Reporting phases

Reporting phases

Due Diligence Phase reporting

The Due Diligence Phase refers to projects where due diligence procedures are being undertaken to ensure the land is ready for development (for example, ecological, contamination and other studies). These processes influence ‘where, what and how’ development will occur on each site. This phase includes LDA projects that have yet to reach sale or Business Plan Approval for 2012-13.

In 2012-13, 51 sites have been reported within the Due Diligence Phase. This includes three sites for which the LDA undertook assessments on behalf of the Economic Development Directorate (EDD).

Planning Phase reporting

The Planning Phase includes LDA projects where more detailed planning is under way. This phase includes projects that are between Business Plan Approval and Estate Development Plan Approval for 2012-13.

In 2012-13, seven LDA projects have been reported within the Planning Phase.

Civil Works Phase reporting

The Civil Works Phase refers to projects where planning is complete, but civil works and landscaping activities are under way. This phase includes LDA projects that are between Estate Development Plan Approval and handover of assets for 2012-13.

In 2012-13, six LDA projects have been reported within the Civil Works Phase.

Post-Occupancy Phase reporting

The Post-Occupancy Phase refers to projects where civil works have been completed, assets have been handed over, and people are living or working in the area. LDA projects are reported in this phase until the end of LDA involvement.

In 2012-13, six LDA projects have been reported within the Post-Occupancy Phase.

Projects reported in 2012-13

The following table indicates each project and its reporting phase/s for 2012-13.

Project nameType of developmentApprox. total site area (ha)Due diligencePlanningCivil worksPost- occupancy
Amaroo Group CentreMixed use4.3  X 
Belconnen Lathlain St PrecinctResidential, commercial, community2.5X   
Belconnen Section 48Mixed use1.9X   
Belconnen Section 152Mixed use, residential0.6X   
BonnerResidential230.9   X
Campbell Section 5Mixed use, residential6.4 X  
Canberra Brickworks and EnvironsResidential, mixed use47.4X   
CoombsResidential suburb79  X 
Denma Prospect (Englobo and LDA)Residential suburb381X   
FranklinResidential suburb200.7   X
Fyshwick Section 45TBCTBCX   
Fyshwick Section 47Industrial36X   
Greenway LakesideMixed use, residential24 X  

Gungahlin Town Centre East

Mixed use

38

X

   

Harrison 4

Residential suburb

37.2

   

X

Hume New West

Industrial

56

  

X

 

Jacka

Residential suburb

192

X

  

Stage 1

Kenny

Residential suburb

352

X

   

Kinlyside

Nature reserve

201

X

   

Kingston Foreshore

High density residential, commercial

44.47

X

X

X

X

Lawson

Residential suburb

50

 

X

X

 

Molonglo

Residential suburb

116

X

   

Molonglo Demonstration Precinct

Residential

1.6

 

X

  

Molonglo 3

Residential suburb

TBC

X

   

Moncrieff

Residential suburb

186

 

X

  

Parkes Section 3

Mixed use

3.4

X

   

Symonston

Industrial

37

X

   

Taylor

Residential suburb

302

X

   

Throsby

Residential suburb

379

X

   
Woden Furzer St PrecinctMixed use13 X  
WrightResidential suburb80  XX
Urban ReleasesVarious single block or section releases 33 projects   
Total LDA projects reported in 2012-13  51766

Notes:

  • It is important to note that the planning and land development process often occurs over several years. Accordingly, many projects will report on the same phase for two or more consecutive years.
  • The number of projects reported within any given year can vary significantly in response to the Land Release Program (LRP). This must be considered when undertaking any comparisons between reporting periods.
  • A project may be divided into different stages for reporting if some areas are at a different phase to other areas. For example, a project may have some areas where civil works are still being conducted while residents have moved into other areas. This is the case with Jacka, where Stage 1 has progressed to the Post-Occupancy Phase, while the remainder of Jacka is still in the Due Diligence Phase.
  • Equivalents to key milestones may be used as alternatives in some cases. For example, approval by the National Capital Authority may be used as an alternative to Estate Development Plan approval for projects in designated areas.
  • A number of projects crossed key milestones during 2012-13. If the milestone (such as Estate Development Plan approval) occurred during the financial year, the project was required to report on whichever phase applied for the majority of the given financial year. If the milestone occurred close to halfway through the financial year, then the project was required to report on both applicable phases.
  • Molonglo 2 progressed sufficiently during 2012-13 to warrant dividing it for reporting purposes. It is now divided into Denman Prospect and Molonglo. As new developments in the Molonglo Valley continue to progress they will be divided further.
  • Some LDA sites are sold as englobo sites after the Due Diligence Phase. Therefore, not all projects will proceed from the Due Diligence Phase to the Planning Phase. In these cases, once the project has progressed through the Due Diligence Phase, this is seen as the end of LDA involvement.
  • The LDA also engages in joint venture projects which are largely managed by the joint venture partner. LDA involvement is reduced following Business Plan approval, with Business Plans being approved by the Joint Venture Management Committee rather than the LDA Board. For these reasons, joint venture projects have not been reported against in 2012-13.

Further information may be obtained from:

Senior Business Manager
Telephone: (02) 6207 8263

Sustainability indicators

The LDA has developed a suite of indicators to report on environmental, social and economic sustainability throughout the land development process. Indicators reflect on operations that the LDA controls and influences directly. They are grouped by theme and separated by reporting phases.

Projects within an individual phase will only report on the indicators directly related to that phase.

2011-12 was the first time that this approach to sustainability reporting had been used by the LDA in the annual report. Some indicators have been subsequently amended and additional indicators included based on a review process.

 Due Diligence (DD)Planning (PL)Civil Works (CW)Post-Occupancy (PO)
Energy and emissions Solar accessPublic lighting Rebate schemes or mandates 
WaterCatchment Water analysis and/or (WSUD) flooding studiesWater Sensitive Urban Design(WSUD)Sediment anderosion controlWSUD monitoring
Landscape and biodiversity

Ecological assessments

Tree assessments

Contamination studies

Geotechnical assessments

Bushfire risk assessments

Public open space

Protection of threatened species, populations and ecological communities

Protection or management of identified areas of ecological importance

Tree protection

Weed and pest control

 
Waste and materials  

Cut and fill minimisation

Recycled or reused materials

 
Influencing design Design Review Panel  
     

Community

Community engagement

Heritage assessments

Noise assessments

Community engagement

Protection or management of identified areas of heritage importance

Residential community programs

TransportTraffic and parking assessmentsPublic transport proximityPedestrian and cycle networks and facilities 
Affordability Planning for affordability 

Affordable dwellings

Land Rent blocks

Solar access

Solar access requirements are outlined in the Territory Plan. In all LDA estates, the layout and orientation of streets and blocks are designed to facilitate good solar access once dwellings have been built.

Public lighting

Public lighting in LDA projects must meet energy efficient design standards. Several LDA projects have promoted or trialled energy efficient lighting above usual standards. In the suburb of Lawson the LDA is planning to undertake a trial of LED street lighting.

Rebate schemes or mandates

Rebate schemes or mandates have been used in some LDA residential estates to encourage the use of efficient appliances and hot water systems.

In Wright, a rebate has been offered to encourage residents to install energy efficient solar hot water systems. Following this initiative, solar hot water systems have been mandated in Coombs. Rebates for residents in Wright and Coombs have also been offered for the installation of energy efficient heating and cooling systems.

Water

Reporting phaseIndicators2011-122012-13

DD

Number of catchment management analysis and/or flooding studies conducted for LDA projects

4 (catchment management only)

10

PLPercentage of LDA projects with WSUD strategies appropriate to the size and location of the projects100%100%
CWPercentage of LDA 100% 100% projects that have met or exceeded sediment and erosion control requirements100%100%
POLDA projects that have post-occupancy water monitoring11

Catchment management analysis and flooding studies

Catchment management analysis studies assess a development’s impact on drainage, existing water bodies or water courses and groundwater. In 2012-13 this indicator was amended to include flooding studies. Flooding studies are conducted for smaller development sites to assess potential flooding risks and the impact that development may have on flooding.

Water sensitive urban design

Water sensitive urban design (WSUD) is included in all new developments under the Territory Plan, as part of the ACT Government’s broader strategy of responsible water resource management. WSUD seeks to use a more sustainable approach by integrating water management into urban development.

In the 2012-13 LDA Statement of Intent (SOI), a non-financial key performance indicator (KPI) required all LDA projects to have a specific WSUD strategy appropriate to the size and location of the project. This target has been achieved with all LDA projects reported during the Planning Phase having WSUD in place.

In Lawson, extensive rehabilitation of College Creek is planned. This will create habitat and improve the amenity of the area while also improving the quality of the water entering Lake Ginninderra.

WSUD is being implemented at the Amaroo Group Centre during the Civil Works Phase. The innovative Stratacell technology is being installed to help filter stormwater runoff and improve water quality.

Sediment and erosion controls

Sediment and erosion controls help to ensure that no pollutants run off from a site. Pollutants can contribute to environmental degradation and the devastation of terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems.

Sediment ponds, silt fences and stormwater diversions are examples of sediment and erosion control methods used in LDA projects.

Sediment and erosion controls

 

Bonner Ponds

 

Post-occupancy water monitoring

One project of the six reported in the Post-Occupancy Phase had water monitoring undertaken by the LDA in 2012-13.

Norgrove Park Wetlands and Pond in Kingston Foreshore treats stormwater while also providing habitat to birds and frogs and adding recreational and visual amenity to the suburb. The performance of the pond has been monitored since its construction and on average complies with or exceeds the WSUD targets. This helps improve the quality of the water entering Lake Burley Griffin.

Landscape and biodiversity

Reporting Phase

Indicators

2011-12

2012-13

DD

Number of ecological assessments conducted

26

42

 

for LDA projects

  

DD

Number of tree assessments conducted for

33

37

 

LDA projects

  

DD

Number of contamination studies undertaken

26

41

 

(and remediation conducted as required) for

  
 

LDA projects

  

DD

Number of geotechnical assessments

No historical

39

 

conducted for LDA projects

data — indicator

 
  

introduced in

 
  

2012-13

 

DD

Number of bushfire risk assessments

4

7

 

conducted for LDA projects

  

PL

Area of public open space included in LDA

74 ha of 242 ha

149 ha of 339 ha

 

projects

total site area

total site area

PL

Amount of land set aside or created for the

83 ha

112 ha

 

protection of threatened species, populations

  
 

and ecological communities

  

CW

Percentage of LDA projects that have

No historical

100%

 

measures in place to protect or manage

data — indicator

 
 

identified areas of ecological importance

introduced in

 
  

2012-13

 

CW

Percentage of LDA projects that have tree

100%

100%

 

protection measures in place

  

CW

Percentage of LDA projects that have weed

100%

100%

 

and pest control measures in place

  

Ecological assessments

Ecological assessments are performed during the Due Diligence Phase and are an important part of land development investigations. Ecological assessments help to identify threatened or endangered species, populations or ecological communities on a site, and include any referrals processes relating to the Australian Government’s Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999.

Tree assessments

The LDA conducts an extensive amount of work around the management, assessment and data collection of trees within its developments. Tree assessments capture the following.

  • Regulated or registered trees.
  • Location.
  • Species.
  • Height.
  • Canopy spread.
  • Trunk circumference.
  • Number of trunks.
  • Recommendation to retain and manage or to remove.
  • Arboricultural assessment.
  • Urban amenity assessment.

Contamination studies

Contamination studies and remedial requirements are established during the Due Diligence Phase. Contamination is prevalent in both greenfield and infill locations with remediation actions required for a wide variety of sources (sheep dips, stockpiles from unknown sources, illegal dumping, former buildings and structures).

In the suburb of Molonglo, a former homestead site had a range of contamination including old sheep dips and septic tanks. This site required extensive clearing and remediation to remove contaminated materials prior to development.

Geotechnical assessments

Geotechnical assessments are conducted to assess whether areas are suitable for future construction and development and to inform the design requirement of estate works.

Bushfire risk assessments

Developments adjoining potentially fire prone areas require bushfire risk assessments to be conducted.

Public open space

The area of public open space refers to all areas that are zoned as ‘parks and recreation’ and ‘non-urban’ in the Territory Plan.

For developments in the Planning Phase, the LDA has contributed around 44 per cent of the total land area to open space in 2012-13.

Protection of threatened species, population and ecological communities

The LDA is responsible for reserving and managing areas of land in order to protect threatened species, populations or ecological communities. These sites can include land reserved onsite (within the development) or off-site (including offset areas).

At Lawson, an area of land will be identified and managed as Golden Sun Moth habitat. An offset area will also be established as a nature reserve to protect Natural Temperate Grassland and Golden Sun Moth habitat.

Ecological studies at Greenway Lakeside have not identified any threatened species, populations or ecological communities. However approximately 7.9 hectares will be preserved in its current state to retain existing habitats.

Tree protection

Tree Management Plans are required for LDA projects where trees are identified for retention and management through tree assessments undertaken during the Due Diligence Phase. Tree Management Plans describe how trees within a development will be protected and managed through the Civil Works Phase when earthworks and construction take place.

Over 850 trees were planted (including street trees and trees in landscaped areas) and over 500 trees retained within LDA developments during 2012-13. This is approximately seven times more trees planted or retained than were removed in the process of land development.

Weed and pest control methods

Weed and pest control methods are specific to each site.

Weeds were removed from the Amaroo Group Centre in 2012-13.

The LDA also partnered with Greening Australia to develop the Molonglo Valley Local Native Plant Guide. This planting guide aims to educate residents about suitable endemic native plant species for their gardens. This helps to reduce the amount of exotic plants introduced into the landscape.

Waste and materials

Reporting phaseIndicators2011-122012-13
CWPercentage of LDA project that minimised cut and fill through design and landscaping100%100%
CWLDA projects that have used recycled or reused materials in civil works and landscaping44

 

Cut and fill minimisation

By balancing the amount of cut and fill required on site, LDA projects reduce earthworks and associated impacts on the site.

Wright and Coombs have limited the amount of cut and fill to a maximum of 1.5 metres as part of the requirement for Urban Development Institute of Australia EnviroDevelopment accreditation.

Excess topsoil from Amaroo Group Centre was transported to the nearby open space in Bonner Stage 3 to assist in landscaping. This reduced the amount of transport required for both the Amaroo Group Centre and Bonner projects.

Recycled or reduced materials

Where possible, LDA projects have recycled or reused materials in construction.

The kayak jetty in Kingston Foreshore’s harbour has been constructed from recycled timber.

At the Amaroo Group Centre, existing concrete paths, kerbs, medians and asphalt were crushed and reused in the construction of retaining walls onsite.

Trees removed from Coombs were mulched and provided to the Arboretum for use.

Influencing design

Reporting phaseIndicators2011-122012-13
PLNumber of LDA projects that use the Design Review Panel at the Planning Phase83

 

Design Review Panel

The LDA Design Review Panel (DRP) consists of respected academics, planners, architects and landscape architects who meet to review LDA and Economic Development Directorate (EDD) projects. Projects are presented to the panel for comments and advice regarding design outcomes. Three projects within the Planning Phase were presented to the DRP in 2012-13. The remaining projects within the Planning Phase have been presented to the DRP in previous financial years.

Nineteen other projects were also presented to the DRP in 2012-13. This includes LDA projects in other reporting phases such as the Amaroo Group Centre. It also includes a number of EDD projects and some projects brought to the DRP by the ACT Government Architect on behalf of the Environment and Sustainable Development Directorate (ESDD).

In the 2012-13 LDA SOI, a non-financial KPI required all LDA projects be presented to the DRP prior to the Board’s consideration of the Project Business Plan. This target was achieved for 2012-13 with Throsby and Denman Prospect presented to the DRP before Business Plan approval.

The Molonglo Demonstration Precinct has been presented to the DRP multiple times. The advice and feedback from the DRP has extensively informed the layout and architectural design of this project.

Community

Reporting phaseIndicators2011-122012-13
DDNumber of projects that conducted community engagementNo historical data —
indicator
introduced in
2012-13
30
DDNumber of heritage assessments conducted
for LDA projects
2640
DDNumber of noise assessments conducted for 2 4
LDA projects
24
PLPercentage of LDA projects that conducted
community engagement
100%100%
CWPercentage of LDA projects that have measures in place to protect or manage identified areas of heritage importanceNo historical data —
indicator
introduced in
2012-13
100%
POResidential LDA estates using community
programs
34

Heritage assessments

Heritage assessments were conducted on many LDA projects in 2012-13. Where areas of heritage importance were identified, protection measures were in place in all LDA developments in the Civil Works Phase. This includes heritage areas that have community value, but are not formally listed on the Heritage Register.

In Kingston Foreshore, the LDA has kept suckers from a heritage tree, which will be replanted in the future. The heritage tree was being protected, but fell over during a storm. The LDA has tried to ensure that despite this unfortunate event, the legacy of the heritage tree is preserved.

In Lawson, the former Travelling Stock Route and the form of the existing windbreak will be preserved. Vistas to the heritage-listed Belconnen Naval Transmitting Station have also been included.

Coombs is home to many former historic roads. The trees that line one of these are known as the ‘jogalong’ trees. They have been protected and incorporated into the landscape design. In the longer term, they will be managed with a replacement program.

Noise assessment

Noise assessments are conducted where required to assess the potential impacts of proposed developments on existing surrounds.

At Belconnen Section 152, a noise assessment was conducted due to proximity to the community bus station.

Community engagement

Community engagement has been conducted on all LDA projects reported in the Due Diligence Phase and the Planning Phase where applicable. Community engagement did not apply to a number of projects as it had already occurred in previous financial years, been undertaken by other agencies or is scheduled to take place in the upcoming financial year. For some projects that were subject to other ongoing studies or assessments, 2012-13 was not an appropriate timeframe for community engagement to be undertaken while the results of these assessments were being determined.

As part of the community engagement process, the LDA conducts consultation sessions with stakeholders, community groups, adjacent land lessees, and the broader ACT community. Community engagement is used not only to inform but to consult, involve and collaborate with the community.

Community programs

The LDA has engaged with the community through the Mingle Community Development Program. A range of Mingle community events were held throughout 2012-13 in Bonner and Franklin and included walking tours, photography lessons, information days, pet play days, movie nights and Christmas lights competitions. The Mingle program for the Molonglo Valley is under development.

In Kingston Foreshore, the Canberra International Music Festival was held for the second time. Websites and newsletters were also used for ongoing engagement with the community.

Transport

Reporting phaseIndicators2011-122012-13
DDNumber of traffic and parking assessments conducted for LDA projects2432
PLPercentage of projects in which all dwellings are
located within required proximity to public transport
100%100%
PLPercentage of projects that comply with or exceeds standards for pedestrian and cycle networks and facilities100%100%

Traffic and parking assessments

Traffic and parking assessments review the existing road networks and traffic conditions around a site and assess the required onsite parking demand and traffic impact of new developments.

Public transport proximity

All projects within the Planning Phase met the requirements for proximity to public transport according to the Territory Plan.

Pedestrian and cycle networks and facilities

All projects within the Planning Phase complied with the standards for pedestrian and cycle networks and facilities.

Affordability

Reporting phaseIndicators2011-122012-13
PLPercentage of projects that comply with affordability requirementsNo historical data — indicator introduced in 2012-13100%
PONumber of blocks settled under
Land Rent
837730
PONumber of affordable dwellings delivered in LDA projectsNo historical data — indicator introduced in 2012-1331

Affordable housing

Housing affordability is a key issue in the ACT. The 2012-13 LDA SOI includes nonfinancial KPIs to ensure both englobo and LDA greenfield developments have 20 per cent of dwelling sites released for the purpose of providing affordable housing. All LDA projects in the Planning Phase complied with these affordability requirements.

Land rent

In accordance with the ACT Government’s Affordable Housing Action Plan, the LDA provides the option for purchasers of land in LDA residential estates to take up a land rent lease. This scheme commenced on 1 July 2008.

In 2012-13, 730 blocks were settled under the Land Rent Scheme.

Resource consumption

The following table provides information on the LDA’s energy, water, transport fuel and waste consumption and the associated greenhouse gas emissions. Consumption is reported for the LDA’s office accommodation and external usage within LDA developments.

Line

Indicator as at 30 June

Unit

2011-12

2012-13

 

General

 

Office

Total

Office

Total

L1

Occupancy — staff full- time equivalent

No. FTE

85.5

85.5

89.2

89.2

L2

Area office space — net

m21,6931,6931,9271,927
 

Stationary energy

     

 

  

Office

Total

Office

Total

L3

Electricity use

kw hrs

374,096

551,873

146,457

290,457

   

(145,774)

(323,551)

  

L4

Renewable energy use (GreenPower + EDL land fill gases)

kw hrs

27,603

56,031

1,650

13,675

L5

Percentage of renewable

%

7.4

10.2

1.1

4.7

 

energy used (L4/L3 x 100)

 

(18.9)

(17.3)

  

L6

Natural Gas use

MJ

771,800

(36)

771,800

(36)

0

0

L7*

Total energy use

MJ

2,118,574

(524,822)

2,758,543

(1,164,818)

527,359

1,045,647

L8

Energy intensity per FTE

MJ/FTE

24,778

N/A

5,912

N/A

 

(L7/L1)

 

(6,138)

   

L9

Energy intensity per

MJ/m2

1,251

N/A

274

N/A

 

square metre (L7/L2)

 

(310)

   
 

Transport

 

Office

Total

Office

Total

L10

Total number of vehicles

No.

5

5

5

5

L11

Total vehicle kilometres travelled

km

89,754

89,754

81,729

81,729

L12

Transport fuel (petrol)

kL

3.77

3.77

2.84

2.84

Line

Indicator as at 30 June

Unit

2011-12

 

2012-13

 

L13

Transport fuel (diesel)

kL

6.60

6.60

5.77

5.77

L14

Transport fuel (LPG)

kL

0

0

0

0

L15

Transport fuel (CNG)

kL

0

0

0

0

L16*

Total transport energy use

GJ

384

384

320

320

 

Water

 

Office

Total

Office

Total

L17

Water use

kL

1,063

7,734

0

6,217

   

(0)

(6,670)

  
 

Intensities

     

L18

Water use per FTE (L17/

kL/FTE

12.44

N/A

0

N/A

 

L1)

 

(0)

   

L19

Water use per square

kL/m2

0.63

N/A

0

N/A

 

metre (L17/L2)

 

(0)

   
 

Resource efficiency and waste

 

Office

Total

Office

Total

L20

Reams of paper purchased

No.

1,691

1,691

1,829

1,829

L21

Recycled content of paper purchased

%

66.6

66.6

63

63

L22

Estimate of general waste (based on bins collected)

L

see notes

see notes

see notes

see notes

L23

Estimate of commingled material recycled (based on bins collected)

L

46,612

46,612

47,142

47,142

L24

Estimate of paper recycled (based on bins collected)

L

133,621

133,621

104,267

104,267

L25

Estimate of organic material recycled (based on bins collected)

L

4,605

4,605

2,673

2,673

 

Greenhouse gas emissions

 

Office

Total

Office

Total

L26*

Total stationary energy greenhouse gas emissions (all scopes)

 

t CO -e

2

419.78

(125.93)

578.92

(285.07)

172.95

313.55

L27*transport greenhouse gas emissions (all scopes)t CO 2-e28.8228.8224.0324.03
 Intensities
L28Greenhouse gas emissions per persont CO 2-e FTE4.91(1.47)N/A1.94N/A
L29Greenhouse gas emissions per square metre (L26/L2)t CO 2-e0.25 (0.07)N/A0.09N/A
L30Transport greenhouse gas emissions per person (L27/L1)t CO 2-e FTE0.34N/A0.27N/A

Note: Calculated with information entered into OSCAR. kw = kilowatt; MJ = megajoule; GJ = gigajoule; t CO 2 -e = tonnes of CO 2 equivalent.

Supporting notes to table

OSCAR (Online System for Comprehensive Activity Report) is used to gather and report on all internal energy, water and greenhouse gas consumption as mandated by the ACT Government.

In 2011-12, central services consumption (percentage of total base building consumption as provided by Territory and Municipal Services Directorate (TAMSD) was included in the LDAs office consumption data. In 2012-13, TAMSD were not able to provide central services data (including electricity, water and gas). Data for 2011-12 has therefore been recalculated (shown in brackets in green) to show office energy use without central services consumption to allow for comparison between the years.

General

Full-time equivalent (FTE) figures include all LDA staff members.

All LDA staff members occupy the office located at TransACT House, Dickson on the ground floor, level 6 and level 7. The TransACT House office accommodation is shared with staff from the EDD.

The net lettable area (NLA) of office space has been apportioned based on the number of FTE staff within EDD and LDA at TransACT House.

Stationary energy

Stationary energy is divided into office consumption and total consumption. Office consumption is any consumption related directly to our internal business operations. This includes the following categories as reported in OSCAR.

  • Office — public areas (includes all sales offices).
  • Office — tenant light and power (TransACT House — ground floor, level 6 and level 7).

In 2012-13, the LDA had no operating sales offices.

It should also be noted that the electricity use provided by Territory and Municipal Services Directorate (TAMSD) and ActewAGL for ground floor of TransACT house is assumed to be the consumption of the total ground floor electricity use and not just LDA’s proportion of the space. Without better data, this consumption has been included for 2011-12 and 2012-13 and is currently being investigated.

The majority of gas consumption as reported in 2010-11 was from central services consumption at TransACT House. Removing the central services component, the remaining gas consumption (36 MJ) was from the Bonner Sales Office, which closed in September 2011.

Other energy consumption is generated at LDA managed estates and properties throughout the ACT. These estates change over time as land is developed and sold. This consumption includes irrigation pumps, sewer valves, gross pollutant traps, offsite storage sheds, etc.

Energy intensities have been reported using office consumption data only levels. Intensities based on total consumption data are not indicative due to the nature of the LDA operations and the types of external uses being managed as described above. They are not directly related to the number of FTE staff employed by the LDA or the amount of office NLA.

Transport

The LDA vehicle fleet is managed by SG Fleet (whole-of-government provider) who provide accurate data on the kilometres travelled and fuel consumption of all LDA vehicles. Fuel substitution away from petrol and towards diesel has continued to occur in 2012-13 and is evident in the reported figures.

While there is an EDD car available to LDA staff, only LDA managed vehicles were included in the transport analysis of TransACT House. While EDD staff are also allowed to use LDA cars, the percentage of EDD staff use for 2012-13 was not available and hence total use of LDA cars was attributed to the LDA.

Water

TAMSD were not able to provide water use for TransACT House in 2012-13. Therefore, all water reported in 2012-13 is from LDA managed estates and properties throughout the ACT. These sites change over time as land is developed and sold. Water uses include irrigation water, public buildings, bubblers and gross pollutant traps.

As with energy, water consumption intensities have not been calculated using consumption from external estate meters. Water use in our estates is not directly related to the number of FTE staff employed by the LDA or the amount of office NLA.

Resource efficiency and waste

Paper for LDA and EDD staff is purchased together for TransACT House. Paper consumption has been apportioned based on the FTE numbers of EDD and LDA staff. Similarly, waste is collected for both LDA and EDD staff at TransACT House and has been apportioned based on the FTE numbers of EDD and LDA staff.

Waste is reported based on the number of bins collected for a particular waste/recycling stream. Unless all bins are full, the reported figures may not be the actual amount of waste produced, but are the best estimate available at this point in time. Bins were calculated at 240L per bin.

General waste from the LDA offices is not separately sorted from other waste generated at TransACT House and figures are therefore not available for inclusion in this report.

Greenhouse gas emissions

Total stationary energy greenhouse gas emissions are calculated as net emissions — those generated from stationary energy consumption minus any greenhouse gas emissions offset through the purchase of renewable energy.

Further information may be obtained from:

Senior Business Manager
Telephone: (02) 6207 8263

C20. Climate change and greenhouse gas reduction policies and programs

Over the last year the LDA has continued to develop and implement policies and programs to address climate change and greenhouse gas emissions and to address the targets set out in part 2 of the Climate Change and Greenhouse Gas Reduction Act 2010.

The LDA continues to implement its Sustainability and Innovation Framework and has developed a more comprehensive approach to reporting on sustainability initiatives. This has been undertaken at a project level and aggregated for inclusion in this Report.

During 2012-13 the LDA has achieved the following.

  • Signed a licence agreement with NSW Landcom for the use of PrecinX, a mathematical tool that calculates sustainability performance of estates. PrecinX has been adapted for ACT conditions and is being trialled in a number of LDA projects. It allows the LDA to analyse the sustainability of its projects from the early design stage including energy use and greenhouse gas emissions.
  • Started to pilot the Green Star – Communities tool developed by the Green Building Council of Australia in Lawson. With other government land organisations, the LDA has been a sponsor of the tool. The tool includes requirements for quantified reductions in greenhouse gas emissions.
  • Achieved recertification under the Urban Development Institute of Australia EnviroDevelopment program for Wright and Coombs, the first suburbs in Molonglo Valley. This has required a quantified reduction in greenhouse gas emissions over and above current regulatory requirements. Specific initiatives in Molonglo include the following.
    • A Home Sustainability Advisory Service, which offers buyers free one-on-one sessions with a dedicated advisor to help reduce their carbon footprint. This service includes advice about incorporating sustainability measures into new homes during the design stage.
    • Requirements for multi-unit developments in Wright and Coombs to meet a seven star energy rating and water efficient fixtures and fittings.
    • Orientation of blocks and solar envelope controls to ensure that homes in Wright and Coombs receive sufficient sunlight and do not overshadow their neighbours.
  • Mandated energy efficient hot water systems (such as solar) in Harrison 4, Coombs and Jacka. This builds on the earlier program of offering a rebate in Bonner and Wright.
  • Initiated the installation of energy efficient compact fluorescent streetlights in Bonner and Harrison 4 in conjunction with ActewAGL and the Territory and Municipal Services Directorate. These have the potential to reduce energy use and emissions by more than 50 per cent over standard street lighting. A trial of LED lighting is planned for Lawson.
  • Progressed the development of a demonstration precinct designed to provide an exemplar sustainable living community in Coombs.
  • Together with our joint venture partners at Crace, strived to reduce emissions in design and construction to achieve a carbon neutral subdivision. While there are inevitable carbon emissions as a result of land development, these have been offset through purchase of carbon credits under Greening Australia’s Carbon Credit Scheme.

Further information may be obtained from:

Senior Business Manager
Telephone: (02) 6207 8263

C21. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander reporting

In delivering with the ACT Government’s Indicative Land Release Programs 2013-14 to 2016-17, the LDA appoints consultants through the Cultural and Heritage Assessment Services Panel. Consultants then engage ACT Representative Aboriginal Organisations as sub-consultants to provide services for land preparation for both Aboriginal and European heritage matters.

In addressing the Overcoming Indigenous Disadvantage Report (2011) produced by the Productivity Commission, the LDA is making progress against relevant strategic areas outlined in the report.

As part of the LDA’s Communication and Stakeholder Management strategy for Bonner, indigenous artist Duncan Smith was engaged to create a mural for display at the Bonner Living Showcase. More than 150 children from Amaroo School assisted Duncan with the mural entitled ‘Yerrabi Ponds’. The mural depicts the area as a meeting place for the indigenous Gungahlin Community and features animals that inhabited the area prior to urbanisation. The event highlighted the collaboration between the LDA, Duncan Smith and the Amaroo School.

Further information may be obtained from:

Senior Business Manager
Telephone: (02) 6207 8263

C22. ACT Multicultural Strategy 2010–13

Further information may be obtained from:

Focus areaProgress
Languages

The LDA has been developing new procedures around the accessibility of information on its website. It currently includes references to the Accessibility Block (contact information to support translation of documents).

Most hard copy brochures and other materials now include the Accessibility Block and work continues to ensure this in included in future publications.

Children and young people

The LDA’s Community Development Program, Mingle, sought to involve as many

residents as possible within Franklin, Bonner and Gungahlin.

In 2012-13, the LDA hosted a range of activities in Franklin and Bonner, that were targeted at different age levels. Activities included: a walking tour of Gubur Dhaura; pet play dates; GardenSmart activities; a twilight movie event; photography lessons and a Christmas lights competition.

In May 2013, the LDA hosted the 2nd Canberra International Music Festival Twilight event at Kingston Foreshore. The performance included a range of music styles to encourage community members of all ages to come together to celebrate international music.

Older people and aged careSome of the LDA’s Mingle activities in 2012-13 were developed with older people in mind. This followed feedback from the residents. New activities include a walking tour of Gubur Dhaura and GardenSmart activities.
WomenRefer to Section 24, ACT Women’s Plan 2010–15 for information.
Refugees, asylum seekers and humanitarian entrants 
Intercultural harmony and religious acceptance

LDA staff are encouraged to participate in cultural and religious celebrations by and religious accessing flexible working arrangements, relevant leave and a sustainable work acceptance life balance.

LDA celebrated events including NAIDOC week, A Taste of Harmony and National Reconciliation Week.

LDA participated in training that covered a diverse range of topics including the ACT Public Service Respect Equity and Diversity Framework.

 

Director, Workforce and Governance
Telephone: (02) 6205 9626

C23. ACT Strategic Plan for Positive Ageing 2010–14

Focus areaProgress
Information and
communication

The LDA provides access to all information and resources through a variety of mechanisms including:

  • providing customers with details of available Translation Services — the LDA website contains a link to the free Interpretation Services;

  • providing a range of brochures for sales and community information, which are also available on the LDA website;

  • a free phone hotline is available to enable customers to talk directly to staff; and

  • opportunities are available to discuss activities face to face through the LDA sales team or via the Mingle program.

Health and wellbeing

Some of the LDA’s Mingle activities in 2012-13 were developed with older
people in mind. This also followed feedback from residents. New activities
included a walking tour of Gubur Dhaura and GardenSmart activities.
LDA offers a range of physical activities that are available to staff of all ages.

Respect, valuing and safetyLDA staff participated in Respect, Equity and Diversity training. This training highlighted the importance of respecting and valuing people.
Housing and
accommodation
The Land Rent Scheme allows a person to lease a land rent block on an
ongoing basis by paying a percentage of the value of the land. This reduces the
entry costs and mortgage payments for homeowners.
A person can also choose to purchase the land outright from the Government
at a later date.
The benefit of the scheme is to enable people to buy a home sooner by
reducing borrowing costs, allowing people to save to buy the land outright in the
future while paying land rent.
Support servicesLDA staff have access to the EAP service. This service offers a variety of support
services.
Transport and mobility

The LDA hosted a Community Festival in Franklin and a free shuttle bus around
the community was provided to assist the elderly to attend.

Work and retirementThe LDA provides a number of initiatives to attract and retain mature age
staff. Initiatives include: supporting work/life balance by offering flexible work
arrangements; part-time work; and access to carers’ leave and grandparents’
leave. LDA mature age staff had access to superannuation seminars
and transition to retirement superannuation

Further information may be obtained from:

Director, Workforce and Governance
Telephone: (02) 6205 9626

C24. ACT Women’s Plan 2010–15

Economic

Social

Environmental

Strategic outcome

Women and girls equally and

fully participate in the ACT

economy.

Women and girls equally and

fully participate in sustaining

their families and communities

and enjoy community inclusion

and wellbeing.

Women and girls equally and

fully participate in planning and

sharing a safe, accessible and

sustainable city.

Priority areas

Responsive education, training

and lifelong learning.

Flexible workplaces.

Economic independence and

opportunities.

Leadership and decision making.

Safe and respectful relationships.

Good health and wellbeing.

Safe and accessible housing.

Safe and responsive transport

and urban planning.

Sustainable environment.

Indicators of progress

The LDA provides a number

of facilities and conditions

to support staff with family

responsibilities including:

part-time work arrangements;

home-based work; access

to grandparents’ leave; and

18 weeks maternity/primary

care giver leave. The LDA also

provides a dedicated carers’

room. During the current

reporting period, LDA became

accredited as a breastfeeding

friendly organisation.

Events delivered by the LDA

focus on family friendliness

and allow women and girls to

equally and fully participate in

community celebrations. These

include Mingle events and the

International Music Festival

Twilight event at Kingston

Foreshore.

The LDA provides lockers,

shower facilities, change rooms

and bike racks to support staff

who choose to ride or walk to

work or participate in physical

activity during lunch hours.

Further information may be obtained from:

Director, Workforce and Governance
Telephone: (02) 6205 9626

C25. Model litigant guidelines

The Model Litigant Guidelines apply to all Territory legal work, including conduct that may lead to litigation in the future, even if advice has not been sought from the ACT Government Solicitor (ACTGS).

The ACTGS conducted all of the LDA’s litigation during 2012-13 and in doing so applied the Model Litigant Guidelines to its practice.

No breaches of the Model Litigant Guidelines by the LDA occurred in 2012-13.

Further information may be obtained from:

Director, Workforce and Governance
Telephone: (02) 6205 9626

C26. Notice of non-compliance

There were no notices of non-compliance served on the LDA in 2012-13.

Further information may be obtained from:

Senior Business Manager
Telephone: (02) 6207 8263

C27. Property crime

The LDA did not have any programs, projects and/or action items listed to report on as outlined in the ACT Property Crime Strategy 2012–15.

Further information may be obtained from:

Director, Workforce and Governance
Telephone: (02) 6205 9626
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